The Wire

  • New tunnel, premium RV section at Talladega Superspeedway on schedule despite weather

    Excerpt:

    Construction of a new oversized vehicle tunnel and premium RV infield parking section at Talladega Superspeedway is still on schedule to be completed in time for the April NASCAR race, despite large amounts of rainfall and unusual groundwater conditions underneath the track.

    Track Chairman Grant Lynch, during a news conference Wednesday at the track, said he’s amazed the general contractor, Taylor Corporation of Oxford, has been able to keep the project on schedule.

    “The amount of water they have pumped out of that and the extra engineering they did from the original design, basically to keep that tunnel from floating up out of the earth, was remarkable,” Lynch said.

  • Alabama workers built 1.6M engines in 2018 to add auto horsepower

    Excerpt:

    Alabama’s auto workers built nearly 1.6 million engines last year, as the state industry continues to carve out a place in global markets with innovative, high-performance parts, systems and finished vehicles.

    Last year also saw major new developments in engine manufacturing among the state’s key players, and more advanced infrastructure is on the way in the coming year.

    Hyundai expects to complete a key addition to its engine operations in Montgomery during the first half of 2019, while Honda continues to reap the benefits of a cutting-edge Alabama engine line installed several years ago.

  • Groundbreaking on Alabama’s newest aerospace plant made possible through key partnerships

    Excerpt:

    Political and business leaders gathered for a groundbreaking at Alabama’s newest aerospace plant gave credit to the formation of the many key partnerships that made it possible.

    Governor Kay Ivey and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event which celebrated the construction of rocket engine builder Blue Origin’s facility in Huntsville.

9 mins ago

Calhoun youth dove hunt draws largest crowd yet

(David Rainer/Contributed)

Tucked in the foothills of the Appalachians in north Alabama was a sight to behold: More than 80 youngsters were gathered in one of the many fields carved into the rolling hills, and not a single eye was glued to a smartphone.

Other activities occupied their minds as the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources’ Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries (WFF) Division readied the crowd of young hunters, parents and mentors for the annual Calhoun County Youth Dove Hunt.

1214

Before the hunt started at noon, the young participants had their choice of shooting Daisy BB guns at the National Wild Turkey Federation-sponsored shooting range, learning to throw a hatchet, or testing their skills at the ever-popular cornhole toss. Those activities preceded a hamburger-hot dog lunch and safety instructions from WFF Conservation Enforcement Officer Ben Kiser, who along with WFF’s Ginger Howell went to great lengths to continue the hunt’s tradition as one of the top youth events in Alabama’s great outdoors.

Kiser and Howell engaged the nearby Calhoun County communities to support the event, and the response was sufficient to supply plenty of food and drink as well as an abundance of outdoors-related door prizes.

“Ever since I became a game warden, my goal has been to introduce youth to what Alabama has to offer in the outdoors, whether it’s hunting or fishing, getting them off of cellphones or the internet and putting them in a treestand or blind, in a dove field or fishing on the bank or in a boat,” Kiser said. “I want to show them there’s more to offer instead of sitting at home in front of a TV or computer screen.

“I remember growing up hunting with my dad. There may be a lot going on in these kids’ lives, and this is a way to get them away for a few hours.”

Kiser and Howell want to make the event sufficiently special that the youngsters will never forget the day.

“If we can bring kids out here and give them a door prize or present, we can help them make a memory,” Kiser said. “Then a few years down the road, when they get old enough to hunt and fish on their own, they will remember this and be more likely to buy that license and hunt or fish. Our Department (Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources) depends on getting people out here and being involved in what we do for a living.”

Kiser and Howell started working on the youth dove hunt about three months ago, reaching out to the landowner to get the fields prepared for the hunt as well as local retailers who might be willing to support the event.

“We started going around to local businesses and vendors, people who had expressed interest in helping us put on one of these events,” Kiser said. “We ended up getting three shotguns donated, two of which were donated to us from Exile Armory, a Yeti cooler, several Moultrie game cameras and other items. We got a lot of help from the ACEOA (Alabama Conservation Enforcement Officers Association) and Superior GMC-Cadillac in Anniston. They were big in making this event bigger than last year. We got items that we thought the kids would be more apt to use instead of what the adults would use. Then we got out and hit the pavement. We put up signs everywhere – in store windows, Jack’s, gun shops, Academy. We posted the hunt on social media. I talked to several people who had been here before and got it out by word of mouth. There’s a lot that goes into an event like this.”

Howell added, “We made sure we had plenty of food, and we made sure every youth here got a door prize. This hunt allows families to spend some quality time together and bond.”

The local NWTF chapter brought its shooting sports trailer with a blow-up BB-gun range and a hatchet-throwing game. The BB-gun range introduces the young hunters to gun safety and keeps them engaged.

Obviously, the first step in holding a youth dove hunt is to secure a place to hunt, which is where Randy Martin of Calhoun County stepped forward.

“I love to see all these young’uns come out here,” Martin said. “I think we live in a culture where these kinds of events can help establish a moral foundation and bring them into God’s creation so they can get a little different perspective on life. We’re trying to use our farm in ways that not only benefit us but allow others to benefit. That’s why we’re holding this dove shoot. I feel like my part is the easy part. The organization and fundraising that Ben and Ginger take care of is what takes all the time. I’m very appreciative of these people. I think they have the same goals for the youth that we do.”

One of the adult hunters, WFF Enforcement Section Chief Matt Weathers, brought his son and his son’s friend to the youth hunt. Weathers relayed an interesting incident that occurred on the way to the hunt.

“We stopped at Jack’s for breakfast on the way up here,” Weathers said. “The two little boys with me were both wearing camouflage. We were sitting there eating. After they finished, they got up to go to the bathroom. One of the guys sitting in the booth behind us, an older gentleman, was getting up to leave, and he turned around and came back to me. He said, ‘You know, you don’t see little boys wearing camouflage anymore. Most daddies don’t take their kids hunting anymore.’ I told him that we were going to a youth dove hunt in Calhoun County, and this daddy takes kids hunting, some that are not mine.”

Weathers said the conversation progressed into a discussion about how priorities are changing as well as the role of the father in families.

“He was in his late 70s, and he talked about how he had taken his children hunting all their lives,” Weathers said. “From my standpoint, I talk about that a lot. I bring that subject up, but seldom does the public come to me with the subject that I’m so familiar with. The gentleman had no idea I was the Game Warden Chief. He just knew he and I shared the same views on passing our hunting heritage along. I thought that was an interesting conversation on my way to a youth dove hunt where the sole focus is to introduce the next generation to hunting.”

Each registered adult hunter was required to bring one or two youths 15 years old or younger. The adult, who was allowed to join in the hunt, had to remain within 30 feet of each youth at all times when the participants reached the dove field.

Although the weather was hot for a typical mid-September day in north Alabama, the young hunters spread around two fields, some near round hay bales, and watched the skies for any sign of doves.

Although the doves waited very late to fly because of the heat, the hunters were able to shoot enough to make the shotshell manufacturers happy, not to mention those 80-plus young hunters.

The youth dove hunt program has provided a continued opportunity for youngsters to enter the ranks of hunters. This hunt highlights only one of the 28 youth dove hunts hosted by the Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries across the state. If you’re interested in attending one of them, visit https://publichunts.dcnr.alabama.gov/Public/AvailableHunts/6 for a list of youth dove hunts still available. But don’t hesitate because very few hunts remain.
David Rainer is an award-winning writer who has covered Alabama’s great outdoors for 25 years. The former outdoors editor at the Mobile Press-Register, he writes for Outdoor Alabama, the website of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

14 hours ago

Bradley Byrne campaign announces launch of ‘Farmers for Bradley’ coalition

(U.S. Representative Bradley Byrne/Facebook)

Bradley Byrne’s campaign for United States Senate announced Friday that key leaders from Alabama’s agriculture community have launched a “Farmers for Bradley” coalition to support Byrne.

Agriculture remains the top industry in Alabama, and we need a Senator who will not only vote right, but who will actually fight tooth and nail to support our farmers, landowners, and agribusinesses,” Byrne said in a statement. “To have such a strong group of agriculture leaders backing our campaign is a real honor and a testament to the hard work we have done over the years to support our Alabama farmers.”

Both State Senator Andrew Jones (R-Centre) and Mark Kaiser from Baldwin County, who lead the coalition, believe Byrne will fight for farmers in the Senate.

173

“When I first met Bradley, it was clear he is a fighter,” Jones said. “Agriculture is a very difficult industry with a wide range of challenges, so it is so important we have a U.S. Senator who will work with our farmers and leaders at the state level to make life a little easier.”

Kaiser echoed Jones’ comments and said, “Bradley just gets it when it comes to agriculture. He has taken the time to learn about the various issues impacting Alabama’s agriculture community, and he has used that knowledge to fight for us in Washington. Bradley doesn’t just talk the talk, he walks the walk.”

“Bradley has an impressive record as a champion for Alabama’s farmers,” a press release stated. “From supporting the Farm Bill to cutting bureaucratic red tape, Bradley has always fought to ensure the farm economy remains stable and fair. Bradley plans to continue the fight for farmers by seeking a seat on the Senate Agriculture Committee.”

Kyle Morris also contributes daily to Breitbart News. You can follow him on Twitter @RealKyleMorris.

15 hours ago

Did a police officer go for his gun or not? This is not an appropriate resolution to the Alabama A&M/UNA issue

(Pxhere, YHN)

Last weekend, the Alabama A&M Bulldogs upset the University of North Alabama Lions in a football game that most of you didn’t know even took place by a 31-24 score.

After the game, a series of allegations were made that were pretty serious and require further investigation.

Here are the problems Bulldogs’ head coach Connell Maynor pointed out:

594

  • “It ain’t 1959, we don’t have to put up with that type stuff.”
  • Alabama A&M received no free tickets or tickets to sell to the public
  • Alabama A&M player weren’t allowed access to the field prior to two hours before the game
  • Alabama A&M coaches were told to have their credentials hanging around their neck, UNA coaches had theirs around their waist
  • His assistant coaches were not able to use the elevator right away because of fans being given priority
  • “There was too much stuff that went on off the field, behind the scenes that was not professional on their part at all.”
  • “And we were very very disappointed in the way they treated us, in every aspect off the field.”
  • The teams will not play again

And most importantly, according to the Florence Times Daily:

Maynor also alleged an incident occurred in which a police officer put “his hand on his gun” and saying “Did you hear what he said?” during an argument between a coach and security.

Whoa… what?

A police officer put his hand on his weapon during an argument with staff?

Wait.

A police officer put his hand on his weapon during an argument with the staff of a Historically Black College and University at a football game?

Why don’t we know what agency this officer was with?

His name?

The name of the coach involved?

This is a serious allegation and is, no doubt, a racially tinged accusation.

There must be an investigation of this entire situation.

Only, there will not be an investigation. Alabama A&M has made it clear neither the coach nor the school will be commenting further, which is insane.

Alabama A&M’s head coach is alleging some pretty serious stuff, including a police officer going for his gun over a coach’s access to part of a football stadium.

Instead, we got a statement from the two schools that says the following:

“Alabama A&M University and the University of North Alabama are vital educational institutions that serve the North Alabama region and beyond. Both institutions are committed to working collaboratively to advance our respective missions. We are separated by 76 miles; however, we remain united in ensuring the viability of our institutions and the success of our students, faculty, staff, alumni, friends, and programs, both academically and athletically. As part of that collaborative commitment, both universities have been in communication since Monday about the recent UNA-AAMU football game at Braly Stadium to decide what, if any, next steps are necessary. Both institutions are committed to providing a safe, accommodating, friendly, and inclusive environment. We remain dedicated to furthering our relationship and enjoying a bright future, both on and off the field.”

The highlight is this (bold text added for emphasis):

As part of that collaborative commitment, both universities have been in communication since Monday about the recent UNA-AAMU football game at Braly Stadium to decide what, if any, next steps are necessary.

To put it bluntly, that statement is complete garbage.

Was there racism or not?

Was this just normal rivalry stuff?

Was there an effort by the University of North Alabama to behave in a way that Alabama A&M’s coach, staff, and players led to these words by a state employee about another state institution?

Is Coach Maynor lying?

If he is, why is he still employed?

If he is not, why don’t we know what actually happened?

Why is this police officer still on the job?

Shame on everyone involved in this situation, especially the leadership of these universities who have no interest in getting to the bottom of what actually happened.

Dale Jackson is a contributing writer to Yellowhammer News and hosts a talk show from 7-11 am weekdays on WVNN

15 hours ago

OIG report: ‘Serious issues,’ possible misuse of taxpayer dollars at Alabama Women’s Business Center locations

(PIxabay, YHN)

The U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) has released a report identifying “serious” material deficiencies with Women’s Business Center, Inc., an Alabama-based recipient of the SBA’s Women’s Business Center (WBC) grant program.

Women’s Business Center, Inc. is responsible for operating two WBCs, located in Mobile and Brewton.

In the course of the OIG’s audit of SBA’s oversight of the nationwide WBC program, Women’s Business Center, Inc. denied OIG auditors access to both coastal Alabama center’s offices and records.

After issuing an administrative subpoena, the SBA OIG uncovered that both WBCs had actually been permanently closed since the fall of 2018 yet were still collecting federal government funds.

292

Further violations uncovered by the OIG included inadequately staffing centers, late and unpaid payroll, a major potential conflict of interest and failure to maintain an adequate financial management system and audited financial statements.

The OIG’s report concluded:

We determined that the Recipient has materially violated federal statutes, regulations, and the terms and conditions of its cooperative agreements. Its lack of required financial systems, records, and policies, and inability to pay its obligations, maintain open and available facilities and service hours, and staff its WBCs with full-time program directors indicates serious issues in the Recipient’s ability to operate and fulfill the WBC program requirements. We have deemed the documentation the Recipient has provided to us to be insufficient and incomplete. The Recipient denied access to OIG, an independent, authorized oversight entity, and disregarded governing federal regulations and terms and conditions of its cooperative agreements.

These findings impel SBA to take prompt corrective action to protect taxpayers’ dollars and help to ensure the integrity of the WBC program. SBA should pursue actions including, but not limited to, suspension, termination, and nonrenewal of the Recipient’s cooperative agreements, as well as suspension and debarment of the Recipient and its personnel.

In a statement reacting to the OIG report, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), chairman of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, said, “The gross lack of oversight uncovered in the SBA OIG’s most recent management advisory is incredibly troubling.”

“SBA must take action to remedy the numerous deficiencies identified and enact the Office of Inspector General’s recommendations immediately,” he added. “I appreciate the Office of the Inspector General’s diligence in this matter and look forward to its swift resolution.”

Read the OIG report here.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

16 hours ago

Ivey back in Montgomery after outpatient procedure ‘went well and as planned’

(YHN, Gov. Kay Ivey/Flickr)

Governor Kay Ivey on Friday underwent an initial outpatient procedure at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) for early-stage lung cancer.

This followed her Thursday announcement that disclosed the next day’s procedure and radiation treatments to follow.

In a statement, Ivey’s press secretary, Gina Maiola, said, “The governor’s outpatient procedure today at UAB went well and as planned.”

“She is back in Montgomery and looks forward to returning to her regular schedule next week,” Maiola concluded.

33

RELATED: Support pours in after Ivey announces cancer diagnosis — ‘No step too high for a high-stepper’

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

Is your business surviving or thriving?

According to the Small Business Administration, there over 20 million small businesses in the United States. Sadly, less than 35% of them will still be around in 10 years. Even worse, with the right kind of help, many could have been saved.  Armed with over five decades of proven success, Team Delta 3 is ready to teach you to grow your business.  Use code Yellowhammer2019 to register today.

1
17 hours ago

Court: First Amendment protects ‘hate group’ label

(U.S. Courts/YouTube)

A federal judge says a liberal advocacy group has a First Amendment right to call a Christian ministry a hate group for its opposition to homosexuality.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson threw out a lawsuit filed by the Florida-based Coral Ridge Ministries Media Inc. against the Southern Poverty Law Center of Montgomery, Alabama.

99

The ministry sued the law center, Amazon and others in 2017 because it wasn’t included in a program that lets Amazon customers donate to nonprofit groups.

The suit says the refusal was because the law center had labeled the ministry a hate group for its stance against homosexual behavior.

The judge ruled Thursday that the liberal watchdog group has a free-speech right to make the claim.

His ruling didn’t address whether the ministry is a hate organization.
 (Associated Press, copyright 2019)

Sign-up now for our daily newsletter and never miss another article from Yellowhammer News.

18 hours ago

‘Breaking record after record’: Alabama shattering employment milestones monthly

(Gov. Ivey/Flickr)

Alabama continues to set new jobs-related records and now boasts the largest over-the-year unemployment rate drop in the United States.

Alabama Department of Labor Secretary Fitzgerald Washington on Friday announced that the Yellowhammer State has yet again set a new record low unemployment rate, along with four additional milestones.

The state’s preliminary, seasonally adjusted August unemployment rate was 3.1%, down from July’s then-historic rate of 3.3%, and well below August 2018’s rate of 3.9%.

584

August’s rate represented 2,184,511 employed persons, also a new record high, measuring 68,033 more than last year’s count and 12,757 more than last month’s count.

In a statement, Governor Kay Ivey said, “Not only can we be proud of the fact that Alabama is breaking record after record; but we can also be proud that more of our good men and women are gaining employment.”

The Yellowhammer State has now matched or surpassed the national annual job growth rate for the past seven months.

“Alabama has made significant progress regarding our economy,” Ivey added. “Not only are we putting people to work, but their earnings are increasing, and our industries are growing. Even with all this headway, we realize we must continue exhausting our efforts to make sure that all Alabamians who want a job have a job, and we won’t stop until we achieve that goal.”

August’s historic numbers came after Alabama broke four records the month previous and five in June.

“Along with this brand-new record low unemployment rate, Alabama continues to break other records as well,” said Washington.

“More people are working in Alabama than ever before, a record we’ve broken every single month this year,” he continued. “More than 68,000 Alabamians are working today that weren’t last year, and that’s great news. Fewer people are unemployed in Alabama than ever before, and our workforce is larger than it’s ever been, with consecutive growth for the past eight months.”

August’s unemployment rate represents 70,652 unemployed persons, a new record low, down from 75,101 in July and down from 86,212 in 2018.

The civilian labor force increased in August to a record high 2,255,163, up 8,308 from July’s count and up 52,473 from August 2018.

“Additionally, our jobs count reached a record high for the fourth time this year, gaining more than 37,000 jobs over the year, representing a job growth percentage of 1.8%, which, yet again, surpassed the nation’s job growth – all while Alabamians are also seeing growth in their earnings,” concluded Washington.

Year over year, wage and salary employment grew by 37,300, with gains in the professional and business services sector (+9,900); the leisure and hospitality sector (+6,600); and the trade, transportation and utilities sector (+5,200), among others.

Wage and salary employment grew in August by 5,900. Monthly gains were seen in the government sector (+5,300); the professional and business services sector (+3,000); and the trade, transportation and utilities sector (+1,900), among others.

Average weekly earnings increased $27.05 since August 2018 and $8.97 since July.

The rising tide is lifting boats across Alabama, too.

All 67 counties saw their unemployment rates decrease over the year, and 66 of 67 counties saw their rates decrease or remain the same over the month.

Counties with the lowest unemployment rates in August were Shelby County at 2.1%; Marshall and Madison Counties at 2.3%; and Morgan, Limestone and Elmore Counties at 2.4%.

Counties with the highest unemployment rates were Wilcox County at 6.9%, Clarke County at 5.9% and Greene County at 5.8%.

While still the highest, Wilcox County’s unemployment rate is down 3.1% over-the-year.

Major cities with the lowest unemployment rates were Vestavia Hills at 1.8%; Northport and Homewood at 1.9%; and Alabaster and Hoover at 2.0%.

Major cities with the highest unemployment rates were Selma at 6.5%, Prichard at 5.5% and Anniston at 4.1%.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment at Jefferson County Courthouse

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and their members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, September 23, 10:00 am to 10:30 am at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 716 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. N #251, Birmingham, AL.  For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

1
20 hours ago

Jones: Claim I called for Kavanaugh impeachment ‘a complete mischaracterization’ — ‘We need to just move on’

(Screenshot/YouTube)

Senator Doug Jones (D-Mountain Brook) says it is time to move on from any discussions regarding the impeachment of U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh that stem from allegations in a New York Times report, which has since been revised by editors given the incomplete information in the initial report.

On Sunday, Jones had said during an MSNBC appearance if Kavanaugh lied to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his confirmation hearings, impeachment could be a consideration. However, in a later appearance also on MSNBC, he later ruled out impeachment after The New York Times issued a clarification about the piece.

During his TV media call on Thursday, Jones called the premise of ever being a supporter of Kavanaugh’s impeachment a “complete mischaracterization.”

290

“That’s a complete mischaracterization of what I said when those allegations came out in The New York Times,” Jones explained. “I said perjury is a serious allegation, and judges have been removed for perjury. But I didn’t say — I didn’t call for impeachment inquiry at that time. Since that Sunday, when I was asked about it, The New York Times retracted that. I think I’ve made it pretty clear since then that I don’t think an impeachment inquiry would be appropriate.”

Jones went on to express his concerns about the confirmation process but insisted that it was time to move on from the discussion of an impeachment inquiry.

“What did concern me about this — and I’ve said this consistently is that I thought the process that we went through with the Kavanaugh nomination was a flawed process,” Jones added. “It was not a process that was full, fair and complete. And I think that is a mistake. It is a mistake that the Judiciary Committee made and it sets a bad precedent. We just saw as part of this that a U.S. Senator’s letter concerning a potential witness was apparently ignored. That’s not a good thing.”

“So, I have criticized the process,” he continued. “I don’t think it was good. I think it was flawed. But at the same time, I don’t think what I’ve seen now would rise to anything involving an impeachment inquiry. We need to just move on. We’ve got a lot to do in the Senate and the House these days — Iran, gun violence, you name it. We just need to move on.”

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University, the editor of Breitbart TV and host of “The Jeff Poor Show” from 2-5 p.m. on WVNN in Huntsville.

22 hours ago

7 Things: Governor Ivey has lung cancer, ICE releases two in Birmingham, racial issues maybe not at play in A&M/UNA controversy and more …

(Governor's Office/Hal Yeager)

7. Trump is going to protect his tax returns 

  • After a federal judge halted a California law demanding President Donald Trump turn over his tax returns, the president has filed a lawsuit in an effort to protect his tax returns over efforts from Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance to subpoena Trump’s accounting firm, Mazars USA, for the last eight years of Trump’s personal and corporate tax returns.
  • Trump’s lawsuit claims that the subpoena for his tax returns is unconstitutional. Trump’s legal team is also asking for a court order that would grant a “permanent injunction staying the subpoena while the president is in office.”

6. Eight now dead from vaping-related illness

591

  • The moral panic around the issue of vaping continues as the state of Missouri has announced, “A Missouri man in his mid-40s died this week at Mercy Hospital St. Louis due to an illness associated with the use of e-cigarettes.”
  • The state’s health department led many to speculate this latest death is related to black market vaping projects with THC by stating, “This is an unfortunate case of a young man with no prior lung illness who started vaping because of chronic pain issues.”

5. Birmingham City Schools investigating after a student was left on the bus 

  • Earlier this week, a special needs high school student that attends a Birmingham city school was left unattended on the bus during the whole school day, and now the school system has said they will “review safety measures” to prevent similar incidents in the future.
  • The company contracted by BCS, School Transportation Solutions, didn’t comment on the situation, but this is obviously a case where a driver didn’t check the bus after dropping students off, which is a requirement of all bus drivers in Jefferson County. Bus drivers for special needs students are also supposed to have an aid with them that double-checks to ensure that no students are left on the bus.

4. Whistleblower complaint against Trump may have involved Ukraine

  • Sources have told the Washington Post that the whistleblower complaint surrounding President Donald Trump is related to a desire for an investigation into the actions of former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter in Ukraine in exchange for military aid.
  • The source told the Post, “He was being excruciatingly careful about the language he used” when speaking to the foreign leader.” The president lawyer has said he did encourage Ukraine to investigate Biden.

3. Alabama A&M and UNA to work together 

  • Earlier this week, Alabama A&M’s head football coach Connell Maynor said that his team wasn’t treated well when they played the University of North Alabama, as well as suggesting that their poor treatment was racially motivated without much evidence or actual accusations.
  • In response, the schools have released a joint statement clarifying that they’re still deciding if any further action is necessary, and the statement just emphasized that the schools are “safe, accommodating, friendly, and inclusive.”

2. Birmingham residents released from ICE custody

  • In August, Marcos and Juan Baltazar were taken into custody because Juan had recently turned 18, which changed both Marcos and Juan’s immigration status, but as Marcos is a board member of Adelante Alabama Workers Center, Birmingham citizens drew attention to the case as they advocated for their release.
  • Marcos and Juan’s bond was paid through donations raised by Adelante, and the President of Adelante’s Board of Directors, Julia Calderon, said that this was an example of “how powerful our communities are when threatened and we made a clear statement to ICE that no matter how much they try to terrorize us, we will not back down,” but Marcos and Juan were only released on bond and not due to public pressure.

1. Governor Kay Ivey has lung cancer

  • On Thursday, Governor Kay Ivey sent out a statement announcing that she has been diagnosed with lung cancer, but that it’s “a tiny, isolated malignancy.” In her statement, she affirms that the cancer is “very treatable.”
  • Ivey also announced that she will be undergoing a procedure Friday morning “which will allow me to soon begin a series of specialized radiation treatments,” and she has guaranteed that her work as governor will continue as normal.

24 hours ago

Shelby warns military priorities ‘could be undermined’ by Senate Democrats

(Sen. Richard Shelby)

Senator Richard Shelby (R-AL), the powerful chairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, on Thursday warned that vital military and national security priorities “could be undermined” after Senate Democrats blocked consideration of the Fiscal Year 2020 defense appropriations bill the day prior.

Shelby’s remarks came during the committee’s markup of the FY 2020 bills for the appropriations subcommittees on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies (T-HUD); Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies; and Financial Services and General Government.

All three bills were subsequently reported favorably out of the committee via unanimous votes, with Shelby declaring that “these bills prioritize the needs of the people of Alabama and the nation.”

However, that came after Shelby used his lofty perch to stand up for American military interests, including the brave men and women who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. Shelby is also the chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee.

116

“Yesterday on the floor, we tried to bring up the first package of appropriations bills sent over by the House,” he explained, per prepared remarks. “Unfortunately, our Democratic colleagues would not allow us to do so.”

“Because we were not allowed to proceed, our military’s efforts to plan deliberately in countering Russian and Chinese influence could be undermined,” Shelby warned. “Because we were not allowed to proceed, our plans to provide soldiers with the largest pay increase in a decade will be delayed.”

He emphasized, “Funding our military in a timely manner should not just be a Republican priority; it should be an American priority.”

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

1 day ago

More milestones for Alabama-managed SLS — ‘Backbone for deep space transportation’

(NASA/Steven Seipel)

The Space Launch System (SLS), set to be the world’s most powerful rocket ever, has achieved more major assembly milestones in recent days.

On Thursday, NASA engineers at the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, along with Boeing technicians, connected the last of the five sections of the SLS rocket core stage. This marked the finalization of assembling and joining the rocket’s main structural components.

On SLS’s first flight, the core stage will produce 2 million pounds of thrust to send Artemis I and NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon.

The historically powerful SLS is managed at Huntsville’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

579

In a statement, NASA SLS stages manager Julie Bassler said, “NASA has achieved a historic first milestone by completing the final join of the core stage structure for NASA’s Space Launch System, the world’s most powerful rocket.”

“Now, to complete the stage, NASA will add the four RS-25 engines and complete the final integrated avionics and propulsion functional tests. This is an exciting time as we finish the first-time production of the complex core stage that will provide the power to send the Artemis I mission to the Moon,” she advised.

Artemis will take man back to the Moon and the first woman to the surface of the Moon. The program is currently on schedule for a 2024 lunar mission and hopes to set the stage for future human travel to Mars.

SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts and supplies to the Moon in a single mission.

This fall, NASA will work with core stage lead contractor, Boeing, and the RS-25 engine lead contractor, Aerojet Rocketdyne, to attach the four RS-25 engines and connect them to the main propulsion systems inside the engine section, which was the last section of the core stage to be attached.

“Boeing expects to complete final assembly of the Artemis I core stage in December,” explained Jennifer Boland-Masterson, Boeing operations direct at Michoud.

The SLS team also achieved another recent milestone by completing structural testing for the stage’s liquid hydrogen tank. The testing confirmed that the structural design for the tank on the rocket’s initial configuration, called Block 1, can withstand extreme conditions during launch and flight.

Teams at Marshall Space Flight Center put a test version of the tank through the paces during 37 separate test cases that exceeded what engineers expect the SLS rocket to experience. The final test used 80,000 gallons of liquid nitrogen to simulate the cryogenic conditions, or extreme cold, that the liquid hydrogen tank will experience in flight, according to NASA.

Testing will continue later this year to show the tank’s structural design is adequate for future designs of the vehicle as it evolves to a Block IB configuration and missions with even greater forces.

In addition to providing propellant and power to get the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft to space, the core stage houses the flight computers and avionics components that control the first 8 minutes of flight.

The avionics system, including the flight computers, completed integrated system level qualification testing showing the components all work together to control the rocket in the Software Integration and Test Facility (SITF) at Marshall. The next step is to test the flight software with all the ground system software, Orion and launch control in the Systems Integration Laboratory at Marshall.

“NASA and our contractor teams are making tremendous progress on every aspect of manufacturing, assembling and testing the complex systems needed to land American astronauts on the lunar surface by 2024,” Bassler concluded. “I am confident this hard work will result in a rocket that can provide the backbone for deep space transportation to the Moon and ultimately to Mars.”

Read more here.

North Alabama also will play a leading role in other components of Artemis, including with the lunar Gateway and the new Human Landing System. Historic contributions to America’s space prowess are being made by several private sector partners in the Yellowhammer State, such as United Launch Alliance (ULA), Boeing and Dynetics.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

2 days ago

Ride to honor fallen Tuscaloosa PD’s Dornell Cousette scheduled for Sunday

(City of Tuscaloosa, Punishers LEMC T-Town Chapter Alabama/Facebook, PIxabay, YHN)

The Tuscaloosa chapter of the Punishers Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club plans to sponsor a motorcycle ride to honor Tuscaloosa Police Department Investigator Dornell Cousette, who lost his life in the line of duty Monday night.

The ride, which will begin at 1:00 p.m. on Sunday, will begin at Veterans Park in University Mall, include a pass by the Tuscaloosa Police Department and conclude back at Veterans Park.

Registration for the event will be held from noon until 1:00 pm, followed by a safety briefing before the ride begins.

102

Donations can be made on that day by those who decide to ride and even those who are not taking part in the ride. All donations made will go to Cousette’s family.

Donations can be made to the Cousette family through PayPal at @paypal.me/ttownpunishers.

According to a press release, the Punishers Motorcycle Club is “a brotherhood of law enforcement officers, court officers, correctional officers, and other justice system professionals; EMS, Firefighters, Military and like-minded individuals.”

On Wednesday night, to honor Cousette, the University of Alabama lit Bryant-Denny Stadium in blue.

Kyle Morris also contributes daily to Breitbart News. You can follow him on Twitter @RealKyleMorris.

2 days ago

Support pours in after Ivey announces cancer diagnosis — ‘No step too high for a high-stepper’

(Gov. Kay Ivey/Flickr)

Reaction poured in from around Alabama on Thursday afternoon after Governor Kay Ivey announced that she will undergo an outpatient procedure on Friday, soon to be followed by radiation treatments, after the early discovery of lung cancer.

Elected officials and politicians from across the Yellowhammer State — and the nation — offered heartfelt words of support and prayer for Ivey.

Lt. Governor Will Ainsworth (R-AL) tweeted, “Throughout her career, Kay Ivey has proven herself to be a strong and determined woman who will confront any obstacle placed in her path. The courage and tenacity she has shown in the past will serve her well in the challenge that lies ahead.”

“Throughout her treatment, Gov. Ivey will carry with her the prayers, thoughts, and well-wishes of millions of Alabamians, and those of my family and I will certainly be among them,” he concluded.

759

Public Service Commission President Twinkle Andress Cavanaugh (R-AL) stated, “My family and I are praying for Governor Ivey to beat this cancer. She is a strong, resilient leader who I know will take that same approach to her recovery.”

Secretary of State John Merrill (R-AL) said in a tweet, “Cindy and I would like to express our concern and offer our thoughts and prayers to Gov. Ivey as she prepares to battle cancer! She is a true leader and a proven winner who has been successful in many fights before! I’m confident that she will prevail in this one as well!”

Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston) tweeted, “Please join me in praying for [Governor Ivey]’s speedy recovery. Her leadership is unparalleled and I look forward to continuing to work with her for the people of Alabama.”

U.S. Rep. Martha Roby (AL-02) tweeted to Ivey, “Riley, Margaret, George, & I will be praying for you during this time. I’m thankful to call you a friend & grateful for your leadership.”

State Auditor Jim Zeigler (R-AL) stated, “As a cancer survivor myself from 2001, I know that early detection, treatment, and prayer can work. I am confident Gov. Ivey will have the best treatment available, and we have wonderful cancer programs in Alabama. Kay Ivey is one tough lady, and I am confident that the cancer will be the loser in this fight.”

Thursday’s news certainly transcended politics.

“Sending well wishes to [Governor Ivey] for a speedy and full recovery!” U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell (AL-07) tweeted.

State Rep. Chris Pringle (R-Mobile) even invoked a classic Ivey line to express his support for the governor and optimism for her full recovery.

Former South Carolina Governor and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley also extended to Ivey, “Prayers for strength and healing.”

In a statement, Alabama Republican Party Chair Terry Lathan said, “Governor Ivey’s announcement that she will be undergoing outpatient radiation for a malignant spot on her lung is met with great concern, but we are confident that the Steel Magnolia of Alabama will recuperate quickly.”

“We hope it is a great comfort to her that millions of Alabamians will lift her name up to the Lord’s ear during this time. We also should take this opportunity to be reminded of so many who have walked this challenging path. We believe Governor Ivey will tackle this moment with the tenacity, faith and grace she does with everything,” she concluded.

State Rep. Will Dismukes (R-Prattville) tweeted, “My whole family and I are going to add her to our prayers immediately, but Governor Ivey is made of equal parts grit and grace. This small malignancy her doctor found will be no match for her.”

Governor Phil Bryant (R-MS) tweeted, “Deborah and I offer our prayers of support for [Governor Ivey]. Kay is a dear friend and one of the finest leaders in America. Her strength and faith will bring her through this challenge. Godspeed Kay.”

Alabama House Speaker Mac McCutcheon (R-Monrovia) said in a tweet, “When it comes to fighting for what matters, Governor Ivey has proven time and time again that she is a tenacious warrior, and that same steely will and determination will be in full evidence as she begins her radiation treatments.”

“I know that all of the members of the Alabama House join me in asking for God’s healing hands to embrace our governor throughout her treatment and recovery,” he added.

U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) said in a statement, “Louise and I want to join all Alabamians in offering our prayers and support for Governor Ivey and her loved ones during this difficult time. We know she is in good hands with the world-class physicians at UAB.”

This article may be updated as more reaction comes in.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

2 days ago

This weekend’s comprehensive college football TV schedule

(YHN)

For a printable version, click here. Pro tip: Save the image below to your phone for quick and easy access all weekend.

(Note: All times are Central)

1
2 days ago

Wildfire burns about 500 acres in parched Alabama

(Pixabay, YHN)

A wildfire has burned about 500 acres of land in rural eastern Alabama, and there’s a statewide threat of additional blazes.

The Alabama Forestry Commission has spent two days fighting a large wildfire around Alpine in Talladega County.

101

The fire has already consumed about 500 acres, but the agency says no people or homes are in immediate danger.

About 120 fires have burned more than 1,000 acres of land in the state in the last week.

The state has issued a fire danger advisory for all 67 counties because of dry weather conditions.

Nearly half the state is currently abnormally dry, with severe droughts in Shelby County near Birmingham and Dale and Henry counties in southeastern Alabama.
 (Associated Press, copyright 2019)

Sign-up now for our daily newsletter and never miss another article from Yellowhammer News.

2 days ago

Ivey to undergo outpatient procedure with ‘very high rate of success’ after cancer discovered early

(Jeff Poor/YHN)

Governor Kay Ivey on Thursday announced that she will undergo an outpatient procedure at UAB on Friday after a recent routine exam revealed she had a spot on her lung.

After more testing, “a tiny, isolated malignancy” was confirmed, meaning the spot was indicative of cancer.

The procedure and subsequent radiation treatments are not expected to interfere with her duties as governor, Ivey said in a statement.

Ivey said “this was discovered early, and it is very treatable.”

406

She added that the procedure “has a very high rate of success” and expressed great confidence in Alabama being “home to some of the world’s leading physicians.”

The governor welcomes prayers and support from around the state.

Ivey’s full statement as follows: 

Throughout my life, I am constantly reminded that I have so much for which to be thankful; God has been incredibly gracious to me.

One of the highest honors you have given me is serving as your governor.

Because I always shoot straight with you, I want to share a recent challenge that has been placed in front of me.

Within the past few weeks, during a routine exam, my longtime family physician discovered a spot on my lung that was unusual. Additional tests confirmed that this was, indeed, a tiny, isolated malignancy.

The good news is I am one of the fortunate ones where this was discovered early, and it is very treatable.

The better news is Alabama is home to some of the world’s leading physicians. My team of doctors have assured me this treatment has a very high rate of success and will have a minimal impact on my schedule.

Tomorrow morning, I will travel to UAB for an outpatient procedure, which will allow me to soon begin a series of specialized radiation treatments. None of this will prevent me from continuing to serve as your governor and doing the work you elected me to do.

Naturally, I welcome your prayers and your support. Just as so many others who have been affected by cancer, I am confident of God’s plan and purpose for my life and feel extremely fortunate this was caught so early.

May God continue to bless each of you and the great state of Alabama.

Update 2:30 p.m.:

The governor also released a video message to the public.

Update 2:58 p.m.:

Dr. William P. Saliski, Jr. D.O. with the Montgomery Pulmonary Consultants provided Yellowhammer News with the following statement regarding Ivey:

“Governor Kay Ivey was referred to me to review an abnormal spot on her lung. A biopsy was performed and pathology results revealed a small, isolated malignancy. Upon consultation with our cancer team and reviewing all options available, Governor Ivey determined that these minimal radiation treatments are her preference. Governor Ivey has opted for the least invasive treatment which has an excellent cure rate. I expect her to make a full recovery.”

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

2 days ago

On this day in Alabama history: Alabama legislature ratified the 19th Amendment

(Encyclopedia of Alabama/Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Sept. 19, 1953

The fight for the right for women to vote officially ended in 1920 when Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. In Alabama, there was an active suffragist movement, led by the Alabama Equal Suffrage Association, but opposition by some Alabama groups resulted in the legislature not taking up the amendment, and after Tennessee signed on the issue was moot. Thirty-three years later, the legislature decided to “record its approval of extending the right of suffrage to women” and officially ratified the 19th Amendment. Although the Alabama Equal Suffrage Association dissolved in 1920, many of its leaders and members joined the newly founded League of Women Voters, which remains active today in Alabama elections.

14
2 days ago

Canfield elected chair of Alabama Commission on Artificial Intelligence, Waggoner vice-chair

(Alabama Department of Commerce, J. Waggoner/Facebook, YHN)

The Alabama Commission on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Associated Technologies recently held its inaugural meeting, at which commission members elected Alabama Department of Commerce Secretary Greg Canfield as chairman and State Senator Jabo Waggoner (R-Vestavia Hills) as vice-chairman.

The commission plans to schedule additional meetings over the next seven months, with all meetings being open to the public.

The members will deliver a report in May to Governor Kay Ivey and the Alabama Legislature, recommending strategies and policies on how AI and other emerging technologies will be of benefit to the Yellowhammer State’s economy.

In a statement on Thursday, Canfield explained the importance of the commission’s work.

717

“Artificial intelligence is a powerful, disruptive technology that has the potential to forever change the way we live our lives and how businesses across Alabama operate,” he emphasized.

“It’s critical that we understand how AI will bring about these sweeping changes, and this Commission will help us develop insights into what the future has in store for Alabama’s citizens and businesses,” Canfield concluded.

Waggoner spearheaded the legislative resolution that formed the commission. His leadership has been, and continues to be instrumental, in this process. The powerful chair of the Senate Rules Committee identified the goal of Alabama being on the cutting edge of AI research and job creation in the technology sector.

“We want Alabama to be a leader in AI research, innovation, technology start-ups, and technology jobs,” Waggoner stated. We believe that we are competitive with other states.”

He continued, “The Commission will look at how Alabama is positioned and ready for the opportunities of tomorrow. Those are some of the issues and questions this Commission is going to answer. We will meet with key business groups and different industry sectors to understand the impact of AI and automation on their industries.”

According to Waggoner, the commission will also examine how schools and universities can develop AI-educational programs, and investigate what privacy safeguards might be needed to protect consumers.

“We want Alabama’s education system in a place where we can equip students with AI-relevant skills through engineering and technology classes and apprenticeship programs,” he added. “As we promote innovation and educational readiness, we must also protect the privacy rights of citizens, and examine whether existing state laws are effective in regulating these emerging technologies. There’s a lot of work ahead.”

The commission will be divided up into five sub-committees, focused on the following:

  • state regulations, government oversight, and potential legislative action;
  • education and workforce development;
  • healthcare and medical services;
  • future and evolving industries, economic development, and research;
  • ethics, privacy and security.

The subcommittees will begin their work in mid-October.

State Senator Dan Roberts (R-Mountain Brook) was appointed to the commission by Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston). Roberts came away from the body’s initial meeting impressed at the experience and expertise of its membership.

“Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning are very complex subjects. Thankfully, I think we have some of the finest minds in our state working on this project. The sub committees that have been established will allow every person on the commission to hone in on their particular areas of expertise,” Roberts outlined.

The 25 members of the commission are as follows:

Greg Canfield – Secretary of Commerce (chairman)

Marty Redden – Acting secretary of the Alabama Office of Information Technology

Ivey’s appointees:

1. Dr. Hari Narayanan— Auburn

2. Dr. Gerry Dozier— Auburn

3. Dr. Jeff Carver – UA (Tuscaloosa)

4. Dr. Curt Carver – UAB

5. Dr. Alec Yasinac – USA

6. Dr. John Beck – UAH

7. Dr. James Cimino – UAB

8. Melvin Evans – Hand Arendall

9. Jim McLane – NaphCare

10. Jacob Kosoff – Regions Bank

Lt. Governor Will Ainsworth’s appointees:

Joshua Jones – StrategyWise

Dr. Vicki Karolewics – Wallace State Community College

Speaker of the House Mac McCutcheon’s appointees:

Rep. Kirk Hatcher

Rep. Craig Lipscomb

Marsh’ appointees:

Sen. Jabo Waggoner (Vice-chair)

Sen. Dan Roberts

Non-Voting members appointed by the governor:

J. Michael Hardin – Provost & vice president at Samford University

John Brandt – Southern Company

Leonard Tillman – Balch & Bingham

Mike Rowell – Senior VP & CIO at ALFA Insurance

James Mizell – Senior account executive at Microsoft

Jason Asbury – NXTsoft

Dr. Syed Raza – Jefferson State Community College

An Alabama CEO, also a commission member, said artificial intelligence is on the cusp of transforming every industry.

“Artificial intelligence is rapidly changing every industry, and it is incredibly important for us as a state to think strategically about what that means to our economy,” advised Joshua Jones, CEO of Birmingham-based StrategyWise, an AI and data science consulting firm.

He concluded, “I applaud Senator Waggoner and Secretary Canfield for leading Alabama to be one of the first states to really address these opportunities and changing dynamics systematically. It sends a message to the rest of the U.S. that Alabama is serious about investing in our future, and we’re growing our tech-based ecosystem. For companies that want to leverage all that AI has to offer, we’re going to be prepared with a trained workforce, accommodating public policy, and a strong tech infrastructure.”

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

2 days ago

Decatur Mayor Tab Bowling open to Tennessee River toll bridge — If that moves freight, freight companies, truckers ‘would just be thrilled to do it’

(ALDOT, Jeff Poor/YHN)

For decades, traffic headed west from Huntsville and other points toward the Shoals has relied upon the Captain William J. Hudson “Steamboat Bill” Memorial Bridges to cross the Tennessee River into Decatur. Once traffic crosses that bridge, it either heads south on U.S. Highway 31 toward Hartselle and Cullman, or it makes a hard-right 90-degree turn on to U.S. Highway Alternate 72 and heads toward Muscle Shoals, Tuscumbia and Sheffield.

As the manufacturing base in northern Alabama expands, freight traffic is expected to increase at that intersection and make the turn west even more precarious for commuters and commercial traffic.

During an appearance on Huntsville radio’s WVNN on Wednesday, Decatur Mayor Tab Bowling discussed that spot and possible solutions for the future, which could include a tolling component.

512

“If you were to go now and sit in the Doubletree Hotel, which is where you’re talking about there where you make that turn to go to the Shoals, and just look at the amount of freight that comes in out of Memphis — Memphis is the distribution hub for America,” Bowling said on Wednesday’s broadcast of “The Jeff Poor Show.” “And that freight that comes out of Memphis, straight down [U.S. Highway Alternate] 72, and then it makes its way across our bridge and goes various routes from there — into Huntsville, Madison, Athens, gets on [Interstate] 65, has different directions it can go from there. But whenever we start producing a thousand cars a day, we have 4,000 employees plus the tiered suppliers who will be there. The amount of freight that will come in to take care of that I believe is going to double.”

Bowling noted the situation at the Hyundai facility near Montgomery as a sign of what is to come and commended Gov. Kay Ivey for the commitment to widen the existing Interstate 565 that connects Decatur and Huntsville.

“We visited the Hyundai facility manufacturing a thousand cars a day just south of Montgomery — just-in-time deliveries: batteries, tires, things of that nature — they receive a truck a minute,” he continued. “You think widening [Interstate] 565 is important? Heck yeah, it’s important. We’re thankful Gov. Ivey is going to get that done for us in the Spring of 2020.”

The Decatur mayor said the completion of a nearby overpass for Alabama Highway 20 remains his current top priority.  Once that is completed, Bowling said exploring the possibility of an alternate route over the Tennessee River would be appropriate.

“We’re working on an overpass on [Alabama] Highway 20 where Apple Lane Farms is,” he said. “That’s Decatur, and that’s a build grant that we received for $14 million from the Federal Highway Department. We’re very thankful for that. A lot of people made that happen. Once that project gets going, then we’ll start working on the other. But we want to be sure we do everything to make sure that project gets going first.”

As for the possibility of using tolls to finance a new bridge, Bowling said he expected that those moving freight would be “thrilled” if it expedited transit and that if it would improve commuter traffic on existing structures, it could be a possibility.

“If that moves freight, I would believe that the freight companies, the truckers would just be thrilled to do it,” Bowling explained. “If we were to take the trucks off of the [U.S.] Highway 31 bridges, I believe that our commuter traffic — it would be a lot easier to make that commute. And so, we’ll see what we can do. We’ll come up with a traffic plan. We’ll do traffic counts. Things to prove it out.”

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University, the editor of Breitbart TV and host of “The Jeff Poor Show” from 2-5 p.m. on WVNN in Huntsville.

2 days ago

Patriot Flag to be displayed in Mobile on Thursday to honor fallen American heroes

(Mitch Mendler/YouTube)

The Patriot Flag will be displayed at the USS Alabama in Mobile on Thursday, September 19.

According to WALA Fox 10, the flag is currently on a national tour intended to honor and thank fallen American men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation’s freedom and safety.

Measuring 28 by 60.5 feet and weighing 50 pounds, the Patriot Flag’s nationwide journey began on the 15th Anniversary of 9/11 when the flag was displayed at all three locations that were attacked by radical Islamic terrorists. The tour will end in 2021, on the 20th anniversary of the attacks.

119

On Thursday, the flag will be unfurled at 3:00 p.m. at Battleship Memorial Park. Mobile Fire-Rescue firefighters will assist.

You can read more about the tour and see photos from previous stops here.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

2 days ago

Byrne applauds Trump administration for rescinding WOTUS rule; Says Mobile Baykeeper ‘absolutely wrong’ about environmental threat

(Jeff Poor/YHN)

Last week, the Trump administration rescinded the Obama-era “Waters of the U.S.” (WOTUS) rule, which broadened the scope of “waters” protected by the Clean Water Act.

The rule faced numerous legal challenges and was decried by farmers as an overreach.

During an appearance on Huntsville radio’s WVNN on Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-Fairhope), a candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2020, applauded the Trump administration’s decision.

267

“There was a power grab by the Obama administration,” Byrne said on “The Jeff Poor Show.” “They wanted to take the traditional understanding about what is the water under the Clean Water Act that the EPA can regulate it and expand it to the point where if a farmer has two or three inches of standing water in their fields, all of a sudden the EPA tells them they can or can’t plant. That’s nonsense.”

“We actually had some legislation previously on it, but the Trump administration has just rescinded that rule,” he continued. “So we have gone back to a more common-sense understanding. I mean, a small pond in your yard is not something that should be regulated by the EPA. Some standing water in a big field is not something that should be regulated by the EPA.”

Byrne cited an AL(dot)com story quoting Mobile Baykeeper’s Casi Callaway decrying the move by the Trump administration and warning the impact that revoking the rule could have on the environment.

“Casi is a friend, but she is absolutely wrong about that,” Byrne remarked. “This is just a common-sense change going back to the way it has been for decades. It has worked fine for decades. I really appreciate the Trump administration making this change. And I understand why farmers and other people in other rural parts of Alabama felt so strongly about it.”

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University, the editor of Breitbart TV and host of “The Jeff Poor Show” from 2-5 p.m. on WVNN in Huntsville.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment at Jefferson County Courthouse

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and their members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, September 23, 10:00 am to 10:30 am at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 716 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. N #251, Birmingham, AL.  For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

1