2 months ago

‘Historic’ Byrne education proposal featured in Trump’s budget proposal

The education policy proposal introduced by Congressman Bradley Byrne (AL-1) last month was included in President Donald Trump’s budget proposal released this week.

Byrne and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) are sponsoring the Education Freedom Scholarships and Opportunity Act in their respective chambers. This pro-school choice legislation, which was developed with the consultation and support of Trump Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, will give students and parents nationwide the freedom to make educational decisions that are right for them.

The president’s proposed budget sets aside $5 billion annually in extra education funding to support the Education Freedom Scholarships and Opportunity Act.

In a statement, Byrne said, “I am proud to work with President Trump to advance our shared goal of expanding freedom and opportunity in education. The inclusion of our Education Freedom Scholarships and Opportunity Act in the President’s budget shows the Trump Administration’s commitment to our nation’s students and is yet another positive step moving us closer to improving education opportunities for students across the country.”

The Trump administration chose Byrne to carry this legislation, which is a key priority for the president, in the House.

Read more about the bill here.

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

7 mins ago

Alabama legislature passes bill to ensure accuracy in meat labeling

MONTGOMERY — The Alabama Senate on Thursday took steps to ensure that the definition of “meat” when applied to food labeling should only apply to products sourced from livestock on farms and ranches and harvested through processing; the bill clarifies that laboratory-grown products may not be labeled as meat, protecting Yellowhammer State consumers from potentially misleading packaging.

In a unanimous vote, the Senators passed HB 518, sponsored by State Rep. Danny Crawford (R-Athens) and State Sen. David Sessions (R-Grand Bay). The bill was previously passed by the House 97-2 and now heads to Governor Kay Ivey’s desk.

“This is proactive legislation to ensure clarity in food labeling. Around the country, there are more and more companies trying to market lab-grown products as meat, which is misleading since they aren’t derived from actual livestock production,” Sessions said in a statement.

Sessions pointed out that the nutritional and safety risks of foods developed in labs from animal cell cultures are still unknown.

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“These new lab-produced foods are, at best, synthetic meats, and their nutritional effects are unknown right now. Let’s see how the science develops through further research, and make a clear distinction between meat that is farm-raised on the one hand, and lab-based products on the other,” he advised.

The beef cattle industry represents a $2.5 billion industry in Alabama and is the number two agricultural commodity in the Yellowhammer State, with over 20,000 cattle farms. Beef continues to be a favorite protein among consumers worldwide, with exports of American beef representing an $8 billion industry by itself.

“The Alabama Cattlemen’s Association represents over 10,000 members across the state. As alternative proteins enter the marketplace in coming years, we think it is imperative that the integrity of all meat labels are protected and clear for consumers when they go to the meat case,” Erin Beasley, executive vice president of the Alabama Cattleman’s Association, commented.

She concluded, “The passage of this bill is a win-win for the consumers who love to buy beef, and the cattlemen who work hard to produce a high-quality product. We would like to thank the Alabama Legislature for the support of this bill, and especially Senator David Sessions and Representative Danny Crawford for carrying the bill.”

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

37 mins ago

Nine illegal aliens arrested in north Alabama in possible human trafficking racket

Law enforcement officers in DeKalb County this week arrested nine men, all reportedly illegal aliens, in connection with what they suspect is a human trafficking operation.

WAFF reported a DeKalb County patrol sergeant and K-9 deputy conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle from Texas late Tuesday night.

Upon further investigation, authorities reportedly determined that the suspects were in the United States illegally and were involved in a human trafficking operation.

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Department of Homeland Security investigators were called, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainers were placed on the suspects.

An investigation is still ongoing, but the office said it appears two of the men were traffickers.

However, there is debate over whether human “trafficking” or “smuggling” was occurring in this case.

David Pinkleton with the Alabama Human Trafficking Task Force explained that there is an crucial difference between trafficking and smuggling.

“When you think about the human trafficking it’s exploitation based,” he said. “You think about the sex trafficking, you think about the labor trafficking. There’s some forced fraud or coercion that’s actually involved.”

Smuggling would simply be the illegal act of getting these individuals into the United States covertly.

“[The] [s]muggling side is actually transportation-based,” Pinkleton advised.

Per WHNT, DeKalb County Sheriff Nick Welden released a statement on the arrests.

“This [was] a great bust on I-59,” the sheriff emphasized.

Welden said, “Due to the highways and interstates intersecting our county, it’s highly likely that human trafficking as well as illegal narcotics regularly move through. We have an opportunity to do our part as a department and help curb this illegal activity. Pro-active law enforcement can not only build a better county, but also help clean up our country. I’d like to commend these deputies on their dedication to this.”

Federal charges are pending, and the nine men are all in ICE custody.

The incident came right before the Alabama House passed three anti-human trafficking bills this week: HBs 261, 262 and 264.

