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Reeder: Here’s what Christians should say when traditional marriage views are labeled ‘bigotry’


 

 

 

 

 

Read the transcript:

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, on this Wednesday, I’d like to do a lightning round with you.

First story up, Kentucky governor calls for any elected official who has settled a sexual harassment claim to resign. Kentucky governor, Matt Bevin, called for elected officials and state employees who have settled sexual harassment claims to resign, saying, “Such behavior falls below the moral standard expected of them.”

DR. REEDER: When I heard that, I was just so overwhelmed with the moral clarity that this governor has brought. He could have as easily just dodged this and said, “Well, we don’t know why they settled this and why they settled that. Maybe it was expedient.”

He said, “Nope, if you handled this with an out-of-court settlement and, certainly, if it went through the court case and you were convicted, that is unacceptable behavior in the lives of our leaders and of our state. We are saying you ought to resign. It is your ethical responsibility.”

Of course, the occasion is a Republican Speaker of the House in Kentucky had a sexual harassment case that was settled out of court, it’s now become clear. He said he wasn’t going to resign. He did resign as the Speaker of the House, but he is continuing to be a representative from his district. When the governor was asked about it, that was his response.

There are some people that, perhaps, it was questionable as to whether what they did was truly a matter of sexual harassment, but there are insurance companies that will say, “Look, let’s just settle, anyway, and just move on.”

Now, people are going to say, “No, no. If I’m not guilty, I’m not guilty. I’m not going to settle to move on. I don’t care what it costs, I’ve got to protect my name and my reputation.”

And I think one of the things that would greatly help us in public policy, though, is to legislate a law that, if you bring a case, and lose it, and the judge affirms it as a frivolous case then the people who brought the case have to pay the lawyers’ fees and the court expenses.

That would cut down on some of these because there are some people that bring law cases, knowing that they wouldn’t have a case if it got to court, but also knowing that insurance companies figure, “It’ll cost us less to settle,” and so they go ahead and settle. That is happening constantly and that needs to stop.

TOM LAMPRECHT: Speaking of harassment, Harry, the LGBTQ students at Azusa Pacific University, a Christian private school in southern California, are now demanding that the school end its support of traditional marriage and its disapproval of same-sex relationships on campus.

Basically, they’re saying, “End your support of Biblical morality.” This all stems from a case where a line cook at the university is suing for harassment because he says that he faced verbal abuse by students and employees because he would not take the same Biblical stance.

DR. REEDER: He was challenged by the students in their discussions so, again, now we’ve got a situation where, “Someone disagrees with me and I bring a lawsuit because I have a so-called right to go through life without being challenged intellectually, morally or socially. If I’m challenged, that’s tantamount to harassment.”

It goes on to say that these students say, “We must give up the Biblical view of marriage and sexuality and move beyond its,” quote, “‘bigotry.’”

What we have embraced as the high standards of ethical behavior in what is marriage and sexuality within a marriage defined by one man and one woman for one life, that has stood the test of time of morality and of ethical virtue is now being called bigotry.

Well, my goodness, it seems as if Jesus was right. What will happen if they call evil good and good evil? What will happen if the light is darkness and the darkness is light? How great is that darkness? When you call the darkness light and lightness darkness?

For Christians, when that time comes – and even in this time – we just simply need to say, “Jesus Christ is my Lord and the Word of God is the final authority of my faith and practice. You may call sexuality within marriage and the marriage of one man and one woman bigotry but I call it faithfulness to the Word of God.

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, let me take you to Story No. 3: The Washington Examiner and The New York Times both did a detailed story on this a few days ago. Back on October the 24th, the DC Circuit Court said that an illegal youth by the name of Jane Doe must be released in order to have an abortion. That was on October the 24th.

Attorneys from the Department of Justice went to the ACLU attorneys who were representing the young lady and asked when would the abortion take place. They assured them it would not happen for two days. However, those attorneys apparently rushed the girl in the very next morning and had the abortion.

Now, the Justice Department is asking the Supreme Court to review the case and bring disciplinary action to the ACLU attorneys who lied.

DR. REEDER: Yes, this is very interesting. The Department of Justice is now, on a case verdict that’s already been made that said that the 17-year-old girl had the right to the abortion and the government would need to pay for this, and they rejected a governmental solution to turn it over to a private company.

The court said she has the right to the abortion and the right to taxpayer funds to fund it. And then, immediately, the next day, she went and got the abortion, even though the lawyers had said, on record, that it would not take place for two days.

The Justice Department has gone to the court to vacate the ruling. Why? They’ve stated two reasons. No. 1 is they want to wipe out the precedent that the taxpayers have to affirm a person’s right to kill their child by paying for it. That is a violation of the laws governing the, quote/unquote, “right to abortion” in our nation.

Secondly, they have done it to bring to bear the misconduct of the ACLU lawyers because they misrepresented and they lied and, therefore, they are seeking for them to be either disciplined or dismissed from their credentials, that is, to be disbarred.

The precedent does need to be confronted because we must not get into a situation in which there’s a precedent of taxpayer money funding the death industry of abortion. And then, secondly, we need to hold the ACLU lawyers to their ethical obligations.

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, our final story is out of Town Hall. We all know that Bernie Sanders is pushing hard for single-payer healthcare, although he has a hard time proving how it is going to be paid for. Even The Washington Post said that the high costs cannot be overcome. It’s a trainwreck for the working poor, they said.

I want to point out, in this one story, though, an Ontario doctor has now found out that, for one of her patients in Canada to see a specialist, a neurologist, the wait time is four and a half years.

DR. REEDER: Accessibility in a socialist system is a walking joke. They can’t get into see a neurologist in Canada for four years. Tell me how that’s going to help you when you’ve got a brain tumor.

It is demonstrable that the care that is delivered, the technology that’s developed and the progress in research is totally undermined when you go to a socialist system and you lose out on competition and entrepreneurial dynamics built into the medical enterprise.

And then, No. 3, the cost factor goes out of the roof. It is beyond any expectations of what begins to happen, yet, we continually move toward the socialist offer, thinking, “Oh, it’s free.” Nope, wait until you see what happens to your taxes.

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, our theme today is promises made and promises broken. How does the Christian react to these stories?

DR. REEDER: You do not depend upon man and you do not depend even upon man’s goodwill. We have to function with each other and we have to treat each other with dignity and respect but there is only one who has made a covenant with promises and vows and has kept the vows – and the promises are “Yes” and “Amen” because He has kept those vows – and that’s the God of Glory and the covenant is the covenant of grace, whereby Jesus Christ fulfilled the holiness of God and kept the oath of God, “I will save my people.”

And, on the cross, He paid for all the sins of all of His people so you can have everlasting life. And, with that security that God has delivered on His promises and His Son, in whom all of the promises of God are “Yes” and “Amen,” that’s what allows you to live in a world where men and women constantly renege on their promises for self-absorption, self-advancement and self-gratification.

And you also live in the world where Christians imperfectly, but purposefully, try to imitate their Savior and, when we promise something, we say what we mean, mean what we say and never be mean when we say it.

Dr. Harry L. Reeder III is the Senior Pastor of Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham.

This podcast was transcribed by Jessica Havin. Jessica is editorial assistant for Yellowhammer News. Jessica has transcribed some of the top podcasts in the country and her work has been featured in a New York Times Bestseller.

2 hours ago

A second former Prattville police officer sentenced for theft

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall on Friday announced that former Prattville police officer John Wayne McDaniel Jr. has been sentenced for conspiracy to commit burglary, third-degree theft, second-degree theft of prescription medicine and criminal impersonation of a police officer.

McDaniel was sentenced in Autauga County Circuit Court to ten years for each count, with the sentences being split for him to serve three years in community corrections rather than prison. The sentences will run concurrently.

“It is always serious and a sad betrayal of the public’s trust when a law enforcement officer breaks the law he has sworn to uphold,” said Marshall.

He continued, “In this case, the court considered that McDaniel acknowledged his wrongdoing, cooperated in the investigation, and assisted with information for the prosecution of others in related crimes. His sentence takes this into account, yet imposes strong controls to invoke his prison sentence if he fails to abide by the strict standards of the community corrections program.”

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In the community corrections program, defendants may serve their time outside of prison or jail but are held to stringent conditions and supervision, and upon any failure to comply are subject to immediately being sent to jail or prison.

McDaniel’s cooperation was an integral factor in the successful prosecution of another former Prattville police officer, Leon Todd Townson, who was sentenced on Monday to serve ten years in prison for first-degree insurance fraud and conspiracy to commit first-degree burglary and and three years for third-degree burglary. Townson’s sentences run concurrently.

McDaniel and Townson were both originally charged with breaking into a home in 2015, and Townson was also charged in 2017 with defrauding an insurance agency by filing a claim worth $190,000 using false information.

Marshall commended Assistant Attorney General John Kachelman of the office’s Criminal Trials Division for his exemplary work in bringing these cases to a successful conclusion. The Attorney General also applauded Special Agents of his Investigations Division and thanked the Prattville Police Department for their crucial role in the investigation and prosecution of the two cases.

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

3 hours ago

77-year-old identical twin sisters ‘serving up smiles’ at Alabama McDonald’s

A pair of 77-year-old identical twin sisters working at a Shelby County McDonald’s restaurant has customers saying, “I’m lovin’ it.”

Maryann Byrne and Alice Moore, the twins, are so popular that a customer called WBRC urging them to do a story about the sisters, who work at the location on Valleydale Road and the corner of Caldwell Mill Road.

Byrne and Moore do every task – from taking customers’ orders, to preparing food and pouring piping-hot cups of coffee – with genuine smiles that are contagious to co-workers and customers alike.

“Those two ladies are a breath of fresh air for all the people who come in here,” customer Rod Peeks told WBRC. “They’re just amazing.”

The sisters say it all comes down to them loving to serve others and caring about the people they interact with.

“The customers are gorgeous, they really are,” said Byrne. “They’re like your family members.”

“We like to make people happy. We like to please people. God made them and we need to please them,” added Moore.

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The story gets even better. The sisters get to work with another family member, as Moore’s daughter is the general manager of the restaurant.

“They’re my superstars and I love them to pieces. Please come in and see them,” Barbara Gibbs said about her mom and aunt.

Byrne calls her sister “the twin queen,” because Moore has a set of twins and her daughter Maria, the manager, gave birth to twin boys.

Watch the entire story below:

WBRC FOX6 News – Birmingham, AL

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

3 hours ago

Jefferson State Community College gets grant to improve biomedical training program

Gov. Kay Ivey has awarded Jefferson State Community College $220,817 to upgrade a program that trains students for jobs in the medical industry.

The grant, provided to the state by the Appalachian Regional Commission, will be used to purchase equipment, furniture and supplies to upgrade classroom and laboratory space for the college’s biomedical training program. The program trains students as biomedical equipment technicians in both manufacturing and healthcare.

“My administration has championed job growth in Alabama, and programs like this ensure that our workforce is trained and ready for those jobs,” Ivey said in a press release. “I am pleased that this ARC funding is helping to provide better opportunities for Alabama workers.”

Thirty-seven Alabama counties are members of the Appalachian Regional Commission and eligible for grant funds.

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4 hours ago

Congratulations to all of Alabama’s Congressional delegation on their re-elections

[WRITER’S NOTE: Before I get started, let me just short-circuit 90 percent of the response to what I am about to say is going to get: No, fivethirtyeight.com was not totally wrong about the presidential election. They said Hillary Clinton was going to win the popular vote, and she did.

If you are an elected Congressman from Alabama, you are good to go in November, according to FiveThirtyEight.

The least likely winner is Congresswoman Martha Roby, who is still expected to brutalize her opponent.

This should surprise absolutely no one. Alabama is still a red state. The only blue district in the state is a gerrymandered mess that includes Birmingham and Montgomery, so Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Birmingham) didn’t even draw an opponent.

The bigger story from fivethirtyeight.com is that their analysis shows two things:

1. Republicans are projected to lose, but it’s not impossible (this is better than the chance they gave Trump)

2. There are far more Solid D (188) seats than Solid R (146) seats, that means more seats for Republicans to defend, and that means less money for each one.

This could be a tough year for Republicans, but all is not lost yet.

@TheDaleJackson is a contributing writer to Yellowhammer News and hosts a conservative talk show  from 7-11 am weekdays on WVNN

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5 hours ago

See where Alabama schools rank in Princeton Review’s list of best colleges

The Princeton Review has released their trademark list of the “Best 384 Colleges” for 2019 and three Alabama schools made the cut.

To compile their latest edition, which is the 27th annual, the Princeton Review interviewed 138,000 students and examined the relevant data on the nation’s colleges.

See which Alabama institutions are on the list, and why, below:

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(Note that the following sub-rankings are only done for top 20 schools in each category)

Auburn University

Best Athletic Facilities – #2
Future Rotarians and DAR – #14
Happiest Students – #19
Students Pack the Stadiums – #5
Their Students Love These Colleges – #18
Town-Gown Relations are Great – #7

Academics, on a scale of 1-99: 75

Read more about Auburn’s inclusion here.

The University of Alabama

Best Athletic Facilities – #1
Best College Dorms – #13
Best-Run Colleges – #11
Lots of Greek Life – #5
Most Active Student Governments – #8

Academics, on a scale of 1-99: 77

Read more about UA’s inclusion here.

The University of Alabama at Birmingham

UAB’s post-graduate programs really push it over the top as a premier high-education institution.

The Princeton Review highlighted UAB by saying, “At the University of Alabama at Birmingham, professors and administrators ‘care about you.'” They also boast a relatively low student-to-faculty ratio.

Academics, on a scale of 1-99: 67

Read more about UAB’s inclusion here.

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn