The Wire

  • Dale Jackson: As long as Nancy Worley leads the Alabama Democratic Party, they will remain stuck on the toilet

    Excerpt:

    In December of 2014, Alabama Democratic Party Chairwoman Nancy Worley wrote a Christmas letter, and it included details about an embarrassing ordeal where she was unable to get off the toilet, which is still a pretty good metaphor for Alabama Democrats.

    “April brought another trauma to my knees which balked when I tried to rise from my lowly 14″ commode. Again, I sat for hours awaiting Wade’s scheduled arrival; however, his attempt to lift me was futile—when he pulled me up, he fell backwards and I fell on my knees again. Solution: we installed the tallest available, 17 1/2 inch commode and a pull-up bar on my bathroom wall,” Worley wrote.

    The current head of the Alabama Democratic Party, who just won re-election, has overseen a pretty embarrassing period for her party. The only real victory that she can claim is the election of Senator Doug Jones. But even that victory was nothing to write home about. Most observers believe that election result was more about the national media descending on Roy Moore during the special election than the strength of Worley’s Democratic Party.

    And Jones’ failed wish that Worley be removed shows anyone watching that he doesn’t give her any credit; he wanted her gone and he explained to the Montgomery Advertiser’s Brian Lyman that the Alabama Democratic Party has issues he wants addressed without Worley at the helm:

  • ‘The Lord had his hand on me’: Alabama pastor struck by lightning after church service

    Excerpt:

    Pastor Ricky Adams, of the Argo Church of God in Walker County, was struck by lightning after the church’s service on Sunday.

    The Argo Area Volunteer Fire Department dispatched to the scene and discovered church members already assisting Adams upon their arrival.

    The pastor, who had been hit indirectly by a lightning strike, did not sustain any major injuries and did not even need to be transported to the hospital.

  • Alabama ranks second worst state for having a baby

    Excerpt:

    A newly-published ranking of states judges Alabama to be the 50th best – or 2nd worst – state in which to have a baby.

    The ranking, developed by the personal finance website WalletHub, compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia using four categories: cost, health care, baby-friendliness and family-friendliness.

    Its cost metric includes things like average cost of insurance premiums, cost of newborn screening and average annual cost of early childcare.

West AlabamaWorks! is bridging the gap between workforce and industry

(AlabamaWorks!/Facebook)

The workforce in West Alabama is changing with the help of West AlabamaWorks! They want to let people in the workforce know that being in healthcare does not strictly mean you are just a doctor or a nurse. There are hundreds of other job opportunities out there in hospitals, doctors offices, and insurance. Peggy Sease is Vice President of Human Resources and shares how her experience has led her to the position to work between the workforce and employers. The same goes for Lori Royer, HR Director, as she tells us what the industry is searching for in future candidates: attendance, diligent in all your duties, and have critical thinking skills. Our state has so many talented people, and Lori and Peggy are shrinking the gap between workforce and the industry with West AlabamaWorks!

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Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Presents The Ford Faction podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

Marion Mayor uses tools to prep residents for AlabamaWorks Success Plus Initiative

(Contributed)

By: Dexter Hinton, Mayor of Marion, Alabama

When I was elected in late 2016 as Mayor of Marion, I knew there were certain areas in which our town needed to improve. One was education and work preparedness for those who did not want to attend a four-year college. We had gaps that needed to be filled.

As an Industrial Maintenance and Robotics Instructor at the Career Center in Greene County, I know what resources are available to assist those seeking a job or a skills education. When people come to the center, our team has a plethora of tests, assessments, job listings, resume-building sessions and other items at our disposal to help folks get the right position or training that matches their needs or abilities.

587

As Mayor, I realized we needed to get educational tools to Marion residents, especially after Moller Tech announced that it would be locating in Bibb County, adjacent to Perry County, and bringing 222 jobs with it. But with a small town like Marion (population 3,432) not having a dedicated resource center, we didn’t quite know how to unite the two. Then one day, I attended a Central AlabamaWorks meeting and saw AIDT’s mobile unit, which is the Department of Commerce’s skills education center on wheels.

I spoke with Mikki Ruttan, director of Central AlabamaWorks, after the meeting and asked her about the possibility of getting the unit to our area. I learned it could be customized for the needs of its audience. After numerous discussions with other local leaders, we selected basic resume building and a Ready-to-Work course as the initial offerings. I knew the mobile unit would be key in obtaining career readiness for the citizens of Marion. I also felt that our citizens would welcome the chance to improve their skills and knowledge base.

After dozens of conversations, we got the mobile unit scheduled this past April. We posted and delivered flyers all over the city, announcing when and where the unit would be located, and we created a Facebook page. We had no idea what kind of response we would have for this type of educational opportunity. But, our citizens realized how such training could give them a leg up in the job market. As a result, they turned out in droves to learn more and better position themselves for entry into the job market, or to simply upgrade their skill set.

With Gov. Kay Ivey’s Success Plus initiative rollout a few months ago, I knew we had to get our citizens more training to help them, and our state, reach the goal of 500,000 people with post-high-school credentials by 2025. The mobile training unit seemed like the perfect way to deliver those opportunities to our residents.

After some discussion, we were able to get the unit at The Lincoln School. We focused the training on Ready-to-Work. The classes filled immediately, and a waiting list soon formed. Our people were eager to gain knowledge to improve their lives and that of their families. Once they completed the course, they received credentials as an Alabama Certified Worker; a Career Readiness certificate; a free three-credit-hour course at Wallace Community College Selma (if they had a high school diploma); three credits toward a high school diploma (if they didn’t have one); and a referral to the Selma Career Center for free certificates or degree information from WCC in welding, industrial maintenance, electrical technology or nursing.

The unit has been so popular with our citizens that two classrooms are now being refurbished at The Lincoln School specifically for AIDT courses. This means we will have a permanent place for our people to get not only Ready-to-Work training, but also training in other much-needed professions offered by Wallace, such as cosmetology, carpentry, welding, automotive technician and others.

The excitement continues to build for our city. In fact, AIDT has already completed one Ready-to-Work training with several graduates who have received employment.

With the extra effort by Central AlabamaWorks, AIDT, the Career Centers and the Alabama Community College System – combined with the excitement and work ethic of our citizens – I know Marionites can and will be a valued part of the Success Plus endeavor. I look forward to seeing what our citizens can achieve for themselves, their families and our community.

Marion Mayor uses tools to prep residents for AlabamaWorks Success Plus Initiative

(Contributed)

By: Dexter Hinton, Mayor of Marion, Alabama

When I was elected in late 2016 as Mayor of Marion, I knew there were certain areas in which our town needed to improve. One was education and work preparedness for those who did not want to attend a four-year college. We had gaps that needed to be filled.

As an Industrial Maintenance and Robotics Instructor at the Career Center in Greene County, I know what resources are available to assist those seeking a job or a skills education. When people come to the center, our team has a plethora of tests, assessments, job listings, resume-building sessions and other items at our disposal to help folks get the right position or training that matches their needs or abilities.

587

As Mayor, I realized we needed to get educational tools to Marion residents, especially after Moller Tech announced that it would be locating in Bibb County, adjacent to Perry County, and bringing 222 jobs with it. But with a small town like Marion (population 3,432) not having a dedicated resource center, we didn’t quite know how to unite the two. Then one day, I attended a Central AlabamaWorks meeting and saw AIDT’s mobile unit, which is the Department of Commerce’s skills education center on wheels.

I spoke with Mikki Ruttan, director of Central AlabamaWorks, after the meeting and asked her about the possibility of getting the unit to our area. I learned it could be customized for the needs of its audience. After numerous discussions with other local leaders, we selected basic resume building and a Ready-to-Work course as the initial offerings. I knew the mobile unit would be key in obtaining career readiness for the citizens of Marion. I also felt that our citizens would welcome the chance to improve their skills and knowledge base.

After dozens of conversations, we got the mobile unit scheduled this past April. We posted and delivered flyers all over the city, announcing when and where the unit would be located, and we created a Facebook page. We had no idea what kind of response we would have for this type of educational opportunity. But, our citizens realized how such training could give them a leg up in the job market. As a result, they turned out in droves to learn more and better position themselves for entry into the job market, or to simply upgrade their skill set.

With Gov. Kay Ivey’s Success Plus initiative rollout a few months ago, I knew we had to get our citizens more training to help them, and our state, reach the goal of 500,000 people with post-high-school credentials by 2025. The mobile training unit seemed like the perfect way to deliver those opportunities to our residents.

After some discussion, we were able to get the unit at The Lincoln School. We focused the training on Ready-to-Work. The classes filled immediately, and a waiting list soon formed. Our people were eager to gain knowledge to improve their lives and that of their families. Once they completed the course, they received credentials as an Alabama Certified Worker; a Career Readiness certificate; a free three-credit-hour course at Wallace Community College Selma (if they had a high school diploma); three credits toward a high school diploma (if they didn’t have one); and a referral to the Selma Career Center for free certificates or degree information from WCC in welding, industrial maintenance, electrical technology or nursing.

The unit has been so popular with our citizens that two classrooms are now being refurbished at The Lincoln School specifically for AIDT courses. This means we will have a permanent place for our people to get not only Ready-to-Work training, but also training in other much-needed professions offered by Wallace, such as cosmetology, carpentry, welding, automotive technician and others.

The excitement continues to build for our city. In fact, AIDT has already completed one Ready-to-Work training with several graduates who have received employment.

With the extra effort by Central AlabamaWorks, AIDT, the Career Centers and the Alabama Community College System – combined with the excitement and work ethic of our citizens – I know Marionites can and will be a valued part of the Success Plus endeavor. I look forward to seeing what our citizens can achieve for themselves, their families and our community.

Marion Mayor uses tools to prep residents for AlabamaWorks Success Plus Initiative

(Contributed)

By: Dexter Hinton, Mayor of Marion, Alabama

When I was elected in late 2016 as Mayor of Marion, I knew there were certain areas in which our town needed to improve. One was education and work preparedness for those who did not want to attend a four-year college. We had gaps that needed to be filled.

As an Industrial Maintenance and Robotics Instructor at the Career Center in Greene County, I know what resources are available to assist those seeking a job or a skills education. When people come to the center, our team has a plethora of tests, assessments, job listings, resume-building sessions and other items at our disposal to help folks get the right position or training that matches their needs or abilities.

587

As Mayor, I realized we needed to get educational tools to Marion residents, especially after Moller Tech announced that it would be locating in Bibb County, adjacent to Perry County, and bringing 222 jobs with it. But with a small town like Marion (population 3,432) not having a dedicated resource center, we didn’t quite know how to unite the two. Then one day, I attended a Central AlabamaWorks meeting and saw AIDT’s mobile unit, which is the Department of Commerce’s skills education center on wheels.

I spoke with Mikki Ruttan, director of Central AlabamaWorks, after the meeting and asked her about the possibility of getting the unit to our area. I learned it could be customized for the needs of its audience. After numerous discussions with other local leaders, we selected basic resume building and a Ready-to-Work course as the initial offerings. I knew the mobile unit would be key in obtaining career readiness for the citizens of Marion. I also felt that our citizens would welcome the chance to improve their skills and knowledge base.

After dozens of conversations, we got the mobile unit scheduled this past April. We posted and delivered flyers all over the city, announcing when and where the unit would be located, and we created a Facebook page. We had no idea what kind of response we would have for this type of educational opportunity. But, our citizens realized how such training could give them a leg up in the job market. As a result, they turned out in droves to learn more and better position themselves for entry into the job market, or to simply upgrade their skill set.

With Gov. Kay Ivey’s Success Plus initiative rollout a few months ago, I knew we had to get our citizens more training to help them, and our state, reach the goal of 500,000 people with post-high-school credentials by 2025. The mobile training unit seemed like the perfect way to deliver those opportunities to our residents.

After some discussion, we were able to get the unit at The Lincoln School. We focused the training on Ready-to-Work. The classes filled immediately, and a waiting list soon formed. Our people were eager to gain knowledge to improve their lives and that of their families. Once they completed the course, they received credentials as an Alabama Certified Worker; a Career Readiness certificate; a free three-credit-hour course at Wallace Community College Selma (if they had a high school diploma); three credits toward a high school diploma (if they didn’t have one); and a referral to the Selma Career Center for free certificates or degree information from WCC in welding, industrial maintenance, electrical technology or nursing.

The unit has been so popular with our citizens that two classrooms are now being refurbished at The Lincoln School specifically for AIDT courses. This means we will have a permanent place for our people to get not only Ready-to-Work training, but also training in other much-needed professions offered by Wallace, such as cosmetology, carpentry, welding, automotive technician and others.

The excitement continues to build for our city. In fact, AIDT has already completed one Ready-to-Work training with several graduates who have received employment.

With the extra effort by Central AlabamaWorks, AIDT, the Career Centers and the Alabama Community College System – combined with the excitement and work ethic of our citizens – I know Marionites can and will be a valued part of the Success Plus endeavor. I look forward to seeing what our citizens can achieve for themselves, their families and our community.

Marion Mayor uses tools to prep residents for AlabamaWorks Success Plus Initiative

(Contributed)

By: Dexter Hinton, Mayor of Marion, Alabama

When I was elected in late 2016 as Mayor of Marion, I knew there were certain areas in which our town needed to improve. One was education and work preparedness for those who did not want to attend a four-year college. We had gaps that needed to be filled.

As an Industrial Maintenance and Robotics Instructor at the Career Center in Greene County, I know what resources are available to assist those seeking a job or a skills education. When people come to the center, our team has a plethora of tests, assessments, job listings, resume-building sessions and other items at our disposal to help folks get the right position or training that matches their needs or abilities.

587

As Mayor, I realized we needed to get educational tools to Marion residents, especially after Moller Tech announced that it would be locating in Bibb County, adjacent to Perry County, and bringing 222 jobs with it. But with a small town like Marion (population 3,432) not having a dedicated resource center, we didn’t quite know how to unite the two. Then one day, I attended a Central AlabamaWorks meeting and saw AIDT’s mobile unit, which is the Department of Commerce’s skills education center on wheels.

I spoke with Mikki Ruttan, director of Central AlabamaWorks, after the meeting and asked her about the possibility of getting the unit to our area. I learned it could be customized for the needs of its audience. After numerous discussions with other local leaders, we selected basic resume building and a Ready-to-Work course as the initial offerings. I knew the mobile unit would be key in obtaining career readiness for the citizens of Marion. I also felt that our citizens would welcome the chance to improve their skills and knowledge base.

After dozens of conversations, we got the mobile unit scheduled this past April. We posted and delivered flyers all over the city, announcing when and where the unit would be located, and we created a Facebook page. We had no idea what kind of response we would have for this type of educational opportunity. But, our citizens realized how such training could give them a leg up in the job market. As a result, they turned out in droves to learn more and better position themselves for entry into the job market, or to simply upgrade their skill set.

With Gov. Kay Ivey’s Success Plus initiative rollout a few months ago, I knew we had to get our citizens more training to help them, and our state, reach the goal of 500,000 people with post-high-school credentials by 2025. The mobile training unit seemed like the perfect way to deliver those opportunities to our residents.

After some discussion, we were able to get the unit at The Lincoln School. We focused the training on Ready-to-Work. The classes filled immediately, and a waiting list soon formed. Our people were eager to gain knowledge to improve their lives and that of their families. Once they completed the course, they received credentials as an Alabama Certified Worker; a Career Readiness certificate; a free three-credit-hour course at Wallace Community College Selma (if they had a high school diploma); three credits toward a high school diploma (if they didn’t have one); and a referral to the Selma Career Center for free certificates or degree information from WCC in welding, industrial maintenance, electrical technology or nursing.

The unit has been so popular with our citizens that two classrooms are now being refurbished at The Lincoln School specifically for AIDT courses. This means we will have a permanent place for our people to get not only Ready-to-Work training, but also training in other much-needed professions offered by Wallace, such as cosmetology, carpentry, welding, automotive technician and others.

The excitement continues to build for our city. In fact, AIDT has already completed one Ready-to-Work training with several graduates who have received employment.

With the extra effort by Central AlabamaWorks, AIDT, the Career Centers and the Alabama Community College System – combined with the excitement and work ethic of our citizens – I know Marionites can and will be a valued part of the Success Plus endeavor. I look forward to seeing what our citizens can achieve for themselves, their families and our community.

Serquest super-charges charitable giving

(Serquest)

An Alabama nonprofit is revolutionizing the way charitable organizations operate, and how volunteers can help them.

Serquest is the brainchild of Henry Hammond Cobb IV of Montgomery, who envisioned a web-based solution that would bring nonprofits into the 21st century.

“The idea for Serquest is, how do we create a product for all nonprofits to help them communicate better and help them travel on the interstate highways rather than bumpy dirt roads?” said Cobb. “There are a lot of nonprofits who help people. There’s not a lot of nonprofits who help the people that help people. We feel like that’s our responsibility.”

152

What exactly does Serquest do? Pretty much everything. For nonprofits, the web-based product allows groups to promote fundraisers, recruit volunteers and raise money. They can also get endorsements from other organizations, increase visibility and much more.

For individuals looking to help, the site allows visitors to browse thousands of volunteer opportunities in their community, donate items and give financial support with no platform fees. With their interactive dashboard and philanthropic resume, you can track your support, share activity with other users and share on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Cobb’s team has developed an expertise getting nonprofits noticed online by their targeted audiences. They can create promotional videos for organizations, market via social media and generate millions of views.

The power and reach of internet-based services has made our lives incredibly more convenient and well-informed. Thanks to Serquest, there is no excuse to put off giving time or money to the causes that matter to you.

Serquest super-charges charitable giving

(Serquest)

An Alabama nonprofit is revolutionizing the way charitable organizations operate, and how volunteers can help them.

Serquest is the brainchild of Henry Hammond Cobb IV of Montgomery, who envisioned a web-based solution that would bring nonprofits into the 21st century.

“The idea for Serquest is, how do we create a product for all nonprofits to help them communicate better and help them travel on the interstate highways rather than bumpy dirt roads?” said Cobb. “There are a lot of nonprofits who help people. There’s not a lot of nonprofits who help the people that help people. We feel like that’s our responsibility.”

152

What exactly does Serquest do? Pretty much everything. For nonprofits, the web-based product allows groups to promote fundraisers, recruit volunteers and raise money. They can also get endorsements from other organizations, increase visibility and much more.

For individuals looking to help, the site allows visitors to browse thousands of volunteer opportunities in their community, donate items and give financial support with no platform fees. With their interactive dashboard and philanthropic resume, you can track your support, share activity with other users and share on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Cobb’s team has developed an expertise getting nonprofits noticed online by their targeted audiences. They can create promotional videos for organizations, market via social media and generate millions of views.

The power and reach of internet-based services has made our lives incredibly more convenient and well-informed. Thanks to Serquest, there is no excuse to put off giving time or money to the causes that matter to you.

Serquest super-charges charitable giving

(Serquest)

An Alabama nonprofit is revolutionizing the way charitable organizations operate, and how volunteers can help them.

Serquest is the brainchild of Henry Hammond Cobb IV of Montgomery, who envisioned a web-based solution that would bring nonprofits into the 21st century.

“The idea for Serquest is, how do we create a product for all nonprofits to help them communicate better and help them travel on the interstate highways rather than bumpy dirt roads?” said Cobb. “There are a lot of nonprofits who help people. There’s not a lot of nonprofits who help the people that help people. We feel like that’s our responsibility.”

152

What exactly does Serquest do? Pretty much everything. For nonprofits, the web-based product allows groups to promote fundraisers, recruit volunteers and raise money. They can also get endorsements from other organizations, increase visibility and much more.

For individuals looking to help, the site allows visitors to browse thousands of volunteer opportunities in their community, donate items and give financial support with no platform fees. With their interactive dashboard and philanthropic resume, you can track your support, share activity with other users and share on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Cobb’s team has developed an expertise getting nonprofits noticed online by their targeted audiences. They can create promotional videos for organizations, market via social media and generate millions of views.

The power and reach of internet-based services has made our lives incredibly more convenient and well-informed. Thanks to Serquest, there is no excuse to put off giving time or money to the causes that matter to you.

Alexander Shunnarah wants his law firm to be known for reaching into the community

The Alexander Shunnarah “Shark of The Week” Ronnie Rice joined Yellowhammer’s The Ford Faction to talk about what’s new at the law firm. Ronnie discusses his opportunity to speak with the University of Alabama football team and what that meant to him to get that message across.  In the interview, Ronnie even gave hints about Alex joining the #InMyFeelingsChallenge.

In another great segment, Ronnie delivers a fantastic interview in Today’s Alexander Shunnarah “Shark of The Week.”

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Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Presents The Ford Faction podcast on iTunes or Stitcher or listen live each weekday from 12pm to 3pm on Birmingham and Huntsville’s 101.1 FM.

Serquest super-charges charitable giving

(Serquest)

An Alabama nonprofit is revolutionizing the way charitable organizations operate, and how volunteers can help them.

Serquest is the brainchild of Henry Hammond Cobb IV of Montgomery, who envisioned a web-based solution that would bring nonprofits into the 21st century.

“The idea for Serquest is, how do we create a product for all nonprofits to help them communicate better and help them travel on the interstate highways rather than bumpy dirt roads?” said Cobb. “There are a lot of nonprofits who help people. There’s not a lot of nonprofits who help the people that help people. We feel like that’s our responsibility.”

152

What exactly does Serquest do? Pretty much everything. For nonprofits, the web-based product allows groups to promote fundraisers, recruit volunteers and raise money. They can also get endorsements from other organizations, increase visibility and much more.

For individuals looking to help, the site allows visitors to browse thousands of volunteer opportunities in their community, donate items and give financial support with no platform fees. With their interactive dashboard and philanthropic resume, you can track your support, share activity with other users and share on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Cobb’s team has developed an expertise getting nonprofits noticed online by their targeted audiences. They can create promotional videos for organizations, market via social media and generate millions of views.

The power and reach of internet-based services has made our lives incredibly more convenient and well-informed. Thanks to Serquest, there is no excuse to put off giving time or money to the causes that matter to you.

Serquest super-charges charitable giving

(Serquest)

An Alabama nonprofit is revolutionizing the way charitable organizations operate, and how volunteers can help them.

Serquest is the brainchild of Henry Hammond Cobb IV of Montgomery, who envisioned a web-based solution that would bring nonprofits into the 21st century.

“The idea for Serquest is, how do we create a product for all nonprofits to help them communicate better and help them travel on the interstate highways rather than bumpy dirt roads?” said Cobb. “There are a lot of nonprofits who help people. There’s not a lot of nonprofits who help the people that help people. We feel like that’s our responsibility.”

152

What exactly does Serquest do? Pretty much everything. For nonprofits, the web-based product allows groups to promote fundraisers, recruit volunteers and raise money. They can also get endorsements from other organizations, increase visibility and much more.

For individuals looking to help, the site allows visitors to browse thousands of volunteer opportunities in their community, donate items and give financial support with no platform fees. With their interactive dashboard and philanthropic resume, you can track your support, share activity with other users and share on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Cobb’s team has developed an expertise getting nonprofits noticed online by their targeted audiences. They can create promotional videos for organizations, market via social media and generate millions of views.

The power and reach of internet-based services has made our lives incredibly more convenient and well-informed. Thanks to Serquest, there is no excuse to put off giving time or money to the causes that matter to you.

Who is building Alabama’s next workforce? AlabamaWorks! is.

(AlabamaWorks!/Facebook)

Mike Ruttan of Central AlabamaWorks! Joined The Ford Faction to talk about what’s been going on recently with AlabamaWorks! The initiative they have is to “Develop strategic alliances by building and expanding effective industry partnerships.”  The Career Expo for 8th Graders will be held on Sept. 13 and 14 at Southern Union in Opelika.

16

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Presents The Ford Faction podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

Listen to the craziest case Jonathan Cooner has ever worked…. WOW

(Alexander Shunnarah)

Alexander Shunnarah “Shark of The Week”, Jonathan Cooner came to the studio with some great stories. Jonathan started it off by talking about his time with the law firm and the number of phone calls they get and how he started off. Jonathan told the guys a story about “A toddler and a mechanical bull.”  Jonathan went into depth about what it means to be a member of the Shunnarah Law Firm and even gave his wife and daughter a shoutout.

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Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Presents The Ford Faction podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

Groups, initiatives align under AlabamaWorks! Success Plus

(AlabamaWorks!)

Alabama is moving quickly in developing a trained workforce that meets the needs of business, with major changes in recent years in how our workforce development system operates.

The process began four years ago when the Alabama Workforce Council recommended a re-alignment of our workforce programs. The Alabama Legislature responded by passing legislation to make the changes possible, and Gov. Kay Ivey, then lieutenant governor, fully supported these measures. Today, Alabama’s workforce landscape is strikingly different.

One of the Alabama Workforce Council’s recommendations was to reorganize the state’s 10 workforce regions into seven. The Legislature approved funding for staff to run these councils, and these regional workforce directors work closely with the business community as well as the Alabama Department of Commerce, Alabama Community College System, K-12, the Alabama Department of Labor, the Career Center System and other related agencies, to identify and meet the needs of industry and workers. In addition, Commerce and the ACCS have assigned liaisons who link each region to workforce training and other resources.

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The legislature also required that at least 75 percent of the voting members come from the business community within each region. This raises the level of engagement with Alabama businesses.

Another significant change in the streamlining of workforce development was the realignment of the Workforce Innovations Opportunity Act program. The three local WIOA boards were expanded to seven and aligned with the seven workforce areas. Many business leaders from around the state were appointed to the state’s WIOA board and, in some areas, to the local boards. Again, this change has resulted in a more even approach to WIOA funding and a significant increase in business engagement across the state.

In 2016, the Legislature approved the creation of Apprenticeship Alabama, designed to increase the number of apprentices to assist companies in building their pipeline of workers.
In its first year, 2017, Apprenticeship Alabama significantly increased the number of apprentices statewide. And while the modest tax credit was a new benefit to companies, the fact that there was an office dedicated to helping businesses register their programs with the U.S. Department of Labor enabled the program to grow. Navigating the waters of federal registration can be tedious, but the Apprenticeship Alabama staff, along with the regional councils, are dedicated to assisting companies with the expansion of this training program.

At first glance, the various components of workforce development appear to be separate entities with separate goals. When you look closer, however, they form the backbone of Gov. Ivey’s recently announced AlabamaWorks Success Plus initiative.

The Success Plus education attainment initiative is the cornerstone of the governor’s “Strong Start. Strong Finish” endeavor. Ivey announced that by 2025, Alabama MUST have 500,000 additional workers who have more than a high school diploma.

Many high schools and career technical programs offer students credentials that qualify within Success Plus. Some students involved in dual-enrollment programs with the ACCS receive not only a high school diploma, but an associate degree or certificate.

Without doubt, one of the most important factors in the development of Alabama’s workforce system has the foresight and the wok of the Alabama Workforce Council, a business-led advisory group for the governor, the Legislature and agency heads. Under the Chairmanship of Zeke Smith, from Alabama Power, the council has provided the sounding board needed by among business and state leaders and the vehicle for candid discussions about workforce development initiatives. The importance of the AWC cannot be understated.

Finally, workforce development in this state would not be complete without the work of AIDT. AIDT is Alabama’s workforce training incentive program. It assists both existing businesses in expansion and new businesses moving to the state. AIDT is consistently ranked in the top three training incentive programs in the country, and we are extremely proud of our ranking. Day in and day out, AIDT staff are boots on the ground assisting more than 130 projects across the state helping fill thousands of jobs.

Of course, the best entry point to any job-seekers is the 50-plus Alabama Career Centers located strategically across Alabama, managed by the Alabama Department of Labor.

When you build a team, the goal is to be the best. This involves uniting team members who are good at a particular position. On their own, they may not make a significant impact. But working as a unit, they perform like a well-oiled machine. During the past four years, we’ve been putting this team together, and we’re seeing the fruits of our labor.

Why does this matter to you? Simply said, these changes, these new initiatives, program improvements and alignments will keep Alabama in the game for new industry and jobs. We must have an educated and skilled workforce for our businesses in the world to come.

For more information about these and other programs within Alabama’s education and workforce infrastructure, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Ed Castile is deputy secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce and director of AIDT.

Groups, initiatives align under AlabamaWorks! Success Plus

(AlabamaWorks!)

Alabama is moving quickly in developing a trained workforce that meets the needs of business, with major changes in recent years in how our workforce development system operates.

The process began four years ago when the Alabama Workforce Council recommended a re-alignment of our workforce programs. The Alabama Legislature responded by passing legislation to make the changes possible, and Gov. Kay Ivey, then lieutenant governor, fully supported these measures. Today, Alabama’s workforce landscape is strikingly different.

One of the Alabama Workforce Council’s recommendations was to reorganize the state’s 10 workforce regions into seven. The Legislature approved funding for staff to run these councils, and these regional workforce directors work closely with the business community as well as the Alabama Department of Commerce, Alabama Community College System, K-12, the Alabama Department of Labor, the Career Center System and other related agencies, to identify and meet the needs of industry and workers. In addition, Commerce and the ACCS have assigned liaisons who link each region to workforce training and other resources.

641

The legislature also required that at least 75 percent of the voting members come from the business community within each region. This raises the level of engagement with Alabama businesses.

Another significant change in the streamlining of workforce development was the realignment of the Workforce Innovations Opportunity Act program. The three local WIOA boards were expanded to seven and aligned with the seven workforce areas. Many business leaders from around the state were appointed to the state’s WIOA board and, in some areas, to the local boards. Again, this change has resulted in a more even approach to WIOA funding and a significant increase in business engagement across the state.

In 2016, the Legislature approved the creation of Apprenticeship Alabama, designed to increase the number of apprentices to assist companies in building their pipeline of workers.
In its first year, 2017, Apprenticeship Alabama significantly increased the number of apprentices statewide. And while the modest tax credit was a new benefit to companies, the fact that there was an office dedicated to helping businesses register their programs with the U.S. Department of Labor enabled the program to grow. Navigating the waters of federal registration can be tedious, but the Apprenticeship Alabama staff, along with the regional councils, are dedicated to assisting companies with the expansion of this training program.

At first glance, the various components of workforce development appear to be separate entities with separate goals. When you look closer, however, they form the backbone of Gov. Ivey’s recently announced AlabamaWorks Success Plus initiative.

The Success Plus education attainment initiative is the cornerstone of the governor’s “Strong Start. Strong Finish” endeavor. Ivey announced that by 2025, Alabama MUST have 500,000 additional workers who have more than a high school diploma.

Many high schools and career technical programs offer students credentials that qualify within Success Plus. Some students involved in dual-enrollment programs with the ACCS receive not only a high school diploma, but an associate degree or certificate.

Without doubt, one of the most important factors in the development of Alabama’s workforce system has the foresight and the wok of the Alabama Workforce Council, a business-led advisory group for the governor, the Legislature and agency heads. Under the Chairmanship of Zeke Smith, from Alabama Power, the council has provided the sounding board needed by among business and state leaders and the vehicle for candid discussions about workforce development initiatives. The importance of the AWC cannot be understated.

Finally, workforce development in this state would not be complete without the work of AIDT. AIDT is Alabama’s workforce training incentive program. It assists both existing businesses in expansion and new businesses moving to the state. AIDT is consistently ranked in the top three training incentive programs in the country, and we are extremely proud of our ranking. Day in and day out, AIDT staff are boots on the ground assisting more than 130 projects across the state helping fill thousands of jobs.

Of course, the best entry point to any job-seekers is the 50-plus Alabama Career Centers located strategically across Alabama, managed by the Alabama Department of Labor.

When you build a team, the goal is to be the best. This involves uniting team members who are good at a particular position. On their own, they may not make a significant impact. But working as a unit, they perform like a well-oiled machine. During the past four years, we’ve been putting this team together, and we’re seeing the fruits of our labor.

Why does this matter to you? Simply said, these changes, these new initiatives, program improvements and alignments will keep Alabama in the game for new industry and jobs. We must have an educated and skilled workforce for our businesses in the world to come.

For more information about these and other programs within Alabama’s education and workforce infrastructure, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Ed Castile is deputy secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce and director of AIDT.

Fighting violent crime is a hallmark issue for Attorney General Steve Marshall

(Marshall Campaign)

Steve Marshall remains unwavering in fighting violent crime and safeguarding the people of Alabama. Last year, Marshall launched the “Initiative on Violent Crime” from the Attorney General’s Office, which focuses on reclaiming, restoring and reviving Alabama communities.

“I am determined to reclaim our neighborhoods from the scourge of violent crime, restore the rule of law, and ultimately, see these communities revived. We are accomplishing these goals through targeting our worst-hit areas, establishing strategic partnerships with federal, state, and local law enforcement, renewing investments in crime-fighting resources and increasing training opportunities for those on the front lines.”

“We are also listening to the needs of victims of violent crime. As a result, we advocated for and secured the historic passage of the Fair Justice Act to ensure that capital murderers are limited in their ability to file endless frivolous appeals that cause families to relive their horror again and again, while losing faith in the justice system.”

139

Over the past twelve months, violent crime has dropped by 15% in Montgomery alone. Marshall’s proven commitment to fight violent crime has the potential to positively impact the lives of Alabamians for generations to come. As Marshall said after 11 violent offenders were captured with the assistance of his office, “criminals should be on notice—we will not tolerate this menace to our citizens.”

Steve Marshall is a voice for the most vulnerable, standing up for the rights and protection of victims. He is tough on crime and works diligently every day to see that justice is served in our state. He is committed to standing up for what is right and will always put the well being of Alabama first. With Steve Marshall in office, Alabama is safer.

(Paid for by Steve Marshall for Alabama, P.O. Box 3537, Montgomery, AL 36109)

Alexander Shunnarah wants his law firm to be known for reaching into the community

Alexander Shunnarah’s Shark of The Week, Ronnie Rice, was able to make a visit to the studio to talk about the 4th of July and his vacation even though Alex stayed and worked all week. Ronnie went into depth about the law firm’s outreach to the community and giving back to the city. Ronnie even mentioned his plans on “Slossfest” the Birmingham music festival.

16

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Presents The Ford Faction podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

Groups, initiatives align under AlabamaWorks! Success Plus

(AlabamaWorks!)

Alabama is moving quickly in developing a trained workforce that meets the needs of business, with major changes in recent years in how our workforce development system operates.

The process began four years ago when the Alabama Workforce Council recommended a re-alignment of our workforce programs. The Alabama Legislature responded by passing legislation to make the changes possible, and Gov. Kay Ivey, then lieutenant governor, fully supported these measures. Today, Alabama’s workforce landscape is strikingly different.

One of the Alabama Workforce Council’s recommendations was to reorganize the state’s 10 workforce regions into seven. The Legislature approved funding for staff to run these councils, and these regional workforce directors work closely with the business community as well as the Alabama Department of Commerce, Alabama Community College System, K-12, the Alabama Department of Labor, the Career Center System and other related agencies, to identify and meet the needs of industry and workers. In addition, Commerce and the ACCS have assigned liaisons who link each region to workforce training and other resources.

641

The legislature also required that at least 75 percent of the voting members come from the business community within each region. This raises the level of engagement with Alabama businesses.

Another significant change in the streamlining of workforce development was the realignment of the Workforce Innovations Opportunity Act program. The three local WIOA boards were expanded to seven and aligned with the seven workforce areas. Many business leaders from around the state were appointed to the state’s WIOA board and, in some areas, to the local boards. Again, this change has resulted in a more even approach to WIOA funding and a significant increase in business engagement across the state.

In 2016, the Legislature approved the creation of Apprenticeship Alabama, designed to increase the number of apprentices to assist companies in building their pipeline of workers.
In its first year, 2017, Apprenticeship Alabama significantly increased the number of apprentices statewide. And while the modest tax credit was a new benefit to companies, the fact that there was an office dedicated to helping businesses register their programs with the U.S. Department of Labor enabled the program to grow. Navigating the waters of federal registration can be tedious, but the Apprenticeship Alabama staff, along with the regional councils, are dedicated to assisting companies with the expansion of this training program.

At first glance, the various components of workforce development appear to be separate entities with separate goals. When you look closer, however, they form the backbone of Gov. Ivey’s recently announced AlabamaWorks Success Plus initiative.

The Success Plus education attainment initiative is the cornerstone of the governor’s “Strong Start. Strong Finish” endeavor. Ivey announced that by 2025, Alabama MUST have 500,000 additional workers who have more than a high school diploma.

Many high schools and career technical programs offer students credentials that qualify within Success Plus. Some students involved in dual-enrollment programs with the ACCS receive not only a high school diploma, but an associate degree or certificate.

Without doubt, one of the most important factors in the development of Alabama’s workforce system has the foresight and the wok of the Alabama Workforce Council, a business-led advisory group for the governor, the Legislature and agency heads. Under the Chairmanship of Zeke Smith, from Alabama Power, the council has provided the sounding board needed by among business and state leaders and the vehicle for candid discussions about workforce development initiatives. The importance of the AWC cannot be understated.

Finally, workforce development in this state would not be complete without the work of AIDT. AIDT is Alabama’s workforce training incentive program. It assists both existing businesses in expansion and new businesses moving to the state. AIDT is consistently ranked in the top three training incentive programs in the country, and we are extremely proud of our ranking. Day in and day out, AIDT staff are boots on the ground assisting more than 130 projects across the state helping fill thousands of jobs.

Of course, the best entry point to any job-seekers is the 50-plus Alabama Career Centers located strategically across Alabama, managed by the Alabama Department of Labor.

When you build a team, the goal is to be the best. This involves uniting team members who are good at a particular position. On their own, they may not make a significant impact. But working as a unit, they perform like a well-oiled machine. During the past four years, we’ve been putting this team together, and we’re seeing the fruits of our labor.

Why does this matter to you? Simply said, these changes, these new initiatives, program improvements and alignments will keep Alabama in the game for new industry and jobs. We must have an educated and skilled workforce for our businesses in the world to come.

For more information about these and other programs within Alabama’s education and workforce infrastructure, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Ed Castile is deputy secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce and director of AIDT.

Fighting violent crime is a hallmark issue for Attorney General Steve Marshall

(Marshall Campaign)

Steve Marshall remains unwavering in fighting violent crime and safeguarding the people of Alabama. Last year, Marshall launched the “Initiative on Violent Crime” from the Attorney General’s Office, which focuses on reclaiming, restoring and reviving Alabama communities.

“I am determined to reclaim our neighborhoods from the scourge of violent crime, restore the rule of law, and ultimately, see these communities revived. We are accomplishing these goals through targeting our worst-hit areas, establishing strategic partnerships with federal, state, and local law enforcement, renewing investments in crime-fighting resources and increasing training opportunities for those on the front lines.”

“We are also listening to the needs of victims of violent crime. As a result, we advocated for and secured the historic passage of the Fair Justice Act to ensure that capital murderers are limited in their ability to file endless frivolous appeals that cause families to relive their horror again and again, while losing faith in the justice system.”

139

Over the past twelve months, violent crime has dropped by 15% in Montgomery alone. Marshall’s proven commitment to fight violent crime has the potential to positively impact the lives of Alabamians for generations to come. As Marshall said after 11 violent offenders were captured with the assistance of his office, “criminals should be on notice—we will not tolerate this menace to our citizens.”

Steve Marshall is a voice for the most vulnerable, standing up for the rights and protection of victims. He is tough on crime and works diligently every day to see that justice is served in our state. He is committed to standing up for what is right and will always put the well being of Alabama first. With Steve Marshall in office, Alabama is safer.

(Paid for by Steve Marshall for Alabama, P.O. Box 3537, Montgomery, AL 36109)

1 month ago

Sloss Tech can be launching point to find your entrepreneurial passion

INFLCR founder and CEO Jim Cavale, left, will open Sloss Tech 2018 with a conversation with Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin. The event, bringing elite entrepreneurs and technology leaders together in Birmingham, is set for Friday, July 13.

Jim Cavale was sitting in the audience at a tech conference in Birmingham, Ala., in 2016. At the time, he was president of a successful fitness company in the city that had grown into a national brand, but his mind was beginning to think about new challenges.

That inaugural Sloss Tech conference, in 2016, was a game-changer for Cavale. As he listened to keynote speaker Gary Vaynerchuk, the wheels began to turn.

“I was very comfortable and very passionate about what I was doing at Iron Tribe Fitness,” Cavale recalls. “Gary’s talk stirred a lot of passions that are embedded inside of me. He talked about the importance of personal brand and social media and how important it is in terms of athletes. He talked about leveraging the platforms to accomplish your goals in business and in life.

“He talked about things that led to a conversation between him and me afterward, that really kept stirring in me after the event was over. Less than two months after that event, I ended up deciding that it was a good time to sell out to my partners and I found myself in New York in Gary’s office telling him the story of the impact his talk had on me. I knew that I was going to build something new in this sports/social media realm. I didn’t know what it would be, whether it was going to be consulting and services or technology-based.”



That idea became
Influencer (INFLCR), which launched in late 2017 and now works with some of the biggest brands in college sports and politics. The INFLCR software allowing clients to store, distribute and track their digital assets — photos, videos, story links, GIFs and more — through a cloud-based INFLCR account as they flow through the social accounts of their brand ambassadors.

514

“INFLCR allows you to partner with your brand ambassadors to tell their story within the context of yours,” Cavale says. “INFLCR has grown to serve a lot of big-time clients in the college sports world, and now in the political world. We are a product, but we have services built around it, and we help brands partner with their brand ambassadors on social media to create a full-circle influencer marketing network that the content runs through. Sloss Tech was a spark for that.”

On Friday, Cavale will come full circle. He’s the opening speaker for Sloss Tech 2018, featuring an all-star lineup of tech entrepreneurs and leaders such as Endeavor’s Bozoma “Boz” Saint John, director Payne Lindsey, Google’s Charles Berg and Foundry Group partner Chris Moody.

As part of his opening, Cavale will interview Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin about the burgeoning tech ecosystem that is a big part of Birmingham’s renaissance. While he was exiting Iron Tribe and making plans to launch INFLCR, Cavale came to know Woodfin as the candidate was on his way to becoming Birmingham’s youngest mayor since 1893. They’ll discuss Woodfin’s vision for capitalizing on the rising tide of technology in the heart of the Magic City. Birmingham-based companies such as Shipt and Fleetio are scoring big wins, among the many success stories being celebrated as part of Birmingham’s Innovation Week.

INFLCR, of course, hopes to become a big part of that story.

“For me, it’s cool to come back two years later for to the third Sloss Tech event, and to open it up by telling this story and challenge some in the audience to think about what they might learn that might spark something in them,” Cavale says. “And for us at INFLCR, this is a great event for us to host potential new hires and talent and bring in prospective new clients. There will be people attending the event from states all over the Southeast.”


Of course, after all this learning, networking and innovation, there will be entertainment.

Said Cavale: “It goes right from Sloss Tech to Sloss Fest, which has become one of the nation’s premier music festivals with almost 100,000 people coming through Birmingham for acts like Chris Stapleton and 21 Savage.”

It’s a great time to be in the Magic City. Perhaps you, too, may hear or meet someone who helps you see new possibilities as Cavale did in the audience in 2016.

Fighting violent crime is a hallmark issue for Attorney General Steve Marshall

(Marshall Campaign)

Steve Marshall remains unwavering in fighting violent crime and safeguarding the people of Alabama. Last year, Marshall launched the “Initiative on Violent Crime” from the Attorney General’s Office, which focuses on reclaiming, restoring and reviving Alabama communities.

“I am determined to reclaim our neighborhoods from the scourge of violent crime, restore the rule of law, and ultimately, see these communities revived. We are accomplishing these goals through targeting our worst-hit areas, establishing strategic partnerships with federal, state, and local law enforcement, renewing investments in crime-fighting resources and increasing training opportunities for those on the front lines.”

“We are also listening to the needs of victims of violent crime. As a result, we advocated for and secured the historic passage of the Fair Justice Act to ensure that capital murderers are limited in their ability to file endless frivolous appeals that cause families to relive their horror again and again, while losing faith in the justice system.”

139

Over the past twelve months, violent crime has dropped by 15% in Montgomery alone. Marshall’s proven commitment to fight violent crime has the potential to positively impact the lives of Alabamians for generations to come. As Marshall said after 11 violent offenders were captured with the assistance of his office, “criminals should be on notice—we will not tolerate this menace to our citizens.”

Steve Marshall is a voice for the most vulnerable, standing up for the rights and protection of victims. He is tough on crime and works diligently every day to see that justice is served in our state. He is committed to standing up for what is right and will always put the well being of Alabama first. With Steve Marshall in office, Alabama is safer.

(Paid for by Steve Marshall for Alabama, P.O. Box 3537, Montgomery, AL 36109)

Groups, initiatives align under AlabamaWorks! Success Plus

(AlabamaWorks!)

Alabama is moving quickly in developing a trained workforce that meets the needs of business, with major changes in recent years in how our workforce development system operates.

The process began four years ago when the Alabama Workforce Council recommended a re-alignment of our workforce programs. The Alabama Legislature responded by passing legislation to make the changes possible, and Gov. Kay Ivey, then lieutenant governor, fully supported these measures. Today, Alabama’s workforce landscape is strikingly different.

One of the Alabama Workforce Council’s recommendations was to reorganize the state’s 10 workforce regions into seven. The Legislature approved funding for staff to run these councils, and these regional workforce directors work closely with the business community as well as the Alabama Department of Commerce, Alabama Community College System, K-12, the Alabama Department of Labor, the Career Center System and other related agencies, to identify and meet the needs of industry and workers. In addition, Commerce and the ACCS have assigned liaisons who link each region to workforce training and other resources.

641

The legislature also required that at least 75 percent of the voting members come from the business community within each region. This raises the level of engagement with Alabama businesses.

Another significant change in the streamlining of workforce development was the realignment of the Workforce Innovations Opportunity Act program. The three local WIOA boards were expanded to seven and aligned with the seven workforce areas. Many business leaders from around the state were appointed to the state’s WIOA board and, in some areas, to the local boards. Again, this change has resulted in a more even approach to WIOA funding and a significant increase in business engagement across the state.

In 2016, the Legislature approved the creation of Apprenticeship Alabama, designed to increase the number of apprentices to assist companies in building their pipeline of workers.
In its first year, 2017, Apprenticeship Alabama significantly increased the number of apprentices statewide. And while the modest tax credit was a new benefit to companies, the fact that there was an office dedicated to helping businesses register their programs with the U.S. Department of Labor enabled the program to grow. Navigating the waters of federal registration can be tedious, but the Apprenticeship Alabama staff, along with the regional councils, are dedicated to assisting companies with the expansion of this training program.

At first glance, the various components of workforce development appear to be separate entities with separate goals. When you look closer, however, they form the backbone of Gov. Ivey’s recently announced AlabamaWorks Success Plus initiative.

The Success Plus education attainment initiative is the cornerstone of the governor’s “Strong Start. Strong Finish” endeavor. Ivey announced that by 2025, Alabama MUST have 500,000 additional workers who have more than a high school diploma.

Many high schools and career technical programs offer students credentials that qualify within Success Plus. Some students involved in dual-enrollment programs with the ACCS receive not only a high school diploma, but an associate degree or certificate.

Without doubt, one of the most important factors in the development of Alabama’s workforce system has the foresight and the wok of the Alabama Workforce Council, a business-led advisory group for the governor, the Legislature and agency heads. Under the Chairmanship of Zeke Smith, from Alabama Power, the council has provided the sounding board needed by among business and state leaders and the vehicle for candid discussions about workforce development initiatives. The importance of the AWC cannot be understated.

Finally, workforce development in this state would not be complete without the work of AIDT. AIDT is Alabama’s workforce training incentive program. It assists both existing businesses in expansion and new businesses moving to the state. AIDT is consistently ranked in the top three training incentive programs in the country, and we are extremely proud of our ranking. Day in and day out, AIDT staff are boots on the ground assisting more than 130 projects across the state helping fill thousands of jobs.

Of course, the best entry point to any job-seekers is the 50-plus Alabama Career Centers located strategically across Alabama, managed by the Alabama Department of Labor.

When you build a team, the goal is to be the best. This involves uniting team members who are good at a particular position. On their own, they may not make a significant impact. But working as a unit, they perform like a well-oiled machine. During the past four years, we’ve been putting this team together, and we’re seeing the fruits of our labor.

Why does this matter to you? Simply said, these changes, these new initiatives, program improvements and alignments will keep Alabama in the game for new industry and jobs. We must have an educated and skilled workforce for our businesses in the world to come.

For more information about these and other programs within Alabama’s education and workforce infrastructure, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Ed Castile is deputy secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce and director of AIDT.

Fighting violent crime is a hallmark issue for Attorney General Steve Marshall

(Marshall Campaign)

Steve Marshall remains unwavering in fighting violent crime and safeguarding the people of Alabama. Last year, Marshall launched the “Initiative on Violent Crime” from the Attorney General’s Office, which focuses on reclaiming, restoring and reviving Alabama communities.

“I am determined to reclaim our neighborhoods from the scourge of violent crime, restore the rule of law, and ultimately, see these communities revived. We are accomplishing these goals through targeting our worst-hit areas, establishing strategic partnerships with federal, state, and local law enforcement, renewing investments in crime-fighting resources and increasing training opportunities for those on the front lines.”

“We are also listening to the needs of victims of violent crime. As a result, we advocated for and secured the historic passage of the Fair Justice Act to ensure that capital murderers are limited in their ability to file endless frivolous appeals that cause families to relive their horror again and again, while losing faith in the justice system.”

139

Over the past twelve months, violent crime has dropped by 15% in Montgomery alone. Marshall’s proven commitment to fight violent crime has the potential to positively impact the lives of Alabamians for generations to come. As Marshall said after 11 violent offenders were captured with the assistance of his office, “criminals should be on notice—we will not tolerate this menace to our citizens.”

Steve Marshall is a voice for the most vulnerable, standing up for the rights and protection of victims. He is tough on crime and works diligently every day to see that justice is served in our state. He is committed to standing up for what is right and will always put the well being of Alabama first. With Steve Marshall in office, Alabama is safer.

(Paid for by Steve Marshall for Alabama, P.O. Box 3537, Montgomery, AL 36109)

Fighting violent crime is a hallmark issue for Attorney General Steve Marshall

(Marshall Campaign)

Steve Marshall remains unwavering in fighting violent crime and safeguarding the people of Alabama. Last year, Marshall launched the “Initiative on Violent Crime” from the Attorney General’s Office, which focuses on reclaiming, restoring and reviving Alabama communities.

“I am determined to reclaim our neighborhoods from the scourge of violent crime, restore the rule of law, and ultimately, see these communities revived. We are accomplishing these goals through targeting our worst-hit areas, establishing strategic partnerships with federal, state, and local law enforcement, renewing investments in crime-fighting resources and increasing training opportunities for those on the front lines.”

“We are also listening to the needs of victims of violent crime. As a result, we advocated for and secured the historic passage of the Fair Justice Act to ensure that capital murderers are limited in their ability to file endless frivolous appeals that cause families to relive their horror again and again, while losing faith in the justice system.”

139

Over the past twelve months, violent crime has dropped by 15% in Montgomery alone. Marshall’s proven commitment to fight violent crime has the potential to positively impact the lives of Alabamians for generations to come. As Marshall said after 11 violent offenders were captured with the assistance of his office, “criminals should be on notice—we will not tolerate this menace to our citizens.”

Steve Marshall is a voice for the most vulnerable, standing up for the rights and protection of victims. He is tough on crime and works diligently every day to see that justice is served in our state. He is committed to standing up for what is right and will always put the well being of Alabama first. With Steve Marshall in office, Alabama is safer.

(Paid for by Steve Marshall for Alabama, P.O. Box 3537, Montgomery, AL 36109)