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

1 hour ago

Planned Parenthood, ACLU do what Alabama legislature wanted, files lawsuit against abortion ban

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), ACLU of Alabama and Planned Parenthood Federation of America on Friday filed a federal lawsuit against Alabama’s newly signed into law HB 314, which is exactly what the Republicans in the state legislature wanted all along.

Alabama’s new law, which was always expected to be blocked by a federal court before it would take effect in November, would ban abortions except when the life of the mother is in danger. HB 314 would criminalize doctors, not women, by making it a Class A felony to perform an abortion and a Class C felony to attempt an abortion.

Proponents of the legislation have been clear in their intentions since the bill was still being written. This includes State Rep. Terri Collins (R-Decatur), the bill’s sponsor.

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“We not only expected a challenge to Alabama’s pro-life law from ultra-liberal groups like Planned Parenthood and the ACLU, we actually invited it,” Collins explained in a statement on Friday. “Our intent from the day this bill was drafted was to use it as a vehicle to challenge the constitutional abomination known as Roe v. Wade.”

The bill is entitled the “Human Life Protection Act,” and is now the nation’s strongest law shielding unborn babies from being aborted. Proponents of the legislation have explained it is intended to be a “vehicle” to get the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider Roe v. Wade on the basis of personhood, actually using the exact language from that infamous court decision in the bill.

Collins and State Sen. Clyde Chambliss (R-Prattville), who carried the bill in the Senate, have outlined that the question at hand is whether the baby in the womb, or “in utero” legally speaking, is a person and should have rights as such.

Collins on Friday welcomed the legal battle, concluding, “This lawsuit is simply the first battle in what we hope will ultimately be a victorious effort to overturn Roe and protect unborn babies from harm. Alabama’s state motto is ‘We Dare Defend Our Rights,’ and I am deeply proud that this Legislature, this governor, and this state are leading the charge to defend the rights of the unborn.”

The lawsuit by Planned Parenthood and the ACLU was filed on behalf of “Alabama abortion providers,” according to the special interest groups’ joint press release.

In a statement, a senior staff attorney at the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project said politicians across the country have been “emboldened by President Trump’s anti-abortion agenda.”

One of the plaintiff’s in the new lawsuit, Dr. Yashica Robinson (the owner of Alabama Women’s Center), claimed, “Our patients at Alabama Women’s Center already have to overcome so much just to get to our doors, and this law further shames them, punishes providers like myself, and stigmatizes essential health care.”

In a statement of her own, Staci Fox, president and CEO at Planned Parenthood Southeast, asserted, “We are defending the work of the brave folks who came before us. And we are fighting to take this country forward, not backwards.”

Dr. Leana Wen, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, alleged, “[T]he public is on our side.”

In November, Yellowhammer State voters passed Amendment Two 60%-40%, officially declaring Alabama as a pro-life state.

In addition to Dr. Robinson, plaintiffs represented in the case are Alabama Women’s Center, Reproductive Health Services, West Alabama Women’s Center and Planned Parenthood Southeast.

The complaint was filed in the United States District Court of the Middle District of Alabama.

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall previously said his office would be prepared to defend the new law against expected legal challenges.

The lawsuit comes immediately following the revelation that Planned Parenthood was involved in at least one government’s boycott of the state of Alabama stemming from the abortion ban, even though the organization has insisted and continues to maintain the ban will never take effect.

The ACLU of Alabama this week was on the losing side of another legislative battle, when the organization opposed a bill passed by the House to protect First Amendment free speech on public college and university campuses in the Yellowhammer State.

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

2 hours ago

Alabama red snapper fishing season set to begin

Alabama state officials are reminding recreational anglers that state and federal waters open for red snapper fishing on June 1.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Marine Resources Division says fishing will be open Friday through Sunday from June 1 to July 28, and Thursday, July 4.

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The department says those dates only apply to those fishing from recreational boats and licensed party boats that do not have federal for-hire fishing permits.

The season for federally permitted for-hire boats have a season that runs from June 1 to Aug. 2.

Alabama’s private vessel quota for this year is about a million pounds.

The department says it will monitor landings and may adjust the private vessel season length to give anglers the most access possible while staying within the quota.
(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

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2 hours ago

House approves wine shipment legislation

The Alabama House of Representatives has passed legislation allowing residents to purchase wine and have it shipped directly to their house.

The bill by Republican Rep. Terri Collins (R-Decatur) would allow licensed wine manufacturers to obtain a permit to deliver limited quantities of wine directly to Alabamians.

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The Alcoholic Beverage Control Board does not currently allow such shipments.

The bill passed 77-11. It now heads to the Senate.

Rep. Thomas Jackson (D-Thomasville) jokingly shouted during Thursday’s debate, “What’s wrong with the wine we got now?”

The line was a reference to former Rep. Alvin Holmes who famously asked in a 2008 debate: “What’s wrong with the beer we got? I mean the beer we got drank pretty good, don’t it?”
(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

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