The Wire

  • New tunnel, premium RV section at Talladega Superspeedway on schedule despite weather

    Excerpt:

    Construction of a new oversized vehicle tunnel and premium RV infield parking section at Talladega Superspeedway is still on schedule to be completed in time for the April NASCAR race, despite large amounts of rainfall and unusual groundwater conditions underneath the track.

    Track Chairman Grant Lynch, during a news conference Wednesday at the track, said he’s amazed the general contractor, Taylor Corporation of Oxford, has been able to keep the project on schedule.

    “The amount of water they have pumped out of that and the extra engineering they did from the original design, basically to keep that tunnel from floating up out of the earth, was remarkable,” Lynch said.

  • Alabama workers built 1.6M engines in 2018 to add auto horsepower

    Excerpt:

    Alabama’s auto workers built nearly 1.6 million engines last year, as the state industry continues to carve out a place in global markets with innovative, high-performance parts, systems and finished vehicles.

    Last year also saw major new developments in engine manufacturing among the state’s key players, and more advanced infrastructure is on the way in the coming year.

    Hyundai expects to complete a key addition to its engine operations in Montgomery during the first half of 2019, while Honda continues to reap the benefits of a cutting-edge Alabama engine line installed several years ago.

  • Groundbreaking on Alabama’s newest aerospace plant made possible through key partnerships

    Excerpt:

    Political and business leaders gathered for a groundbreaking at Alabama’s newest aerospace plant gave credit to the formation of the many key partnerships that made it possible.

    Governor Kay Ivey and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event which celebrated the construction of rocket engine builder Blue Origin’s facility in Huntsville.

How Alabamians can fulfill children’s dreams of a better education

(Pixabay, YHN)

There is still time this year to change the life of an Alabama student seeking a better education.

A contribution to one of the state’s Scholarship Granting Organizations will help fund the dreams of these deserving children who want nothing more than to attend a school where they can excel.

Make your contribution before December 31 and receive a dollar-for-dollar tax credit on up to 50% of your 2019 tax liability.

Learn about this incredible scholarship program and how to claim your tax credit.

1

How Alabamians can fulfill children’s dreams of a better education

(Pixabay, YHN)

There is still time this year to change the life of an Alabama student seeking a better education.

A contribution to one of the state’s Scholarship Granting Organizations will help fund the dreams of these deserving children who want nothing more than to attend a school where they can excel.

Make your contribution before December 31 and receive a dollar-for-dollar tax credit on up to 50% of your 2019 tax liability.

Learn about this incredible scholarship program and how to claim your tax credit.

1

How Alabamians can fulfill children’s dreams of a better education

(Pixabay, YHN)

There is still time this year to change the life of an Alabama student seeking a better education.

A contribution to one of the state’s Scholarship Granting Organizations will help fund the dreams of these deserving children who want nothing more than to attend a school where they can excel.

Make your contribution before December 31 and receive a dollar-for-dollar tax credit on up to 50% of your 2019 tax liability.

Learn about this incredible scholarship program and how to claim your tax credit.

1

How Alabamians can fulfill children’s dreams of a better education

(Pixabay, YHN)

There is still time this year to change the life of an Alabama student seeking a better education.

A contribution to one of the state’s Scholarship Granting Organizations will help fund the dreams of these deserving children who want nothing more than to attend a school where they can excel.

Make your contribution before December 31 and receive a dollar-for-dollar tax credit on up to 50% of your 2019 tax liability.

Learn about this incredible scholarship program and how to claim your tax credit.

1

Iron Tribe Fitness helps Alabamians get in shape with the 2020 28-Day Challenge

(Irontribe/Contributed)

Already dreading the inevitable holiday weight gain? Wondering how you’re going to get back in shape after weeks of Christmas parties and sugary desserts? If this sounds familiar, Iron Tribe Fitness has the perfect solution for you: the 2020 28-Day Challenge.

Challenge participants will have access to three cutting-edge workouts a week at an Iron Tribe gym, a personal accountability coach, world-class online support and a custom meal plan that includes a grocery list, individualized food-prep instructions and 42 recipes.

Forrest Walden, Iron Tribe’s founder and CEO said the challenge is more than just a workout — it’s a life-changing experience.

191

“It’s truly astounding! So many people have walked through our doors this past year and have had their lives completely transformed by the program. Blending proper nutrition and high-intensity exercise training is a game changer,” Walden said.

Founded locally in Birmingham, Alabama, the nationally acclaimed group fitness program is ranked as one of America’s top five best workouts, with thousands of locals swearing by it.

With new workouts every day, Iron Tribe members can look forward to their time at the gym. In addition to exciting programming, those who join the challenge will drop weight, gain muscle and see their confidence improve.

“It’s so easy to get burnt out or bored at the gym. That’s not the case with Iron Tribe. We have members who have been doing the program since we opened our doors years ago, and they’re still seeing results,” Walden said.

Ready to kick-start your New Year’s resolutions and weight-loss goals? Sign up today to join the Iron Tribe 28-Day Challenge. Act fast, as spots for this popular program tend to fill up quickly.

And, while you’re at it, you can download a free copy of Iron Tribe’s holiday survival guide here.

Iron Tribe Fitness helps Alabamians get in shape with the 2020 28-Day Challenge

(Irontribe/Contributed)

Already dreading the inevitable holiday weight gain? Wondering how you’re going to get back in shape after weeks of Christmas parties and sugary desserts? If this sounds familiar, Iron Tribe Fitness has the perfect solution for you: the 2020 28-Day Challenge.

Challenge participants will have access to three cutting-edge workouts a week at an Iron Tribe gym, a personal accountability coach, world-class online support and a custom meal plan that includes a grocery list, individualized food-prep instructions and 42 recipes.

Forrest Walden, Iron Tribe’s founder and CEO said the challenge is more than just a workout — it’s a life-changing experience.

191

“It’s truly astounding! So many people have walked through our doors this past year and have had their lives completely transformed by the program. Blending proper nutrition and high-intensity exercise training is a game changer,” Walden said.

Founded locally in Birmingham, Alabama, the nationally acclaimed group fitness program is ranked as one of America’s top five best workouts, with thousands of locals swearing by it.

With new workouts every day, Iron Tribe members can look forward to their time at the gym. In addition to exciting programming, those who join the challenge will drop weight, gain muscle and see their confidence improve.

“It’s so easy to get burnt out or bored at the gym. That’s not the case with Iron Tribe. We have members who have been doing the program since we opened our doors years ago, and they’re still seeing results,” Walden said.

Ready to kick-start your New Year’s resolutions and weight-loss goals? Sign up today to join the Iron Tribe 28-Day Challenge. Act fast, as spots for this popular program tend to fill up quickly.

And, while you’re at it, you can download a free copy of Iron Tribe’s holiday survival guide here.

Iron Tribe Fitness helps Alabamians get in shape with the 2020 28-Day Challenge

(Irontribe/Contributed)

Already dreading the inevitable holiday weight gain? Wondering how you’re going to get back in shape after weeks of Christmas parties and sugary desserts? If this sounds familiar, Iron Tribe Fitness has the perfect solution for you: the 2020 28-Day Challenge.

Challenge participants will have access to three cutting-edge workouts a week at an Iron Tribe gym, a personal accountability coach, world-class online support and a custom meal plan that includes a grocery list, individualized food-prep instructions and 42 recipes.

Forrest Walden, Iron Tribe’s founder and CEO said the challenge is more than just a workout — it’s a life-changing experience.

191

“It’s truly astounding! So many people have walked through our doors this past year and have had their lives completely transformed by the program. Blending proper nutrition and high-intensity exercise training is a game changer,” Walden said.

Founded locally in Birmingham, Alabama, the nationally acclaimed group fitness program is ranked as one of America’s top five best workouts, with thousands of locals swearing by it.

With new workouts every day, Iron Tribe members can look forward to their time at the gym. In addition to exciting programming, those who join the challenge will drop weight, gain muscle and see their confidence improve.

“It’s so easy to get burnt out or bored at the gym. That’s not the case with Iron Tribe. We have members who have been doing the program since we opened our doors years ago, and they’re still seeing results,” Walden said.

Ready to kick-start your New Year’s resolutions and weight-loss goals? Sign up today to join the Iron Tribe 28-Day Challenge. Act fast, as spots for this popular program tend to fill up quickly.

And, while you’re at it, you can download a free copy of Iron Tribe’s holiday survival guide here.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment tomorrow in Tuscaloosa

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice will conclude its Courthouse Appreciation Tour and Social next week in Tuscaloosa. The Association and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.

Join us for fun and refreshments in Tuscaloosa County on Monday, December 16, 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., 714 Greensboro Avenue, Tuscaloosa, AL.

35

The Courthouse Appreciation Tour began in September and has included several stops around the state. Check out highlights from the tour’s first stop in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

The biggest birthday party in Alabama history is TODAY!

(Alabama Bicentennial/Contributed)

The biggest birthday party in Alabama’s history is taking place today, December 14, and you are invited! Join us in Montgomery for the grand finale celebration of our state’s 200th birthday.

Watch the parade, listen to concerts and performances, visit open houses and much more.

This is sure to be a day you don’t want to miss. The event is free to the public and lasts all day starting with an elaborate parade at 10:00 a.m. The parade will travel from Court Square Fountain in downtown Montgomery up Dexter Avenue to the State Capitol. There will be marching bands, city floats and unique displays of Alabama history on wheels, such as the USS Alabama and U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

The parade is a great opportunity for families to enjoy the celebration together – and it’s only the beginning of a packed day. Following the parade, Governor Kay Ivey will dedicate Bicentennial Park. The afternoon will offer performances, exhibitions and open houses throughout downtown Montgomery. The day will conclude with a concert featuring popular musicians from Alabama and the history of Alabama presented in a never-before-seen way.

Visit Alabama 200 Finale for a complete rundown of the day’s events.

1

You’re invited!

(Alabama Bicentennial/Contributed)

The biggest birthday party in Alabama’s history is taking place on December 14, and you are invited! Join us in Montgomery for the grand finale celebration of our state’s 200th birthday.

Watch the parade, listen to concerts and performances, visit open houses and much more.

This is sure to be a day you don’t want to miss. The event is free to the public and lasts all day starting with an elaborate parade at 10:00 a.m. The parade will travel from Court Square Fountain in downtown Montgomery up Dexter Avenue to the State Capitol. There will be marching bands, city floats and unique displays of Alabama history on wheels, such as the USS Alabama and U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

The parade is a great opportunity for families to enjoy the celebration together – and it’s only the beginning of a packed day. Following the parade, Governor Kay Ivey will dedicate Bicentennial Park. The afternoon will offer performances, exhibitions and open houses throughout downtown Montgomery. The day will conclude with a concert featuring popular musicians from Alabama and the history of Alabama presented in a never-before-seen way.

Visit Alabama 200 Finale for a complete rundown of the day’s events.

1

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment in Tuscaloosa

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice will conclude its Courthouse Appreciation Tour and Social next week in Tuscaloosa. The Association and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.

Join us for fun and refreshments in Tuscaloosa County on Monday, December 16, 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., 714 Greensboro Avenue, Tuscaloosa, AL.

35

The Courthouse Appreciation Tour began in September and has included several stops around the state. Check out highlights from the tour’s first stop in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

You’re invited!

(Alabama Bicentennial/Contributed)

The biggest birthday party in Alabama’s history is taking place on December 14, and you are invited! Join us in Montgomery for the grand finale celebration of our state’s 200th birthday.

Watch the parade, listen to concerts and performances, visit open houses and much more.

This is sure to be a day you don’t want to miss. The event is free to the public and lasts all day starting with an elaborate parade at 10:00 a.m. The parade will travel from Court Square Fountain in downtown Montgomery up Dexter Avenue to the State Capitol. There will be marching bands, city floats and unique displays of Alabama history on wheels, such as the USS Alabama and U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

The parade is a great opportunity for families to enjoy the celebration together – and it’s only the beginning of a packed day. Following the parade, Governor Kay Ivey will dedicate Bicentennial Park. The afternoon will offer performances, exhibitions and open houses throughout downtown Montgomery. The day will conclude with a concert featuring popular musicians from Alabama and the history of Alabama presented in a never-before-seen way.

Visit Alabama 200 Finale for a complete rundown of the day’s events.

1

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment in Tuscaloosa

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice will conclude its Courthouse Appreciation Tour and Social next week in Tuscaloosa. The Association and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.

Join us for fun and refreshments in Tuscaloosa County on Monday, December 16, 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., 714 Greensboro Avenue, Tuscaloosa, AL.

35

The Courthouse Appreciation Tour began in September and has included several stops around the state. Check out highlights from the tour’s first stop in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

You’re invited!

(Alabama Bicentennial/Contributed)

The biggest birthday party in Alabama’s history is taking place on December 14, and you are invited! Join us in Montgomery for the grand finale celebration of our state’s 200th birthday.

Watch the parade, listen to concerts and performances, visit open houses and much more.

This is sure to be a day you don’t want to miss. The event is free to the public and lasts all day starting with an elaborate parade at 10:00 a.m. The parade will travel from Court Square Fountain in downtown Montgomery up Dexter Avenue to the State Capitol. There will be marching bands, city floats and unique displays of Alabama history on wheels, such as the USS Alabama and U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

The parade is a great opportunity for families to enjoy the celebration together – and it’s only the beginning of a packed day. Following the parade, Governor Kay Ivey will dedicate Bicentennial Park. The afternoon will offer performances, exhibitions and open houses throughout downtown Montgomery. The day will conclude with a concert featuring popular musicians from Alabama and the history of Alabama presented in a never-before-seen way.

Visit Alabama 200 Finale for a complete rundown of the day’s events.

1

You’re invited!

(Alabama Bicentennial/Contributed)

The biggest birthday party in Alabama’s history is taking place on December 14, and you are invited! Join us in Montgomery for the grand finale celebration of our state’s 200th birthday.

Watch the parade, listen to concerts and performances, visit open houses and much more.

This is sure to be a day you don’t want to miss. The event is free to the public and lasts all day starting with an elaborate parade at 10:00 a.m. The parade will travel from Court Square Fountain in downtown Montgomery up Dexter Avenue to the State Capitol. There will be marching bands, city floats and unique displays of Alabama history on wheels, such as the USS Alabama and U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

The parade is a great opportunity for families to enjoy the celebration together – and it’s only the beginning of a packed day. Following the parade, Governor Kay Ivey will dedicate Bicentennial Park. The afternoon will offer performances, exhibitions and open houses throughout downtown Montgomery. The day will conclude with a concert featuring popular musicians from Alabama and the history of Alabama presented in a never-before-seen way.

Visit Alabama 200 Finale for a complete rundown of the day’s events.

1

Howell T. Heflin: A principled servant in Alabama history

(Congress.gov/Contributed, YHN)

Howell T. Heflin pursued his illustrious career in public service with uncommon integrity.

In a time of war, on the bench and representing his state in Washington, Heflin sought to discern what was wrong and fight for what was right.

During his time in the United States Senate, colleagues and observers often described him as the conscience of the upper chamber. That designation very well summarized his approach to public service at every point along the way.

593

The son of a Methodist minister, Heflin graduated from Colbert County High School in Leighton and then from Birmingham-Southern College with degree in history and political science in 1942.

Called to war, Heflin served in the United States Marine Corps from 1942 to 1946. He received the Silver Star and two Purple Heart medals during his service.

He returned home to Alabama and graduated from the University of Alabama School of Law in 1948. He then built a successful law practice in Tuscumbia and began his journey of service to the state’s judicial system. In 1963, Heflin was elected to serve as president of the Alabama Trial Lawyers Association, and he served as president of the Alabama State Bar Association from 1965 to 1966.

He was elected to serve as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court in 1970, a position in which he served for six years.

Heflin left an indelible mark on Alabama’s justice system during his time on the court.

During his term, he led a successful effort to adopt the Judicial Article of 1973 which modernized Alabama’s judicial system. These much-needed reforms created the Unified Judicial System and put into place requirements that judges be licensed attorneys and the legislature fund the judicial system. The initiative also included the adoption of standards of judicial professionalism.

In 1976, the American Association of Trial Lawyers named Heflin the nation’s Most Outstanding Appellate Judge.

Voters in Alabama elected Heflin to the United States Senate in 1978, a body where he served for 18 years.

A zealous advocate for the people of his state, Heflin fought tirelessly in Washington for the agriculture and aerospace industries.

Addressed as “Judge” by his fellow senators, Heflin’s spirit for reforming the justice system endured on Capitol Hill just as it had all those years as a member of the bench and the bar.

He sought reform of the federal criminal justice system, citing what he considered unnecessary delays in bringing John Hinckley to trial for his assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan.

Heflin said at the time, “The slow, cumbersome and too-often ineffective American criminal justice system must be overhauled so it can more efficiently and effectively deal with the rising epidemic of violent crime in this nation.”

He was a proponent of the Legal Services Corporation and sponsored legislation to create the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, State Justice Institute, Civil Justice Reform Act, National Commission on Judicial Discipline, Justice Assistance Act and Permanent Federal Court Study of 1988 and Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1994.

In recognition of his reform efforts, Heflin received the John Marshall Award from the American Bar Association Justice Center for the extraordinary improvement in the administration of justice.

In his farewell speech on the floor of the U.S. Senate in 1996, he talked about how he was “exceedingly proud” of his record on civil rights issues. He poignantly remarked, “No one of us can remake government or society in our own image.”

In 2001, Alabama-based NewSouth Books published an insightful authorized biography of Heflin. Written by John Hayman and his wife Clara Ruth Hayman, A Judge in the Senate: Howell Heflin’s Career of Politics and Principle focused on Heflin’s position as one of the last Roosevelt-style Southern Democrats and his impeccable character. Writer Dave Bryan remarked of the book, “Hayman argues convincingly that Heflin was a progressive politician in a state perhaps best known for its violent opposition to the civil rights movement and its segregationist past under former Governor George Wallace.”

Following his time in the U.S. Senate, Heflin lived in Tuscumbia and continued to work for the people of his state until his passing in 2005.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment tomorrow in Mobile and Houston Counties

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join us for fun and refreshments in Mobile County on Monday, November 18, 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL.

The tour will continue to Houston County on Tuesday, November 19, 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 114 N. Oates Street, Room 318, Dothan, AL.

40

This is the 10th of multiple stops on the Courthouse Appreciation Tour and the focus will be Alabama’s Appellate Courts.  Check out highlights from the tour’s first stop in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment in Mobile and Houston Counties

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join us for fun and refreshments in Mobile County on Monday, November 18, 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL.

The tour will continue to Houston County on Tuesday, November 19, 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 114 N. Oates Street, Room 318, Dothan, AL.

40

This is the 10th of multiple stops on the Courthouse Appreciation Tour and the focus will be Alabama’s Appellate Courts.  Check out highlights from the tour’s first stop in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment in Mobile and Houston Counties

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial. Join us for fun and refreshments in Mobile County on Monday, November 18, 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL.

The tour will continue to Houston County on Tuesday, November 19, 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 114 N. Oates Street, Room 318, Dothan, AL.

40

This is the 10th of multiple stops on the Courthouse Appreciation Tour and the focus will be Alabama’s Appellate Courts.  Check out highlights from the tour’s first stop in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training