Unreal — Medical how-to book for counseling ‘religious’ women that abortion is okay


Listen to the 10 min audio

Read the transcript:

MEDICAL SCHOOL NOW TEACHING HOW TO COUNSEL CHRISTIAN WOMEN THAT ABORTION IS OKAY

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, I want to take you to an article out of The College Fix. The University of California-San Francisco has come out with a training book for medical students which teaches them counseling techniques on how to talk to religious women about abortion, especially if they believe that life begins at conception and that abortion is an act of murder.

DR. REEDER: We are being told that all we do in the medical school is teach our students how to do good medicine and, by the way, good medicine includes abortion. Well, the jagged edges of that statement are overwhelming.

What do they do when you’ve got people who look at that and say, “You know, it’s not good medicine to kill a baby in the womb. We’re calling that murder”? Do they listen and enter into the debate in terms of is abortion good medicine or not?

They are fully embracing a world and life view that promotes the death spiral of removing any living being in the womb that is unwanted or inconvenient and they do so under the guise that there are therapeutic abortions because of health reasons. As that exists, at most, is less than 1 percent of the abortions so how do you promote the other 99 percent, which is, “This child is inconvenient and unwanted so I’m going to kill it”?

THIS IS A NEW TACTIC, BUT SAME RESULT

Well, instead of debating whether you should do that or not and entering into that debate, they are now not simply going to teach medical students their trade of medicine — even the horrific trade of how to do abortions — but they’re now going to teach them how to counsel the sensitivities of those who see the abortion as the wrongful taking of an innocent life.

Now they’ve moved to the tactics of the philosophy of medicine rooted in a secular world and life view which says that anything that’s in the way of my personal definition is happiness, you can remove that, as defenseless as it might be. Now the techniques of how to either assuage women who have these convictions or change their convictions is being taught to the medical students as they become evangelists of the abortion industry.

TRAINED TO POINT TO “CHRISTIAN SITES” 

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, it is interesting to note that this handbook recommends certain internet sites to refer women to. One of those sites is called “Faith Allowed.” It is rather stark, as they use Christian language to convince women to have abortions and that it’s alright.

They say they want every woman to feel confident and at peace with her decision to have an abortion. “We want every woman to feel supported. We believe that women are good, created in the image of God and able to make difficult decisions. We believe this power to make personal decisions is given to us by God.”

DR. REEDER: What is left out of that is that God gives us the information through divine revelation. “Not only have I made you in my image with the ability to make moral decisions, but here are the parameters of a moral decision.”

And one of the parameters is this: you shall not murder. And now the question is: is abortion murder or not? Well, let’s enter into the debate. Don’t try to give pablum language that assuages people — let’s enter into the debate.

THIS IS THE BEGINNING OF A NEW “MEDICAL” SECULAR EVANGELISM

Tom, it is very notable that, in this movement of teaching these students, it was acknowledged that we need to teach you to do that because there are some women who are “religious” who need to have their minds changed and need to be set at peace with the destruction of their child.

What is clearly being said is this: “We won the day in the public arena, but there’s this segment of our society that is ‘religious.’ Being religious, they have ethical dimensions — they believe that there’s some things right and some things wrong — and they actually believe that life begins at conception, which is scientifically verifiable, and they actually believe that life is sacred, which is a statement of divine revelation, and they actually believe that you shouldn’t take that life just because the life is inconvenient. Okay, what we’re going to do is not enter into the debate of their convictions, but we’re going to find a way to falsely assuage their convictions so that they will be talked into doing this.”

FALSE EVANGELISM YIELDS EMPTY PROMISES AND BROKEN WOMEN

Well, let me tell you what you’ve done. You may be successful with persuasive tactics to tell them, “It’s okay for you to kill this baby,” but I will promise you, deep down, because of what this website says — these images are made in the image of God — religious women obviously are aware of that, but the non-religious women, they are also aware of that.

Now, they may not be as sophisticated in their awareness of it as those who have been discipled, so every time you talk the person with convictions into doing it and even those that you’re doing it to, there is going to come a later date where they are going to have conviction, and shame, and guilt and fear and they’re going to have regret and remorse and you are the one that talked them into it.

CHRISTIANITY WILL BE THERE TO HEAL BUT THOSE “COUNSELORS” WILL NOT

Now let me tell you what we’re going to do when that happens. We’re going to reach into those women’s lives and we’re going to love them dearly — not that the decision was a right decision but tell them that there is a God Who loves you and that God will bring the forgiving power of Jesus Christ into your life, Who has paid for all of our sins and even those sins you can be aware of.

If you don’t believe that He can forgive you, we want to point you to three of the most prolific writers of the Bible: Moses, David and the apostle Paul. Paul was a religious terrorist who participated in the destruction of the lives of Christians, David was a conspirator to murder and Moses was guilty of manslaughter.

Our God’s grace and mercy cannot be stopped if  you come to Him and we will be at work in your life to show you, first of all, God’s redeeming grace in the life of your child and that there is every evidence in the Word of God that such children have been numbered with the elect and under the atoning work of Christ and, secondly, that God can give you not only forgiveness but renewal and, the area that you feel the most conviction of right now, He can turn into a great virtue in your life as you become one who affirms the sanctity of life and the power of God’s redeeming grace in every life.

That’s what we will do. What will the abortionists do? They don’t do anything for them. Later on, when the consequences of the act of abortion that you talked them into are there, I can assure you they will not be there to pick up the pieces in your life — but let me assure you that we are. We are there because Jesus is there.

However, what we want to do is to get into your life before you make that decision and tell you there are other decisions. You’re being told the decision is alright and, by the way, it’s really the only valid decision.

No, there are better decisions in the situation of an unwanted pregnancy or an unplanned pregnancy. There are families that are ready to adopt and there are people that are ready to help you.

There’s a couple of things that are evident, Tom. If you think that secular humanism is not a religious act, just look at its evangelism. They’re teaching tactics to evangelize you into the destruction of life. Secondly, if you think that, as a Christian, your convictions are not going to be challenged by the secular humanists of our age, now you’re warned.

KNOW REAL EVANGELISM SO THAT YOU CAN SPOT THE FAKE

Recently, Billy Graham went to be with the Lord and previous to that was Ruth Graham — what a godly lady. In one of the crusades in England, they had the opportunity to sit down at a banquet table with the political powerful. And Ruth is just a very upfront person and she’s talking to this guy that we would know as a “Minister of Finance”.

And they got to talking about the problem of counterfeiting because of the technology that was making it easier and she said, “Well, how in he world do you train your agents to spot something that’s counterfeit? There just seems to be so many variations — how can you possibly do that?” And he looked at her and he said, “Well, Madam, I don’t try to teach them all of the possible counterfeits; I just try to teach them what the real thing is and, when you know the real thing, then you can spot the counterfeit.”

That’s what we need to do in evangelism and discipleship: teach the real thing. Coming to Christ is our life so that the spirit of God empowers us, the Word of God frames us and the glory of God propels us because of the love of God that has laid hold of us in Christ our Lord.

Dr. Harry L. Reeder III is the Senior Pastor of Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham.

This podcast was transcribed by Jessica Havin, editorial assistant for Yellowhammer News, who has transcribed some of the top podcasts in the country and whose work has been featured in a New York Times Bestseller.

3 mins ago

Alabama banks preparing to assist small businesses with recovery — ‘Call your banker’

It was only two months ago that the small business sector recorded its highest level of confidence in the last 50 years. Now, most of those same businesses across Alabama await the opportunity to rebuild once the COVID-19 crisis stabilizes.

At the center of that recovery will be Alabama’s banking industry.

A key provision of the historic economic stimulus package passed by Congress, and signed into law by President Donald Trump, is the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Paycheck Protection Program.

Under this program, small businesses with fewer than 500 employees will be allowed to apply for a low-interest Paycheck Protection loan of up to 2.5 times their average monthly payroll costs to cover expenses related to payroll, health insurance, retirement contributions, covered leave, rent, utilities, and interest on debt payments.

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Alabama’s banks will play a pivotal role in getting this much-needed capital into the hands of small businesses all across the state.

In a statement to Yellowhammer News, David Nast, president and CEO of Progress Bank and Trust, stated that his industry is ready to handle the needs of its customers as they take advantage of the federal stimulus package.

“Banks in our state are already very familiar with helping customers access SBA funding,” said Nast, who currently serves as chairman of the Alabama Bankers Association. “Nearly 94% of banks headquartered in Alabama are SBA-approved lenders, and that number could easily grow higher over the next few weeks.”

Reassuring its customers throughout the crisis has been a priority for the Alabama Bankers Association (ABA).

Through its “Safe and Sound” campaign, the ABA has been spreading the message that even in these uncertain times, a bank account is the safest place for funds to be stored.

But the association has also made clear that banks and customers will need to work together to recover from the economic impact of the coronavirus.

“No Alabama bank has closed its doors during this crisis,” Nast said. “Even banks that have changed their lobby hours are still meeting customer needs through drive-thru or online options or by appointment. Regardless of how banks are interacting with their customers, our advice for individuals and small businesses has been to put ‘Call Your Banker’ near the top of the to-do list. While every bank and every customer is unique, bankers can provide access to multiple helpful options, whether it’s applying for an SBA loan or modifying an existing agreement.”

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin outlined today that loans may be available for small businesses as soon as Friday with filing instructions potentially coming by Monday afternoon.

Wiregrass banker Hope Johnson emphasized that bankers will continue to be one of the best resources for information for customers.

“Congress is clearly positioning SBA to be a key player in the country’s economic recovery,” said Johnson, president and CEO of Slocomb-based Friend Bank and the current treasurer of the Alabama Bankers Association’s Board of Directors. “As an SBA Express lender myself, my advice would be for anyone considering an SBA loan, including the Paycheck Protection loan, to contact your local banker. Importantly, the Paycheck Protection loan may be forgiven if borrowers meet certain payroll requirements.”

When it comes to SBA loans in particular, there are some things small business owners can do to prepare for the next steps.

While regulations related to the Paycheck Protection Program have not been finalized, business-owners should be ready to produce information regarding payroll, debt and overhead expenses when they meet with their banker and apply for one of these loans. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has prepared a helpful checklist that will answer questions about eligibility, proper documentation, borrowing limits and loan forgiveness.

“Even though this new SBA program is gaining a lot of publicity, it’s likely not the only solution available for customers who have been damaged by the COVID-19 pandemic,” says Johnson. “Alabama banks stand ready to work with our customers during this challenging season, and look forward to helping our small businesses restart Alabama’s economic engine.”

Watch a short video from ABA aiming to help inform its customers during the COVID-19 crisis:

Tim Howe is an owner of Yellowhammer Multimedia

22 mins ago

Alabama-based Jack’s Family Restaurants chain raising money for coronavirus relief

Local Jack’s Family Restaurants across the South are now asking guests to join their efforts in raising funds to support organizations and families in crisis as a result of the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Through the brand’s 501(c)(3) foundation, the Jack’s Family Fund, guests are invited to make a donation with every order.

Jack’s has partnered with several local media affiliates, Coca-Cola, Dr. Pepper, Mayfield Dairy Farms, the University of Alabama, Lamar Advertising Company and THINC Advertising to assist in their efforts through grants, in-kind support and other financial donations.

The endeavor began last week and continues a storied history of community involvement and charitable giving for Jack’s, which was founded in 1960 in Homewood, Alabama, as Jack’s Hamburgers. The company has grown from a walk-up hamburger stand that served burgers, fries, sodas and shakes to a powerhouse with 180 locations in four states.

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“At Jack’s we have always focused on supporting our communities in meaningful ways, especially in times of need, and we want to make sure no one goes without during this unprecedented time,” Jack’s CEO Todd Bartmess said in a statement.

“In the South, we take care of each other and appreciate that our partners and vendors share this vision and are committed to helping those who are hardest hit by COVID-19,” Bartmess added.

Throughout its 60-year history, Jack’s Family Restaurants has also supported its local communities by donating food to local schools, hosting fundraisers, partnering with area organizations to serve those in need and much more.

Jack’s has released a video ad spreading awareness for the company’s coronavirus relief efforts.

Watch:

Donations can be made to the cause online here.

You can also follow along with the company’s efforts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

RELATED: Keep up with Alabama’s confirmed coronavirus cases, locations here

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

2 hours ago

Why Governor Ivey is the champion Alabama’s prisons desperately need right now

Alabama’s prisons are a dangerous place to be. Alabama’s prison population sits at over 160% of its designed capacity, with a homicide rate nearly nine times the national average. In 2019, there were 14 homicides in state prisons. This does not include the number of suicides or drug overdoses, which are also high in the state’s prisons.

