8 months ago

VIDEO: Almost everyone wants impeachment, Sen. Doug Jones feels the pressure, Alabama Democrats’ chaos continues and more on Guerrilla Politics

Dale Jackson and Dr. Waymon Burke take you through this week’s biggest political stories, including:

— Can President Donald Trump and other Republicans force House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-CA) hand on impeachment?

— What happens if U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) votes for President Trump’s impeachment?

— Will Alabama Democrats ever end their infighting and unite as a party?

Jackson and Burke are joined by Lt. General Jim Link (U.S. Army – Retired) to discuss foreign policy matters in Syria and Hong Kong.

Jackson closes the show with a “parting shot” where he talks about how the NBA’s hypocrisy on Hong Kong will undermine all their social justice preening they do on American political issues.

Dale Jackson is a contributing writer to Yellowhammer News and hosts a talk show from 7-11 am weekdays on WVNN.

6 hours ago

Statue of Robert E. Lee toppled at Montgomery high school

A statue of Robert E. Lee was knocked down from its pedestal at Montgomery’s Lee High School sometime Monday evening, as evidenced by pictures from the scene.

When WSFA arrived on the scene, the TV outlet reported that no one was present besides police officers, who proceeded to stand the statue back up next to the pedestal, which looms large in front of the school’s main entrance.

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Per WSFA, it was not immediately clear what happened to the statue.

The outlet reported that the statue was subsequently loaded onto a truck to be removed from the scene.

The incident was discovered as a peaceful protest occurred in downtown Montgomery, just outside the historic Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was once the pastor.

This also came as the City of Birmingham continued to work to remove the 115-year-old Confederate Soldiers and Sailors monument in Linn Park.

Monday was an annual state holiday in Alabama, recognizing the birthday of Jefferson Davis, who served as president of the Confederacy from 1861-1865.

UPDATE 11:00 p.m.

WSFA reported that the Montgomery Police Department has “suspects” in custody.

This is breaking news and may be updated.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

11 hours ago

End the mayhem and madness: The rule of law, not mobs, must prevail

Have we gone mad? In liberal cities and states, American citizens are more likely to be arrested for attending church than for fire-bombing one – as a crowd of rioters tried to do in Washington, D.C.

Enough. Americans cannot and will not abide this violence and destruction any longer. If any government official does wrong, every American has the constitutional right to protest and demand justice, but no American is entitled to commit violence or destruction or join a lawless mob. The rule of law, not the rule of mobs, must prevail.

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First, we must fully understand that peaceful protestors demonstrate, they do not destroy. These are, in fact, riots – led by radicals, anarchists and criminals bent on mayhem and chaos. But far too many public officials don’t seem to understand this fact. Instead, they beg and plead with the public to be calm, peaceful, and responsible. But the many good people who heed those calls were never burning, looting, or vandalizing stores, monuments, and homes or attacking their fellow citizens or police. The radicals hear those pleas as signals of weakness and fear in face of their street-level terror. It only emboldens these predators to commit more violence, sow more fear, and wreak further havoc. These outlaws believe they have the law on the run.

It is critical that the thin blue line that defends order from chaos have the support of their own elected leaders. Without that, innocent and upstanding law officers are left to doubt if doing their duty is appreciated. Law officers should be held accountable for wrongdoing, but that does not allow for the slandering, denigration, and disrespect of hundreds of thousands of self-sacrificing, courageous and honorable men and women of law enforcement. These fine officers spend a career serving others in countless ways, often at risk of their own lives, showing patience and understanding in the face of provocation. Nothing could be more harmful to achieving a safe society than having great officers depart the profession and others never apply. The crimes of the few should not outweigh the virtues of the many. That’s why we need more good cops, not fewer.

We should immediately deploy all necessary resources and force to restore order and uphold justice for all. As Attorney General, I helped rebuild state, local, and federal law enforcement partnerships. Those should be activated to identify, pursue, and apprehend dangerous rioters before they strike again. The National Guard and other federal forces should be called on when needed. Together, we should “flood the zone” and target, remove and vigorously prosecute these rioters and criminals as soon as unrest begins. This strategy, conducted with overwhelming and combined numbers and force, would quell these riots before they engulf whole communities and spread further. We cannot allow our police forces to be outnumbered or overrun when facing these kinds of violent hordes.

President Trump is right: these rioters are acting as terrorists and should be treated as such.

The burning of the Minneapolis police station and the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, the murder of an African American federal security officer in California, the injuries to more than 60 Secret Service agents defending the White House, and the countless other assaults on law officers, National Guardsmen, first responders, business owners, and innocent bystanders are not just attacks on people and property, they are direct attacks our system of justice and our commitment to be a nation of laws.

The last few nights have made clear that rioters and looters have twisted the memory of George Floyd and have distorted the message of justice from the peaceful protestors and have turned it into an excuse for anarchy, crime, and destruction. George Floyd deserved better.

Fortunately, security cameras and the widespread use of smartphones provide us with substantial evidence that can be used to bring the rioters to justice. State, local, and federal enforcement agencies across the country should commit to using all of their investigative resources to identify and prosecute the criminals depicted in those videos and images of assaults, destruction and looting over the past few nights. Every one of them must be brought to justice. And elected officials must commit to supporting that good work, not continuing to encourage the riots through leniency.

Violent, destructive mobs cannot be allowed to rule our streets one minute longer. It must end now!

Jeff Sessions has served as a U.S. Senator and Attorney General and is a 2020 candidate for U.S. Senate in Alabama

12 hours ago

Steeling the nation for recovery

The COVID-19 pandemic has sent shockwaves through the global economy. But recovery is on the horizon and one critical industry in Alabama – the metallurgical coal industry – is poised to help lead the way.

When most Americans think of coal, they think electricity, but metallurgical coal – called “met” for short – is used to produce steel. In fact, it’s used to produce 70% of the world’s steel, and the global appetite for steel could be poised for considerable growth.

From China to Europe and here at home, economic recovery is likely to include infrastructure build out. China has already announced as much and China’s steel mills – used to produce nearly half of the world’s steel – are roaring back to life.

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Soaring steel production in China is underpinning rising global demand for met coal, a significant amount of which comes from U.S. mines.

U.S. met producers – deemed an essential industry during the pandemic – are ready for China’s big build and for the likely surge in global infrastructure spending as nations look to put people back to work and get the wheels of the global economy moving in the right direction again.

Whether the demand is coming from new roads, bridges or dams, or renewable energy systems or electric cars, the world needs steel and it needs metallurgical coal production. Nearly 1 billion tons of metallurgical coal is used each year to feed the world’s voracious appetite for steel, an appetite only expected to grow.

Urbanization – a trend only accelerating – is driving immense demand for steel all over the world. As Bill Gates observed, when thinking about a global population racing towards 10 billion, “the world’s building stock will double in area by 2060. That’s like adding another New York City every month for 40 years.”

That urbanization – that building and investment in infrastructure – means steel demand is likely to be 1.5 times higher than it is today by midcentury.

Every ton of steel produced requires nearly as much metallurgical coal. Considering that the U.S. highway system alone has required about 6 billion tons of steel, met coal is inarguably essential to the world’s infrastructure future.

It should be no surprise then that metallurgical production remains a growth area in the United States. Warrior Met Coal, based in Alabama, recently announced the construction of a new barge facility to move its growing production to market. In February, the company announced a new $578 million investment in an underground mine that will create 371 jobs.

The U.S. metallurgical industry, like so many other industries, is working to weather the economic shock of the pandemic but it remains a foundational piece of our economy with rock-solid prospects. The nation’s more than 175 met mines directly employ more than 13,000 Americans, providing a key ingredient to build the infrastructure, cities and innovative technologies of today and tomorrow.

As the U.S. and the world get to work on economic recovery, consider the industries, materials and fuels making it happen. The U.S. metallurgical coal industry will quite literally help provide the foundation upon which we rebuild both our infrastructure and our economy.

Rich Nolan is president and CEO of the National Mining Association

13 hours ago

Ivey participates in national phone call with Trump on handling protests, civil unrest

Governor Kay Ivey’s office on Monday confirmed to Yellowhammer News that she participated in a national phone call led by President Donald Trump regarding the protests and riots that have unfolded across the country following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last week.

Trump, U.S. Attorney General William Barr, governors, law enforcement leaders and national security officials were reportedly on the Monday morning call.

According to Fox News, Trump was critical of many governors’ “weak” responses to violence, looting, arson and vandalism that has plagued several cities nationwide.

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“Most of you are weak,” Trump said, according to Fox News’ reporting. “You have to arrest people.”

“You have to dominate, if you don’t dominate you’re wasting your time,” he added. “They’re going to run over you, you’re going to look like a bunch of jerks. You have to dominate.”

Among other strong remarks, the president reportedly urged governors to call up their respective National Guard. Trump told the governors they were making themselves “look like fools” for not doing so as a show of force on city streets.

This came the day after Birmingham, Alabama, joined the ranks of cities who have experienced protests devolving into criminality.

Asked for comment on the phone call with the president, a spokesperson for Governor Ivey’s office referred Yellowhammer News to her remarks and actions announced earlier in the day. The spokesperson added that the governor “and the president are certainly on the same page.”

RELATED: Ivey: ‘Will not allow our cities to become a target for those … who choose to use violence and destruction to make their point’

Ivey on Monday morning announced that she has given authorization to Adjutant General Sheryl Gordon with the Alabama National Guard to activate up to 1,000 guardsmen, should the need arise in response to violent civil unrest.

“The Alabama National Guard stands ready to assist when peaceful protests become violent and dangerous to our public safety,” Ivey stated. “I will always support the right of the people of Alabama to peacefully lift your voices in anger and frustration. However, we will not allow our cities to become a target for those, especially from other states, who choose to use violence and destruction to make their point.”

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

13 hours ago

Auburn Athletics leaders, Alabama elected officials remember Pat Dye

Legendary former Auburn University head football coach and athletic director Pat Dye passed away on Monday morning, and tributes are already pouring in from across the Yellowhammer State.

Dye is survived by his four children (Pat Jr., Missy, Brett and Wanda), nine grandchildren and his partner of 18 years, Nancy McDonald.

In a statement, Pat Dye, Jr., thanked everyone for their support.

“On behalf of our family, I want to thank all of the people from around the country who have offered their support and admiration for Dad these past several days,” he said. “Dad would be honored and humbled to know about this overwhelming outreach. The world has lost a pretty good football coach and a great man. He was beloved, he touched so many lives and he will be missed by many, especially our family.”

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The Crooked Oaks Legacy Foundation has been established to honor Coach Dye and his legacy, as well as to continue his work and love of people, nature and the gardens he created at Crooked Oaks for everyone to enjoy. The foundation will also support the needs of qualifying students at Auburn University and Auburn University at Montgomery to further their education.

A memorial to honor Dye will be held at a later date, according to the university. Details will be announced once they have been confirmed.

Governor Kay Ivey:

“I am saddened to hear of the passing of Coach Pat Dye — a great man, coach and member of the Auburn family. Not only was he a phenomenal football coach, but an even better person. For years, I have known Pat personally and have always valued his friendship and colorful commentary. He had great takes on both football and life. Coach Dye truly embodied the Auburn spirit. He will be missed not only by the Auburn family, but the entire state of Alabama. War Eagle, Coach. Your life and legacy lives on.”

U.S. Rep. Robert Aderholt (AL-04):

“If there was a college football version of Mount Rushmore, Pat Dye could be there among the greats. Not only did he bring Auburn football back into prominence by winning games, SEC Championships, and what probably should have been a 1983 National Championship, he was a wonderful molder of young men. While he will long be remembered for the games he won and the contributions he made to the great Auburn-Alabama rivalry, there are hundreds of people who were touched by him who will carry on his legacy for decades to come.”

Auburn Director of Athletics Allen Greene:

“For four decades, Coach Dye showed all of us what it looks like to be an Auburn person. His coaching exploits are well known, securing his induction into the College Football Hall of Fame. His skills as an administrator were equally formidable, resulting most notably in bringing the Iron Bowl to Jordan-Hare Stadium.

Just like his football teams, Pat Dye the athletic director was tenacious, never backing down from a fight when he believed Auburn’s good name and best interests demanded it. Thanks to his tenacity, I’ll always treasure my first home Iron Bowl, celebrating victory on the field that bears his name.

It’s been a blessing to get to know Coach Dye in his retirement years in his role as a passionate supporter of all of Auburn Athletics. Ever the coach, I’ve witnessed him on countless occasions pouring into our student-athletes. In that sense, he never stopped being Coach Dye. On behalf of the Auburn Family, we extend our deepest condolences to the family of Patrick Fain Dye, whose love and loyalty for Auburn rendered a contribution we can never fully measure or repay.”

Gus Malzahn, Auburn head football coach:

“Coach Dye was much more than a hall of fame coach and administrator at Auburn. He was an Auburn leader and visionary. He not only returned the football program back to national prominence during his tenure, but was a key figure in bringing the Iron Bowl to Auburn and made an impact on the university and in the community. He embodied what Auburn is about: hard work, toughness and a blue collar mentality.

Coach Dye’s impact on Auburn is endless and will stand the test of time. He had a great and deep love for Auburn and he displayed that affinity daily. I’m very appreciative of his support and friendship through the years. It’s a sad day. Coach Dye was a treasure and will be missed. My thoughts and prayers are with his family, his former players and coaches and the entire Auburn family.”

David Housel, Auburn athletic director/sports information director emeritus:

“People will talk about all of the games coach dye won, all of those champions and bowl games, but his greatest contribution, his legacy, is the difference he made in the lives of his players and the people who worked for him. I am one of them. He made a difference in my life.

He came to Auburn at a time when Auburn needed leadership and focus. He provided that leadership and focus and Auburn will be forever better because of him.”

Hal Baird, Auburn baseball coach, 1985-2000:

“Coach Dye was a mentor and a friend for 46 years. I was with him when he coached his first football game at East Carolina and his last game at Auburn. He was a giant of a man and touched hundreds if not thousands of people. Everyone that he touched would say the same thing, that his life was built on a core of values that he taught to his players, coaches and staff. It’s a huge loss. He left an indelible impression on college football, on Auburn and really the entire country.”

Jay Jacobs, Former Auburn athletic director/administrator, Auburn football letterman:

“Coach Dye changed the course of Auburn Athletics and Auburn University when he walked on campus. He personified the Auburn Creed.

He impacted countless lives and continues to impact lives today because of who he was and what he wanted for Auburn. The entire Auburn family continues to benefit from him.

This has nothing to do with winning and losing games. It has to do with building character and persistence in young men. That’s what he did. He took regular boys, and if you went through his program, you became better for it. That’s his legacy. We had a chance to win games and championships, but his legacy is how he’s revered by players because of the way he profoundly impacted our lives positively forever.

Because of his relentless pursuit of excellence, he made us all better. He molded everyone into champions. He gave us the courage to have a spirit that is not afraid. He gave us poise and confidence to be who we are today – dads, husbands, brothers, community leaders, whatever it may be. He forged in us an attitude of excellence and toughness. He taught us that when you fall, to get up and go harder.”

Quentin Riggins, Former Auburn All-SEC and team captain linebacker; University trustee:

“Coach Dye was special to me. I was not the stereotypical 6-4, 220-pound linebacker. I didn’t fit the specifications to be chosen to play that position. But somehow he saw something in me that could help Auburn and his football team. I’ll never forget him taking the chance on me in 1986 when he could have recruited anyone in the state at that position.

A large part of it was because my senior year in high school, I left a football game at halftime. It was the SW Louisiana game during Bo Jackson’s senior year. My dad told Coach Dye we couldn’t stay for the entire game because I had to work at 5 p.m. back home at McDonald’s. Little did I know that’s what struck his interest in me, that on a Saturday you can come to a football game, meet Bo Jackson and have an excuse to miss work, but leave at halftime to go to work. He’s told that story numerous times. Coach Dye wanted players like Bo, Frank Thomas, Reggie Slack and Lawyer Tillman, but he also saw past 4.3, 6-4, 250 and saw one of the ingredients that made a winning player and team. That’s what he went for.

I got a chance to talk to Coach about two weeks ago, to hear his voice and tell him I loved him. Hearing him talk was special to me. His toughness, his opening press conference when he said how long it was going to take to beat Alabama, Tiger Walk, and winning the fourth quarter…those are just a few of the marks he left on Auburn. Nobody can take that away from him. He left such an incredible, indelible mark. Players and fans of today are benefitting from his contributions to Auburn.”

Former University of Alabama head football coach Gene Stallings:

“I was so sorry to hear about Pat (Dye) I knew him before we were head coaches and I’ve been his friend ever since. When he was at Auburn and I was at Alabama, on the field or recruiting, we never had one cross word between us.”

University of Alabama head football coach Nick Saban

“I’ve known and respected Pat Dye for many years, and he always represented college football with tremendous class and integrity. He was an outstanding teacher and coach who affected our game in many significant ways. We are saddened to hear of his passing and our thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends, co-workers and all of the players he had such a positive impact on throughout his distinguished career.”

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn