Where the death culture leads: Lawsuits over disabled children who ‘should’ have been aborted


 

 

 

 

 

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TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, I want to take you to two stories today. Both deal with pro-life issues. The first is out of Fox News. The Justice Department has launched federal investigation into Planned Parenthood practices and the sale of fetal tissue. In a letter first obtained by Fox News, Justice Department Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Affairs Stephen Boyd formally requested unredacted documents from the Senate Judiciary Committee, the same panel that led the congressional probe into the Women’s Health Organization.

 The second story’s out of National Review. It’s a story by Kristan Hawkins and, basically, the story deals with an editor of New York Magazine writing that, because her son was born with cystic fibrosis, she is now suing the doctors because she should have aborted her son.

 The point that Kristan makes is, one day, this son is going to grow up to read this story.

DR. REEDER: Tom, that was an amazing story, wasn’t it? By the way, let me refer to the writer of this story, Jean Gann, that Kristan Hawkins writes about.

WISHING HER CHILD WERE DEAD

She writes this piece about her lawsuit of wrongful birth in which she is claiming the doctors are responsible and is seeking monetary relief from the treatments that she is now required to give to her son who has cystic fibrosis and is also attempting to put a marker down, which, again, will be quite the dampening effect in the medical field in terms of this claim that she should have had better diagnostic information so that she could have aborted the child and should have been informed of the option to abort the child.

Think if you are her child, Dudley, and you grow up and you find out that your mother is basically saying, “You have been so inconvenient that I wish I had killed you in the womb.” What a message to your son.

Now, cystic fibrosis is a challenging situation. I have the enormous privilege of being a pastor to parents who are dealing with that. I have not met any that would ever have taken such a position such as this, even in their wildest moments of frustration, but I believe that’s because the ones that I have the privilege to pastor call upon the grace of the Lord Jesus and realize that, in life, you are faced with challenges because we’re in a broken world and then to bring the grace of the Lord Jesus to bear in the life of their child.

Obviously, the writer of this article knows of no such motivation at this point in time, although I do pray that God’s saving grace would break into her life.

Let me also mention, the writer of The National Review article, Kristan Hawkins, I follow her regularly. She is, perhaps, one of the most effective and principled warriors for the sanctity of life that is currently present today.

WHY ABORTION EXISTS

What you see here is, again, the unabashed testimony that abortion exists for two reasons:

  • To wipe out the effects of the sexual revolution when it leads to unwanted pregnancies.
  • To eradicate any children that are not governed worthy of our parenting. Because of their imperfections, they are no longer worthy of our parenting or, the anticipated cost of parenting them, then we want no part of it and we ought to have the right to destroy their lives.

On the altar of convenience, if we have children that are deemed less than perfect, less than acceptable, our parenting them because of their physical or medical conditions would be beyond the scope of what we would want to be bothered with.

What a society that we have developed with that world and life view.

By the way, Kristan Hawkins, as the news story reveals, this is a woman who is raising two children with cystic fibrosis. There are those who, by the grace of God show the grace of God and the strength of God to deal with these issues.

And that’s why I am so grateful for the other news story that you gave. If you remember, David Daleiden and his staff, they had done all of videos as they would interact with Planned Parenthood officials and what was uncovered was the callousness of destroying the lives of children for profit and using mechanisms so that they could save body parts and make money from that.

All of this was, of course, criminal and, somehow, it got swept away – somehow, even the tables were turned on The Center for Medical Progress but, now, Senator Grassley’s going to go back and pick up their material and he’s going to do the investigation into the, dare I say it, bowels of Planned Parenthood and I am so happy for that.

WHY I HATE ABORTION

Tom, let me just go ahead and state it as clearly as I can: I hate abortion.

I will recognize that there comes a time in treating a woman that the triage principles may cost the life of the unborn baby, but that is less than 2 percent of any statistical analysis of pregnancies that come to the birth process.

Having said that, I utterly hate abortion and all of the world and life view it represents. It exists as the sacrament of the sexual revolution – you must believe it, you must embrace it because that’s the way you can erase the unwanted consequences of the sexual revolution when it issues forth in a child.

Secondly, it exists to get rid of inconvenient children like this young little boy who is now going to grow up and read an article where his mother says, “I not only wish I’d killed you, I am going to make money off of those who didn’t recommend for me to kill you,” and that is where we exist in this death culture.

I utterly hate it and I know there is only one remedy and that is to come back to the sanctity of life through a God-centered world and life view of a sovereign God who is at work in a broken world and provides us both the strength, and the power and the resources to deal with difficult situations, even as He graciously deals with the brokenness of our sin by giving His Son, Jesus Christ, on the cross to save us from our sins.

There is the One who was willing to take our sin upon Himself that we might have life.

We have to get back to a saturation of the Gospel from the church of Jesus Christ into this world and discipleship within the church so that Christians learn to think clearly.

A PERSON IS A PERSON NO MATTER HOW SMALL

That would be a premise in our world and life view of the sanctity of life and there’s nothing more sacred than life in the womb and, also, that we believe that a person is made in the image of God and we agree with our founding fathers that they have the inalienable right to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness to whatever degree that they can, no matter what the condition is that they face medically when they’re born into this world and a person is a person from the moment of conception made in the image of God, no matter where they are in the stage of development in human life and no matter what challenges they face in those stages of development of human life.

May God grant us, again, that sacred principle of the sanctity of life and we will continue to deal with that from this program and we ask believers to not only join us to again affirm the sanctity of life through crisis pregnancy centers, adoption agencies, ministry to children who are born with medical difficulties, and mercy ministries caring for women in crisis pregnancies, challenging men to be men in terms of their responsibilities in fatherhood – all of those things, that full-orbed dynamic that we would ask believers to join us in.

And may God allow us to get the root of it in place, which is the glorious Gospel of life that comes through Jesus Christ, life that is meaningful for eternity and that means the church must again not only proclaim the Gospel that people would be invited to Christ, but use the gospel and the entire whole council of God in His word to disciple believers that we might live consistently for the God of glory and grace that has saved us and that includes the sanctity of life.

Dr. Harry L. Reeder III is the Senior Pastor of Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham.

This podcast was transcribed by Jessica Havin. Jessica is editorial assistant for Yellowhammer News. Jessica has transcribed some of the top podcasts in the country and her work has been featured in a New York Times Bestseller.

43 mins ago

Gus Malzahn: Auburn ready to host Kentucky, kick off delayed season

Auburn coach Gus Malzahn said he is happy game week has finally arrived, even though he knows his Auburn Tigers football team will be tested by the visiting Kentucky Wildcats.

“It’s been a long time coming to get to this point,” Malzahn said. “We’re playing a really good Kentucky Wildcat team. When you look at them offensively, last year they were one of the best rushing teams in all of college football. To be able to do that in this league says a lot.”

But Malzahn said he is also impressed by his own squad.

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“Overall, I’m really excited about this year’s team,” he said. “We have all kinds of new faces out there. I believe we have 13 new starters, so I’m really excited to watch this team grow. I really feel that if we stay healthy, we’ll have a chance to improve each game, and of course with 10 SEC games, it’s important for teams to improve throughout the year. I’m really looking forward to watching our guys play. I’m excited.”

Auburn hosts the Wildcats at 11 a.m. Sept. 26 at Jordan-Hare Stadium. The game will be televised on the SEC Network.

Gus Malzahn: Kentucky presents a challenge for Auburn’s opener from Alabama NewsCenter on Vimeo.

(Courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter)

2 hours ago

Gulf State Park section succumbs to Sally’s surge

One aspect of living on Alabama’s beautiful Gulf Coast is the realization that the best-laid plan is no match for Mother Nature.

The original plan was to gather on September 16 at the Gulf State Park Pier to celebrate the grand reopening of the 1,542-foot pier after a $2.4 million renovation.

Although I’m a veteran of many tropical storms and hurricanes in my 28 years on the Gulf Coast, including back-to-back hits by Ivan and Katrina, the system that turned into Hurricane Sally threw me and many Gulf Coast residents a wicked curveball.

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Off to bed with a predicted peak of 85 mph winds, I was awakened by an ominous roar. With one peek through the high windows on our vibrating front door, it was obvious this was not a clone of Hurricane Danny from 1997 that dumped copious amounts of rain on the area but did not have the wind-damage potential of Sally.

As Gulf Shores Mayor Robert Craft said, “Sally sucker-punched us.”

Sally made landfall in Gulf Shores in the early hours of September 16 as a strong Category 2 hurricane with winds clocked at 105 mph. A wind-speed detector on a nearby tower clocked a 121-mph gust.

However, Sally’s brutality was magnified by her crawling forward speed of 2 mph, which made the incessant winds seem to last forever. Like my friend Dwight Lores said, “A human can easily walk at 3 miles per hour. That’s why Sally did so much damage.”

When the first hint of sunrise allowed a minimal assessment through the aforementioned door, trees were down in every direction. Unlike many Baldwin County homes, thankfully ours was not damaged by any of the falling trees, but it was almost three days before we could even leave our driveway. On the fourth day, a utility crew from Warren County, Kentucky, restored our power, a remarkable feat considering the extent of the damage. All hail to a hot shower.

Of course, I prayed for the best for everybody on the Alabama coast, but I feared it was not going to be the outcome we wished, especially for those structures vulnerable to storm surge.

I soon got word through the little cell service available that the northern Gulf Coast’s premier fishing and educational pier, which opened in 2009 after Ivan razed the previous pier, had succumbed to the constant battering of Sally’s surge.

The section of pier closest to the end octagon was gone. The majority of the blowout deck panels were scattered all along the sugar-sand shoreline.

The good news is the new Lodge at Gulf State Park and nearby structures were relatively unscathed because those buildings were designed to withstand winds of up to 150 mph.

Chris Blankenship, Commissioner of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR), and Greg Lein, Alabama State Parks Director, were able to perform cursory assessments late last week.

“We had damage in places we didn’t expect, and in other places where I expected to have a lot of damage, it turned out to be not as bad,” said Commissioner Blankenship, who toured the area with Governor Kay Ivey last Friday. “The damage to the pier is the most obvious that everybody has seen on TV and had the most questions about. We were very surprised by the amount of damage to the pier. The cabins at Gulf State Park on Lake Shelby took a beating. I’m afraid a lot of them will be total losses. But I was pleasantly surprised by how the dune system held up on the beach. And the Lodge at Gulf State Park, which was built to fortified building standards, fared very well during the storm. The FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Administration) administrator was there, and we showed him the Lodge. He was very impressed with the resilience of the Lodge and how building to that standard has a big impact on the recovery.”

Commissioner Blankenship said divers are scheduled to assess the damage to the pier and determine the structural integrity of the remaining pilings.

“After that is finished, we will be able to make plans to get the pier reopened at least to the part where it broke off while we repair the entire structure back out to the octagon,” he said.

Director Lein said the campground at Gulf State Park suffered quite a bit of damage.

“It wasn’t until Friday that staff was able to access all of the park and assess the damage because of the water and downed trees,” Lein said. “A lot of the electrical distribution panels in the campground were impacted. That system will have to be assessed by an electrician to see what repairs are needed. Now that the conditions have improved, we’ve been able to clear all the campsite pads. All the modern buildings at the park appear to be okay. A couple of campers that were left on the site were tipped over by the wind. A few of the campers in the storage area were pushed together, but only one was overturned.”

The cabins and cottages on Lake Shelby highlighted how construction standards can make a big difference in potential damage.

“The cabins suffered major damage,” Lein said. “They lost portions of their roofs. Some of the walls collapsed. It appeared the wind got under the roofs in the porch areas and ripped them off. On the cottages, the roofs are intact. The older cabins had significant damage, but the modern cottages were not as affected.”

Lein said the good news about the pier is that the staff has been able to recover more than 200 of the deck panels that are designed to blow out to protect the infrastructure.

“They found some about 4 miles down the beach,” Lein said. “A couple were found in swimming pools down there. It’s amazing our crew has been able to recover so many panels. The pier will be inspected. If it’s structurally okay, we’ll be able to put a lot of those panels back, and we may be able to reopen a portion of the pier. The pier house appeared to not have any damage.”

Lein said strike teams were formed several years ago in each district of the State Parks system to assist in natural disasters. The teams are comprised of employees capable of running chainsaws, skid steers, backhoes and tractors.

“We had more than a dozen strike team members down there to join the men and women from Gulf State Park, working together as one team to clear roads and paths so support personnel had access to all of the park,” Lein said. “They achieved a huge amount of relief to the park in three days. They brought generators with them to power part of the Lodge and the park office. I can’t say enough about the strike teams and how successful their deployment was in supporting the Gulf State Park staff. The crews were all fed by the chef and staff at the Lodge’s Food Craft restaurant, and that was such a morale booster for the teams to get a warm meal.”

Commissioner Blankenship said he has been impressed by the spirit of cooperation and willingness of folks who don’t live on the Gulf Coast to lend a helping hand.

“I appreciate our strike teams that came down to assist at Gulf State Park,” he said. “They have done a great job of cleaning up the park. It will help us get the park reopened a lot quicker, and it allows for some of our employees who rode out the storm to take care of their families and limit the damage done to their homes. That’s extremely important. Every single employee was without power for a certain amount of time and had damage at their residences they needed to attend to. Having people come in from areas that weren’t impacted helped those affected people. It is very important to me to have our employees taken care of.”

Meanwhile, Commissioner Blankenship said the Alabama Marine Resources Division (MRD) facilities in Dauphin Island sustained significant damage. The MRD office building suffered roof damage, and the docks at the office were destroyed.

“But Meaher State Park on the Causeway and 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center seemed to do okay,” he said. “There were trees down but not a lot of other damage.”

David Rainer is an award-winning writer who has covered Alabama’s great outdoors for 25 years. The former outdoors editor at the Mobile Press-Register, he writes for Outdoor Alabama, the website of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

14 hours ago

New COVID-19 cases at the University of Alabama down 95% from three weeks ago; Less than 2% of isolation space being used

The University of Alabama System on Friday afternoon released its weekly update with COVID-19 related data from each of its three distinct institutions: the University of Alabama, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).

The data — covering the seven-day period from Friday, September 18, through Thursday, September 24 — was impressive for all three universities.

The University of Alabama saw yet another incredible decline in the number of new cases week-over-week.

Only 48 students tested positive at UA during the latest period, a 60% decrease from the week prior and a monumental 95% decrease from earlier in the month.

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Another great sign is that UA set a record high for the amount of quarantine/isolation rooms available on-campus. Only 1.74% of these rooms are occupied (9/518), down from 3.88% seven days ago.

Additionally, numbers at UAB and UAH continue to look strong. In Birmingham, 16 students tested positive compared to 13 at UAH. These are both week-over-week decreases.

At UAB, zero isolation rooms are being used — a landmark feat; at UAH, 25.9% of isolation rooms are in use (22/87 rooms), a slight improvement from the previous week.

A release from the System advised, “No cases have been traced to contact in the classroom on any of the three campuses. There are no reports of current hospitalization.”

Finally, sentinel testing of students, faculty and staff is ongoing System-wide, with less than 1% of individuals from this form of sample testing being positive. A release from the System advised this indicates “virus mitigation strategies are effective and there is a very low rate of asymptomatic positive cases throughout the UA System.”

Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, has credited the “strong leadership” and meticulous planning of the UA System for its successful return-to-campus efforts.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

14 hours ago

Tommy Tuberville endorsed by another major pro-life group — ‘Jones is unfit’

The pro-life Susan B. Anthony List’s political arm on Friday announced its endorsement of Republican Tommy Tuberville for the United States Senate.

Tuberville, who previously was endorsed by the National Right to Life Committee, is running against U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) in the November 3 general election.

“For two years the pro-life values of Alabamians have been ignored and derided by pro-abortion Senator Doug Jones. That’s why it is imperative that Alabama elects Coach Tommy Tuberville to the U.S. Senate,” stated SBA List president Marjorie Dannenfelser.

This comes after SBA List recently rated Jones with an “F” grade in its annual scorecard of incumbent members of Congress.

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Jones has been a staunch pro-abortion advocate while in the U.S. Senate, previously voting against the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act two separate times. That legislation would prohibit abortion after 20 weeks’ gestation based on scientific research suggesting that fetuses are capable of feeling pain by that point in pregnancy, per National Review. A report released recently suggested that fetal pain is in fact possible even earlier in pregnancy than 20 weeks.

Alabama’s junior U.S. senator also previously voted against banning using federal funds for abortions.

“Earlier this year, Coach Tuberville’s opponent Doug Jones laughed off the issue of painful late-term abortion and called it ‘stupid’. Doug Jones went so far as to vote in favor of late-term abortion and was demoted to an ‘F’ grade on our National Pro-Life Scorecard,” Dannenfelser added. “In contrast, Coach Tuberville is 100% pro-life and will be an outspoken voice for the unborn. Just as he delivered victory on the football field, we have full confidence that he will deliver big wins for the pro-life movement.”

In a statement to Yellowhammer News, Tuberville welcomed the endorsement.

“I’m proud to have the endorsement of one of the nation’s most active and respected pro-life organizations,” the former Auburn University head football coach said in a statement to Yellowhammer News.

“In the 47 years since Roe v. Wade was handed down, more than 60 million unborn lives have been senselessly taken,” Tuberville continued. “As Alabama’s interim senator, Doug Jones has voted to preserve late term abortions and even supports using our taxpayer dollars to fund them. I’ll fight to protect the unborn and vote to confirm judges who will overturn the travesty known as Roe v. Wade. It’s time to replace Doug Jones with a senator who will represent our conservative Alabama values, not the California and New York values of his liberal campaign donors.”

The endorsement came the same day that Jones confirmed that he will not consider the merits of President Donald Trump’s next Supreme Court of the United States nominee, who will be announced by the president on Saturday evening.

“I will not support the confirmation of any Supreme Court justice nominee, regardless of who it might be — I will not support that nominee — before the outcome of the November 3 election has been determined,” Jones said.

“Senator Doug Jones betrayed Alabamians when he voted against Justice Kavanaugh and has betrayed them again today, before President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee has even been named,” Dannenfelser said in a separate statement.

“During his short time in office, Jones has proven to be an extremist, repeatedly siding against constituents and voting with the most radical members of his party – like Kamala Harris – in favor of abortion on demand through birth, paid for by taxpayers. … Jones is unfit to represent the pro-life, pro-Trump state of Alabama and will be held accountable at the ballot box,” she concluded.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

15 hours ago

‘No griping’: Baldwin County elected officials told to not complain about state’s Hurricane Sally response efforts during call with Ivey administration

Hurricane Sally made landfall on September 16 near Gulf Shores, and it left hundreds of millions of dollars of damage and more than 500,000 without power in its wake.

The most-significant damage within Alabama occurred in Baldwin County. However, media reports have indicated the response at the state government level had left much to be desired given emergency supplies were slow to arrive at storm-battered areas.

Tuesday, Gov. Kay Ivey’s office hosted a conference call that included mayors, county commissioners and members of the legislature from Baldwin County regarding the State of Alabama’s role in the Hurricane Sally response. However, according to State Sen. Chris Elliott (R-Daphne), whose district includes where the storm made landfall, those local officials were instructed not to complain about the state’s response during that phone call by Ivey chief of staff Jo Bonner and deputy chief of staff Liz Filmore.

During an interview with Mobile radio’s FM Talk 106.5 on Friday, Elliott offered his account of the call with Bonner and Filmore, which he said had the two elected officials on the call instructed not to gripe on seven occasions.

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“You know, that was one of the things that was frustrating — an opportunity to try to communicate with the Governor’s office,” he said. “They had a call with mayors, commissioners and the legislative delegation — and they didn’t seem interested in talking about some of the things that really needed some works. As a matter of fact, I heard by my count seven different times that they didn’t want to hear any gripes at all. That was pretty frustrating. I understand during an emergency, you don’t want to dwell on things that are not going well. But at the same time, sometimes you need to figure out a way to actually talk about things that may need some improvements, so they don’t continue to happen, and that’s something we’ve got to get past. The administration has got to be willing to say there are some things that did not go well. We’ve got to be able to have an honest dialogue about what those things were and figure out a way to improve them and not simply gloss over them and say, ‘Everything is great, and there’s no need for improvement.'”

“That came from the chief of staff and the deputy chief of staff,” Elliott replied. “It wasn’t received well by me or other local electeds down here. They said, ‘Gosh, we’re big boys and girls. We need to be able to talk about things that are not working well, especially as they continue to go on if something is not working, let’s try to fix it and fix it now as opposed to simply saying everything is great and we don’t need to look at any other problems.'”

Yellowhammer News confirmed Elliott’s account of the “no griping” instruction with other participants on the call.

Yellowhammer News also reached out to Ivey’s office for comment. Ivey spokeswoman Gina Maiola offered the following emailed response:

It is unfortunate that the tone and content of this phone call is being taken out of context. The Governor’s Office initiated a phone call between the local leaders, legislative delegation and emergency managers in Baldwin County to hear the critical needs from those on the ground in response to the hurricane. At the request of the local officials on the call, Deputy Chief of Staff Liz Filmore set parameters of the discussion in order to have a productive and timely call with a large group. At no point was anyone told they cannot express frustration with our office, but the call should not deviate from the intent – getting help to the people affected by Hurricane Sally. Of course, there will be a time and a place for an after-action report, and we will all want to address areas to improve before the next disaster. However, the governor and our team’s priority remains laser-focused on helping the people of Coastal Alabama recover.

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University and the University of South Alabama, the editor of Breitbart TV, a columnist for Mobile’s Lagniappe Weekly and host of Mobile’s “The Jeff Poor Show” from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. on FM Talk 106.5.