3 things contributing to the U.S. drop in life expectancy


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 MULTI-YEAR LIFE EXPECTANCY DROP NOT SEEN SINCE ’60s

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, statistic out of World Magazine: “U.S. Life Expectancy in 2016 Drop for The Second Straight Year.” An Average Adult can now expect to live 78.6 years with a five-year gap between life spans of men and women. This multi-year drop is the first since 1962 and 1963. Bob Anderson of The National Health Center for Health Statistics told reporters he cannot say whether a trend is developing, but he is worried about the steady mortality rate among opioid addicts.

If 2017 had another increase in such deaths, it could signal a third straight drop in life expectancy data for the first time since the Spanish Flu epidemic 100 years ago.

BIBLICAL AND HISTORICAL LENS

DR. REEDER: And what’s very interesting now, from a Biblical world and life view on that item, Tom, how our Lord, after the flood, declared that man would live 70 – three score plus ten or four score by “reason of strength and very healthy.” The average has increasingly moved toward what the Lord said.

In other words, prior to the flood, man, who was made to live forever, because of sin now has the curse of death. And so, you see this genealogy in the Old Testament where each seceding generation – except for one or two exceptions – of those listed in the early genealogy of humanity live less years and there is a decreasing.

Then you get to the flood and it’s now decreased dramatically. And, after the flood, the Lord says that it is going to decrease even more dramatically – which it does within a generation – and it decreases down into, historically, the 30s, the 40s, the 50s. A 50-something year old man, 300 years ago, was an old man because of the destruction of diseases that the curse of sin has brought into this world.

But then, in his common grace, gives us medicine, gives us an understanding of His creation laws and we begin to bring the influence of compassion and care, the infant mortality rate goes down, we have inoculations. Western civilizations’ influence, which was influenced by Christianity in the Reformation, you have this rising of the life expectancy so that we have increasingly come close to what the Lord had ordained and had prophesied as it were, that is, three score and ten and four score by reason of strength.

THE PAST 100 YEARS IN AMERICA TRENDED UP

Now, there have been blips on the screen in the last couple of hundred years where it has reversed itself and gone the other way. You just mentioned one, the early ‘60s, that most people associate with what then was called “the Asian Flu” that ravaged the world. About 100 years ago was the previous time where you had multiple years of decreasing life expectancy and almost everyone agrees with the analysis that was because of the Spanish Flu.

Social Security was designed when the life expectancy was in the upper 60s and retirement at 65 so you would get your checks for three or four years. Well, now, people are living up closer to 80. You actually have the statistics for men and women, particularly.

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Yeah, right now, men, 76.1 years, women, 81.1 years.

DR. REEDER: That gap is closing between men and women and a lot of people feel it’s because of the changes of lifestyle of men and women with the egalitarian movement – they now have the blessing of dying quicker.

WHAT’S CAUSING THE DECREASE?

We look at this movement of a multi-year decrease, why is it? Well, I would suggest three things that are contributing to it.

— First, a loss of focus upon valuing life and, thereby, protecting life, preserving life and caring for life which results in extending life through the medical profession. We now are hiring doctors to kill us. Now, I’m not saying that the number of assisted suicides – and mandated suicides, in some nations – but I do believe, when you get a Hippocratic Oath that tells you, “You will do nothing to harm life,” and now you have taken the medical profession, not simply to harm life, but to end life, that has an effect throughout all of the medical profession, making it much more of a formal profession then a professional calling.

Doctors, like ministers, were seen with a calling in the past that was life-oriented: ministers as the physicians of the soul and doctors as physicians of the body, but all valued life. I think that loss of valuing life is showing up in the medical care that’s given and the way it’s given and the advancements that are no longer being made because of the increasing socialization and governmental control of health care.

— The second thing that I would mention, right now, since Roe v. Wade, we have killed over 60 million children. Now, Tom, if you take the statistic of 60 million plus over these last years of the results of Roe v. Wade, my goodness, what would that statistic then look like? How many lives we have taken that were unborn, but yet were lives made in the image of God?

— And then, Tom, let me mention a third area in the news article that you pointed us to – in our society of escapism, in our society of Libertarianism, in our society of moral relativism and self-absorption, we now have gateway drugs such as marijuana leading people through the gate of drug use, prescription drug addictions, cocaine, heroin, and various other mechanisms of increased addiction.

And please know that in my generation that experimented with marijuana, the marijuana that came from the plants of my generation and the cultured marijuana of this generation is night and day in terms of its destructive powers.

And now we have this opioid addiction that is devastating. We have certain states, particularly in the northeast, that are being absolutely devastated by this. And opioid users are usually dying at young ages so I think the article was right to point us in that direction. While we don’t have a flu epidemic, we do have an opioid epidemic and that is, again, the result of our cultural devolution.

DOES ABORTION FACTOR IN?

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, is it possible the statistics are actually worse than what we’re seeing? And I say that because, when you look at abortion, how many kids are diagnosed in the womb of having some flaw and the doctors recommend an abortion so the parents don’t have to worry about it.

DR. REEDER: People are going to push back and say, “Well, we don’t count abortions.” My point is the very act, itself, has an effect upon how we are dealing with life and how we value life and let me give you an example of that. Tom, do you remember, recently, that horrific church shooting in Sutherland, Texas?

Well, there was a big debate because you would look at articles – and I can’t remember the exact numbers, I should have done some research but let me just go ahead and use some numbers and I think I’m accurate – some reports said 28 had been killed and some said 27 had been killed and a paper said, “Who was right on those statistics?” Those who used the number 28 were acknowledging the fact that one of the people killed was a young woman who was pregnant and, when she died, the baby died.

Now, what’s interesting is, in our secular world and life view, we don’t count that as a life but, in the province of God, He counts it as a life, which is why there was a penalty upon those who would take the life of a woman with child in the Old Testament – they were guilty of a capital crime when they had done that against the child or if they had caused the death of a child because that is a person that is there.

Which, again, Tom, is why many of us continue to remember on the Sanctity of Life Sunday the horrific issue that abortion is and what it is doing to the soul of a nation, as well as to the lives of unborn children and women in crisis pregnancies.

TOMORROW’S FOCUS: CHRISTIANS IN PERSECUTION

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, on Wednesday’s edition of Today in Perspective, another set of statistics are in and they’re not good. The number of Christians murdered across the world in persecution, more than 3,000 in 2017.

DR. REEDER: Approximately 10 percent of professing Christians live in nations that are in the top ten of persecuting Christians – 1 out of every 10 of my brothers and sisters in Christ wake up every day in fear of governmental enforced and approved death because they are a Christian. What does the Bible say that we’re to do with that? May I ask our listeners to read a text and join us tomorrow? Read Hebrews 13:3 and I’ll see you tomorrow.

Dr. Harry L. Reeder III is the Senior Pastor of Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham.

This podcast was transcribed by Jessica Havin. Jessica is editorial assistant for Yellowhammer News. Jessica has transcribed some of the top podcasts in the country and her work has been featured in a New York Times Bestseller.

36 mins ago

DeVonta Smith accepts Senior Bowl invitation

To the pleasant surprise of many, University of Alabama star wide receiver DeVonta Smith has accepted an invitation to participate in the 2021 Senior Bowl, to be held January 30 in Mobile, Alabama.

This year’s Senior Bowl and the week of practices, workouts and interviews before the game will look a little different due to COVID-19 protocols, however the annual showcase will still be a premier scouting opportunity for NFL prospects and teams.

The game itself is already sold out (with limited capacity) for its first-ever game to be played in the state-of-the-art Hancock Whitney Stadium located on the campus of the University of South Alabama.

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Now, the event has added the Heisman Trophy winner to the list of elite prospects who have accepted the Senior Bowl’s prestigious invitation to play in the game.

Smith, a two-time national champion for the Crimson Tide, will be added to the roster of either the American team or National team.

The staffs of the Carolina Panthers and Miami Dolphins will coach the respective teams. Miami owns both the third pick and 18th pick in this spring’s draft, and the Panthers have pick No. 8.

One incentive for Smith to participate in the Senior Bowl is the difference in contract values between top picks; looking at last year’s numbers, there was a $10 million difference in picks No. 3 and No. 7, for example.

The Senior Bowl’s website also says that Alabama offensive linemen Alex Leatherwood, Landon Dickerson and Deonte Brown and long snapper Thomas Fletcher have accepted invitations.

Looking around the Yellowhammer State, Auburn’s KJ Britt, South Alabama’s Riley Cole, and UAB’s Jordan Smith and Austin Watkins, Jr. have also reportedly accepted Senior Bowl invitations.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

5 hours ago

State Sen. Allen opposes Alabama Memorial Preservation Act repeal — Says it is ‘important’ to protect history

Last month, State Sen. Gerald Allen (R-Tuscaloosa) said he anticipated efforts to change the Alabama Memorial Preservation Act, which he had sponsored in 2017.

The law has been in the news as of late given the rise of the so-called Black Lives Matter protest movement, responding to the death of George Floyd while in custody of the Minneapolis police. The cities of Birmingham and Mobile moved to take down Confederate memorials, in violation of the law.

During an appearance on Alabama Public Television’s “Capitol Journal,” Allen echoed his expectations but said he was opposed to any efforts to repeal the law outright.

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“Just like I said in the past, it is so important, and it is something that we need to be careful with and to protect it,” Allen explained. “It is what it is, and there are some things that took place in history that are shameful, and ugly, and disgraceful — but it is what it is and tells a story about who we are and where we come from. In fact, so many events have taken place here in Alabama and across this great country that represents some major, major policy changes. Some of those events took place in this great state. Certainly, I just think for our generation and generations to follow each of us and for four or five generations down the line, for you to be able to tell the complete story on what exactly took place and how we got to where we are — to be able to tell that story I think is very important.”

“If you start removing things and start saying that things shouldn’t exist — I think we need to be of open mind and about how important it is to project history,” he added. “It is a real issue to some. Certainly, I understand that. But it is history.”

APTV host Don Dailey asked Allen if he was open to “tweaks” but opposed a full repeal, which Allen warned a repeal would have consequences.

“I think we’ll be doing a great disjustice to history to go that far with it and to put it in such a way where currently if there is a mechanism in place, and it is a very good process in which individuals must go through, and it is one of those kinds of steps that we put in place to guarantee how we’re going to observe history and protect history as well,” he said.

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University and the University of South Alabama, the editor of Breitbart TV, a columnist for Mobile’s Lagniappe Weekly, and host of Mobile’s “The Jeff Poor Show” from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. on FM Talk 106.5.

5 hours ago

U.S. Rep. Aderholt: Donald Trump, Mo Brooks remarks didn’t rise to the level of inciting violence — U.S. Capitol riot was ‘premeditated’

President Donald Trump and U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Huntsville) are facing threats of repercussions for speaking at a rally in the lead-up to the riots on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. earlier this month.

Trump has since been impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives, and Brooks is facing threats of a censure resolution by the same body.

However, during an interview with Alabama Public Television, Brooks’ colleague U.S. Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-Haleyville), a “no” vote on impeachment, said while they may have been ill-advised, neither of their remarks rose to the level of inciting violence.

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“I don’t think it was an impeachable offense,” he said of Trump. “If you look at what he said, and I looked at them, they were not I don’t think would nearly rise to that level. Obviously, he, like so many Americans, were concerned about the outcome of the election that occurred back in November — not just the outcome but the way it was handled, and the way the laws were not really in compliance with — and a lot of this really dealt with COVID-19 and the way the states were doing things. We could talk about that for an hour but let me just say that I don’t think that his actions were something that would rise to impeachment. If you look at the actions of those that were rioting in the Capitol, they were there and had a plan well before Donald Trump spoke to the people there for the Electoral College vote. They wouldn’t have had time for them to leave there, get the necessary equipment that some of them had — like the ties we’ve seen in the photos, several other objects that they had. That was something that had to be premeditated.”

He added the “vast majority” of the people at the protest event in Washington, D.C. that day were not a part of the rioting at the U.S. Capitol.

“I’ve looked at the words the president used that day and he in no way from the words that I have seen in the transcripts, that he in any way tried to incite any riots. I think those that would say so are just looking for some reason to try to fail the president.”

“Capitol Journal” anchor Don Dailey then asked Aderholt about Brooks, who Aderholt described as being “very passionate” but not responsible for the U.S. Capitol violence.

“If you know Congressman Brooks, he’s very passionate,” Aderholt added. “But again, I don’t think that what he said caused the rioters to go in. Again, they had to have had a plan well before Congressman Brooks spoke. I think looking back, his words could have been chosen differently. I think he could have made his point without using some of the words he did. But I don’t think it rose to the level of inciting the violence that did occur. Hindsight is always 20/20, and I know that he’s been very committed in what his comments were, I think perhaps he would have chosen those words differently had he known the outcome. But obviously, if you know Congressman Brooks, he’s very passionate on whatever issue he works on, and I think that was part of the day there that he was concerned like many of us were — that the electoral votes that were going to be counted — there were a lot of questions. We can’t move forward in this country if we have a lot of people questioning going to the ballot and making sure their vote is counted. If we start down that path, then I think it’s the end of our democracy as we know it because people have got to have the confidence when their vote is cast, their vote is not going to be put in with votes that are not credible and that are questionable.”

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University and the University of South Alabama, the editor of Breitbart TV, a columnist for Mobile’s Lagniappe Weekly, and host of Mobile’s “The Jeff Poor Show” from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. on FM Talk 106.5.

18 hours ago

NASA successfully ignites engines on Huntsville-managed SLS core stage, collects valuable data

NASA on Saturday conducted a hot fire of the core stage for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket that is scheduled to launch the Artemis I mission to the moon later this year.

The hot fire was the final test of the eight-part, 12-month Green Run series, conducted at Mississippi’s Stennis Space Center.

SLS is the world’s most powerful ever rocket that will power America’s next-generation moon missions and subsequent crewed missions to Mars. Alabama’s aerospace industry has led the effort to build the SLS, which stands 212 feet high and 27.6 feet in diameter.

Boeing is the core stage lead contractor, and Aerojet Rocketdyne is the RS-25 engines lead contractor. The SLS program is managed out of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, while Boeing’s Huntsville-based Space and Launch division manages the company’s SLS work.

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The hot fire test plan called for the rocket’s four RS-25 engines to fire for a little more than eight minutes – the same amount of time it will take to send the rocket to space following launch.

The team successfully completed the countdown and ignited the engines, however the engines shut down a little more than one minute into the hot fire. Teams are assessing the data to determine what caused the early shutdown and will determine a path forward, per a release from NASA.

During the test, the core stage generated 1.6 million pounds of thrust while anchored in the historic B-2 Test Stand. The hot fire included loading 733,000 pounds of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen – mirroring the launch countdown procedure.

“Saturday’s test was an important step forward to ensure that the core stage of the SLS rocket is ready for the Artemis I mission, and to carry crew on future missions,” stated NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, who attended the test. “Although the engines did not fire for the full duration, the team successfully worked through the countdown, ignited the engines, and gained valuable data to inform our path forward.”

Support teams across the Stennis test complex reportedly provided high-pressure gases to the test stand, delivered all operational electrical power, supplied more than 330,000 gallons of water per minute to protect the test stand flame deflector and ensure the structural integrity of the core stage, and captured data needed to evaluate the core stage performance.

“Seeing all four engines ignite for the first time during the core stage hot fire test was a big milestone for the Space Launch System team” said John Honeycutt, the SLS program manager at Marshall. “We will analyze the data, and what we learned from today’s test will help us plan the right path forward for verifying this new core stage is ready for flight on the Artemis I mission.”

Overall, the hot fire represented a milestone for American space exploration.

“Stennis has not witnessed this level of power since the testing of Saturn V stages in the 1960s,” commented Stennis Center Director Rick Gilbrech. “Stennis is the premier rocket propulsion facility that tested the Saturn V first and second stages that carried humans to the Moon during the Apollo Program, and now, this hot fire is exactly why we test like we fly and fly like we test. We will learn from today’s early shutdown, identify any corrections if needed, and move forward.”

You can watch the hot fire here.

Under the Artemis program, NASA is working to land the first woman and the next man on the moon in 2024 through Artemis III.

Artemis I will be the first integrated flight test of SLS and the Orion spacecraft. This will be an uncrewed test flight. Artemis II is slated to be the first crewed flight for the program.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

19 hours ago

USDA, Alabama sign historic agreement to improve forests on public, private lands

U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary James Hubbard and Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed a shared stewardship agreement Jan. 12 to ensure the long-term sustainability of public and private lands in the state.

The agreement signed in an online ceremony is among USDA’s Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and the Alabama Forestry Commission.

Shared Stewardship agreements establish a framework for federal and state agencies to collaborate better, focus on accomplishing mutual goals, further common interests and effectively respond to the increasing ecological challenges and natural resource concerns.

“Shared stewardship provides an incredible opportunity to work with the state of Alabama to set stewardship priorities together,” Hubbard said. “We will combine our mutual skills and assets to achieve cross-boundary outcomes desired by all.”

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This agreement centers on USDA’s commitment to work with states and other partners to use the best available science to identify high-priority forests that need treatment.

“From our rolling mountains to our sparkling coast, the world can understand why they call it ‘Alabama the Beautiful,’” Ivey said. “I am pleased that we can build on the conservation efforts already happening through these strong federal and state partnerships. I look forward to our state continually working for the good of the people as well as our natural resources and to preserve our beautiful state for generations to come.”

Alabama becomes the seventh state in the South and 23rd in the nation to sign such an agreement to strengthen partnerships to increase the scope and scale of critical forest treatments that support communities and improve forest conditions.

“We look forward to continuing to work together with our partner agencies under this shared stewardship agreement,” said ADCNR Commissioner Chris Blankenship. “This agreement memorializes a lot of the good work we have already been doing together to manage the resources and enhance our beautiful state, and it adds new areas where we can grow our partnerships.”

The agreement can be found at https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/shared-stewardship.

(Courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter)