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State Sen. Sam Givhan lays out the current state of the gas tax debate — Proponents should be worried

State Rep. Bill Poole (R-Tuscaloosa) is sponsoring a gas tax in the State House, but still doesn’t have a number for the increase he will propose, leading many people to question how much support the bill actually has.

During a Tuesday conversation on Huntsville’s WVNN about the impending gas tax debate, State Sen. Sam Givhan (R-Huntsville) called in to provide a little clarity about the status of the debate that is happening behind the scenes.

According to Givhan, the proposal will be for a 12-cent gas tax.

Givhan offered the following numbers for the potential increase in gas taxes:

12 cents total
8 cents to Alabama Department of Transportation to continue using at their current discretion
3 cents to counties
1 cent to cities

It is important to note that these taxes do not stay in the cities/counties in which they are collected. The counties share will be divided in two ways: Half will be divided by population, the other half will be divided equally amongst the 67 counties in the state with Dale County and Jefferson County receiving the same amount, Givhan explained.

Givhan made it clear this current strategy was going to have a hard time finding support in the Alabama legislature, adding he is a “no” vote on this proposal as outlined.

The state senator from Huntsville explained that building roads as an economic stimulant is a waste of money and instead wants the state to focus on the state’s major arteries and Interstates that are “largely overcapacity,” mentioning I-10, I-65, I-20, I-565 and more by name.

Givhan said he wants a strategy that is not based on geography, but rather on need.

“The most important thing we can do for our state is expanding capacity on the Interstate. You know building new roads in new parts of the state is just folly in my mind,” he outlined.

Additionally, Givhan mentioned a “sunset” clause, which would set the desired goal (dollar figure or time period) for the revenue raised and then end the gas tax after that is accomplished.

My takeaway:

Givhan’s concerns offer the first public look into the ongoing gas tax debate and should lead us to believe that this is not as much of a slam dunk as most seem to believe.

Listen:

@TheDaleJackson is a contributing writer to Yellowhammer News and hosts a talk show from 7-11 am weekdays on WVNN

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