But thanks to Governor Kay Ivey, Alabama’s correctional system is undergoing a vital transformation. This is especially important as prisons across the U.S. continue to pose a high coronavirus risk. There have been no diagnosed cases of coronavirus in Alabama’s prisons yet, but the governor’s COVID-19 task force has been at work with the Alabama Department of Corrections on a proactive plan to stop the spread of the virus in prisons.

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Furthermore, in January of this year, Governor Ivey convened a Study Group on Criminal Justice Policy, which is an example that other states struggling with prison violence and high crime rates should draw from. The Group is bringing an informed, thoughtful and research-based approach to modernizing Alabama’s justice system to create safer and more thriving communities than the way our country has approached incarceration in the past.

I commend the governor for the steps she is taking for Alabama’s future – both before and during the coronavirus pandemic. In February, Governor Ivey endorsed several justice reform initiatives that will increase safety in the state’s prisons and support rehabilitation efforts. The measures include a revision to the oath of office taken by correctional officers that emphasizes rehabilitation; increased funding for prison education and mental health services; a requirement for prisoners to undergo mandatory supervision before their release to reduce recidivism; and eligibility for revised sentences for nonviolent crimes.

Measures like these do not make our communities less safe; in fact, they do the opposite. With justice reform measures being taken in both the federal and state systems at unprecedented levels, violent crime has decreased 5% over the past three years. According to criminology experts, incarceration actually has a marginal impact on crime, especially violent crime; in some cases, research has shown that incarceration can actually increase crime. This has been referred to as “the prison paradox.”

What does decrease crime? Education. Substance abuse services. Mental health services. Employment assistance. All of these have been proven to lower recidivism and crime. Since 2007, more than 30 states have passed reforms that address these issues and prioritize prison beds for serious offenders. Indeed, if smart and measured approaches recommended by the Study Group on Criminal Justice Policy are adopted by the legislature, Alabama can see its crime rates drop, its overall prison population drop, and its state prison budget drop.

Justice reform is one of the rare issues that is receiving bipartisan support – not just in Alabama but across the country. America’s high incarceration rate – the highest in the world – takes a massive human toll on families, individuals and communities. But increasingly, leaders like President Trump on the federal level and Governor Ivey on the state level are proving that you can be both “tough on crime” and “smart on crime” at the same time.

Moreover, the goals of justice reform measures are consistent with faith-based values. These values balance personal responsibility with forgiveness, compassion and mercy. This is an issue that can’t wait for attention. It’s also an issue that will allow us to pull together at a time when we face an unprecedented “invisible enemy” in the coronavirus, when we are divided by political partisanship and are facing an uncertain economic future. In this time of anxiety for vulnerable family, friends and loved ones, Governor Ivey is taking the necessary steps to bring change to Alabama’s justice system. I support Attorney General Barr’s recent order to the federal Bureau of Prisons to grant home confinement to many sick and elderly inmates during the coronavirus, and hope similar steps are taken in state and local prisons across the country. And I urge Alabamans not to forget about the incarcerated as they consider the future of their communities and their country.

Timothy Head is the executive director for the Faith & Freedom Coalition, a national grassroots movement of over 2 million conservatives and people of faith in support of time-honored values, stronger families, and individual freedom.

Byrne: Hope in the time of the coronavirus

In Genesis 2, God says, “It is not good that the man should be alone.” He made us for Himself, but he also made us for one another. We are intimately connected to one another, and separation, even though for our own physical health, and even though on a temporary basis, is painful for us all.

John Donne, the dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London during the 17th century, said, “No man is an island, entire unto itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” He went on to say, “any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind.”

We are not “islands,” we are part of the “main” of all humans and “involved” in the life of the world here and now. Disease and death diminish us all. But, they don’t have to defeat us. We can and will defeat this disease.

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This fight against the coronavirus called COVID-19 is hard. We are forced to separate from one another, a necessary infringement on our humanity, and however necessary, an infringement on basic liberties. Our economy is sorely wounded. Worse, our neighbors are infected with this disease, some fighting for their lives, some tragically losing that fight.

We are better, stronger than this disease. Brave men and women on the frontline, doctors and nurses, first responders and health paraprofessionals, pharmacists and those working to provide us food and necessities, are showing the indomitable American will, the will to win. And, yet, all of us have a role to play, to responsibly social distance from one another, to practice proper hygiene and to know when its time to be tested and/or to quarantine ourselves.

We have weathered diseases before in our history. The 1918 Flu Pandemic. The Polio Epidemic of the 1950s. Yellow Fever ravaged early Mobile and all of Alabama off and on during the 19th century. But, in all of those we didn’t have the public health resources in near the abundance we do now.

The public health professionals tell us that we must slow down the spread of the disease so it doesn’t overwhelm our hospitals and health care providers. That’s why we have social distancing.

We know the disease is spread person to person or when one of us touches a surface where the virus is still alive. By stopping our natural human contact, in our jobs, our schools, our restaurants and bars, our non-essential retailers, our group meetings, our social meetings and even in our worship services, we stop the spread and give our health care professionals the time and resources to help us, to heal us and, for some, to save us.

This obviously hurts us economically and socially. And we don’t need to continue it one minute longer than is needed. We will know when we can start to relax the mandates against social mingling. It will be when the number of new cases starts to come down on a sustained basis; not when we have no new cases, but when the number of new cases, or the rate of new cases, comes down day after day. As we get more tests out there, and new tests are increasing at a fast pace now, we will have a lot more cases. That doesn’t mean it’s spreading at that rate. In part, it just means that we are seeing the natural result of all this new testing.

A couple of data points are important to keep in mind. Only between 10 and 15 percent of all people tested in the US at present are testing positive. The vast majority tested here don’t have the disease. And remember, we are in many places only testing those at risk. As testing gets far wider, that rate may come down. Of those who do test positive, 80 percent have no or only mild symptoms. But, 20 percent need some form of significant care. They are of all ages, by the way, so the fact that you are young doesn’t protect you. And, tragically around 1 percent to 1.5 percent die. That may not sound like much but it’s 10 to 15 times higher than the flu.

Meanwhile, all levels of government play an important role. Our governors and mayors, as well as public health officers, must issue the appropriate orders to protect us all. Closing restaurants and bars, beaches and parks, small retailers and large group meetings, are each hard decisions. The economic and social ramifications are far-reaching. They must start, and they must end, at the right times, based upon sound medical and professional advice, and plain common sense.

We at the federal government must work with state and local leaders to inform their difficult decisions and help them, where appropriate, carry out these tough decisions.

The fathers of two of my House colleagues have served at the highest level of our government. I asked them both if their dads had seen anything like it. Jimmy Panetta, whose dad, Leon Panetta has been White House chief of staff, secretary of Defense and CIA director, said his father had never seen anything like it. Liz Cheney, whose dad, Dick Cheney has been vice president, White House chief of staff and secretary of Defense, said the closest experience in her father’s career was 9/11. Jimmy and Liz, Leon and Dick, Democrats and Republicans. We’ve rarely, if ever, seen anything like this.

When last week’s unemployment insurance filings were reported at over 3 million, the highest ever by far in our history, and when the number of cases and deaths dramatically expanded, it was clear we had entered truly extraordinary times, calling for extraordinary government action.

So, with broad and deep bipartisan support, we passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Security Act (CARES Act), providing over $2 trillion in support for individual citizens, workers who have lost their jobs, small businesses so that they will not close or lay off their workers, larger businesses in the way of loans and not bailouts, healthcare, education, transit, and more. Unprecedented resources have been quickly directed for more tests, more personal protective equipment, research and development for treatments and even a cure, and ultimately a vaccine.

I don’t like everything in the bill. In fact, there were parts that I strongly disagreed with. The time to talk about those, and how they came to be stuffed into an otherwise crucial bill, will come later, and those responsible will be named. But, our people are hurting, our way of life threatened, and this is no time to let these issues slow down the effort to get the job done. Indeed, I had hoped that the vast majority of us in the House could have avoided having to take the risk to actually travel to Washington and be in a room with hundreds of others as we have ordered the rest of the country not to do, but one member threatened to further delay the bill and so I and another 200-plus members made the trip and got the bill passed.

Like most of you, I am working from home and maintaining social distance. My staff is also working and our offices open for you but we ask that you call and not try to come in. We have helped repatriate a number of citizens from our district who have found themselves stuck in a foreign country closing its borders. We are answering many phone calls on the laws we have passed to respond to this disease and with questions about the disease itself.

I must confess, I don’t like to be kept at arm’s length from the people I serve. It runs against everything in me, but I recognize the wisdom of it. We in positions of public authority have the heavy responsibility of gauging how long this must continue and I pray that it is a matter of weeks, not months. But, unfortunately, the virus dictates that; I just want us all, at every level of government, to exercise good common sense. In the meantime, I feel like the words of the old song by one of Alabama’s sons, Hank Williams: “I’m so lonesome I could cry.”

Last week, I was on a number of conference calls with groups in the district and a teletownhall with nearly 4,000 constituents. In one, a person asked me to give them hope. I was struck by that simple request, that we provide hope.

So, here goes.

We are a great and powerful nation. We were born in an uncertain and dangerous revolution, invaded even in our Capitol by the greatest power in the world just 40 years after our founding, suffered a civil war costing 600,000 of our lives, fought two desperate world wars, watched our economy nearly disappear in a Great Depression, tore ourselves apart in the social upheavals of the 60s, and endured an attack by terrorists on our largest city and the center of our national defense. And yet, after each one we Americans not only survived, we learned how to make our country greater, how to perfect our union.

The prophet Isaiah, writing during the Babylonian captivity, put it in beautiful language:

But those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.

And, as we approach Passover and Easter, let us remember the hope expressed in the miraculous delivery of the Jewish people from slavery and the resurrection of Christ who defeated death itself. Indeed, Solomon said in his Eighth Song, “Love is as strong as death.”

That’s the ultimate reason for hope: God’s love for us all overcomes death.

As we mourn those we have lost to this disease, as we continue to miss the physical presence of one another, as we struggle with the testing and spread of the disease, and as we fight to preserve our economy and our way of life, let us be confident in the ultimate result, using our own strength and leaning on God’s.

U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne is a Republican from Fairhope.

3 hours ago

‘We Are Magic’: Video highlights resilience of Birmingham in face of coronavirus, urges support of local businesses

Birmingham-based Telegraph Creative on Sunday released a moving video entitled, “We Are Magic,” showcasing the spirit of optimism, unity and hope that Magic City residents are displaying in the face of the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Coronavirus continues to impact the city in unprecedented — and sometimes devastating — ways, but Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin, who narrated the video, praised locals for being “people who dig deep and don’t quit.”

Woodfin pledged that “we will thrive the only way we know how — by lifting each other up, and helping our neighbors.”

In keeping with the theme of the project, every aspect of the video is local.

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Just over two minutes in length, the video was shot in Birmingham and features local talent, businesses and business owners, as well as music by a local musician. Some recognizable faces include Ezekiel Hameen from Z’s Restaurant; Chris and Idie Hastings from Hot and Hot Fish Club; Andrew Collins from Cayo Coco; Tim Hontzas from Johnny’s; and Kristen Hall and Victor King from The Essential and Bandit.

Telegraph Creative CEO Cliff Sims advised that the company created the video as a way to bring people together at a time when everyone is having to keep their distance in an effort to stop the virus from spreading. To keep all involved parties safe and healthy, social distancing rules were observed during the making of the video.

“These are difficult and uncertain times. We are fighting an invisible enemy that’s tearing through our communities, and it’s taking a toll on all of us,” Sims said in a statement.

“Our team created this video to show the spirit of unity that’s building, even in the midst of hardship — people buying a little extra to support local shops, tipping a little more to help out their favorite restaurants, and smiling a little longer to comfort a stranger across the street. Mayor Woodfin perfectly sums it up when he says, ‘The real magic of the Magic City is us, together. Even when we’re apart.’ The spirit of Birmingham is unbreakable,” he concluded.

Watch:


Full video transcript as follows:

They call her “The Magic City.”

She earned the name because
she rose up from nothing, seemingly overnight,
forging a place of her own.
Birmingham rising
was truly a thing to behold.

On downtown streets born from industry,
where neighborhood shops line the same cobblestone alleys,
Birmingham’s history looms over her present,
like an inventor over her apprentice,
imploring us to keep the magic alive.

Birmingham’s magic is more than a nickname.
It’s the people who dig deep and don’t quit,
with the grit and determination to build something incredible.
It’s the steel-clad bonds that make a community,
and an iron will to survive.

If we have learned anything, it’s that
the spirit of Birmingham is unbreakable.
And we will thrive the only way we know how —
by lifting each other up, and helping our neighbors.

The real magic
of the Magic City
is us, together.
Even when we’re apart.

We are Birmingham.
We are magic.

RELATED: Keep up with Alabama’s confirmed coronavirus cases, locations here

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn