The Wire

  • New tunnel, premium RV section at Talladega Superspeedway on schedule despite weather

    Excerpt:

    Construction of a new oversized vehicle tunnel and premium RV infield parking section at Talladega Superspeedway is still on schedule to be completed in time for the April NASCAR race, despite large amounts of rainfall and unusual groundwater conditions underneath the track.

    Track Chairman Grant Lynch, during a news conference Wednesday at the track, said he’s amazed the general contractor, Taylor Corporation of Oxford, has been able to keep the project on schedule.

    “The amount of water they have pumped out of that and the extra engineering they did from the original design, basically to keep that tunnel from floating up out of the earth, was remarkable,” Lynch said.

  • Alabama workers built 1.6M engines in 2018 to add auto horsepower

    Excerpt:

    Alabama’s auto workers built nearly 1.6 million engines last year, as the state industry continues to carve out a place in global markets with innovative, high-performance parts, systems and finished vehicles.

    Last year also saw major new developments in engine manufacturing among the state’s key players, and more advanced infrastructure is on the way in the coming year.

    Hyundai expects to complete a key addition to its engine operations in Montgomery during the first half of 2019, while Honda continues to reap the benefits of a cutting-edge Alabama engine line installed several years ago.

  • Groundbreaking on Alabama’s newest aerospace plant made possible through key partnerships

    Excerpt:

    Political and business leaders gathered for a groundbreaking at Alabama’s newest aerospace plant gave credit to the formation of the many key partnerships that made it possible.

    Governor Kay Ivey and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event which celebrated the construction of rocket engine builder Blue Origin’s facility in Huntsville.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment in Mobile and Houston Counties

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial. Join us for fun and refreshments in Mobile County on Monday, November 18, 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL.

The tour will continue to Houston County on Tuesday, November 19, 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 114 N. Oates Street, Room 318, Dothan, AL.

40

This is the 10th of multiple stops on the Courthouse Appreciation Tour and the focus will be Alabama’s Appellate Courts.  Check out highlights from the tour’s first stop in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Blind spots on Alabama’s Workforce Super Highway

(Made in Alabama/Contributed, PIxabay, YHN)

Have you ever been traveling down the highway, about to change lanes when you look over your shoulder and see there is a car in your blind spot? How long was it there? Why didn’t you notice it before?

It’s critical to the situation at hand, and all it took was a different perspective to notice it. When traveling the Workforce Super Highway there are several population segments that are crucial to solving our workforce needs, but we have failed to look at them from a different perspective.

A quick glance around shows an untapped labor source right in front of us, living in our communities and across each of the seven workforce regions. They are shopping with you at the grocery store, sitting in the stands at the Friday night ball games and very much qualified to work in most of the jobs open in Alabama.

437

They are people who simply need an opportunity and training to become key travelers on the Alabama Workforce Super Highway.

So, who are these potential workers? They are Alabama citizens who are deaf/hard of hearing, have vision loss, or have an intellectual or physical disability and require accommodations to obtain or maintain employment. Each day, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) works with Alabamians with disabilities to provide vocational evaluations, recommend accommodations or assist with training to ensure employee success.

ADRS also works with employers at no cost, providing pre-hire screening and disability-related training and recommending worksite accommodations needed to retain valued employees.

Families, friends and recovering addicts affected by the Opioid Crisis are another group of potential workers in the blind spot. You may have seen all the attention given to this topic…this is a crisis, but with the right intervention, an addict can be rehabilitated. With the help of professionals, they can find their place in our workforce.

It is fixable and Governor Ivey has appointed some brilliant people who are working diligently to help our state with strategies to reverse the situation. Today, a large number of these affected individuals could be your next employee.

State and federal prisoners in Alabama represent a future workforce segment of very capable and skilled individuals. There are many re-entry programs across the state involved with assisting soon-to-be-released prisoners with a means to employment.

One of those organizations is the Alabama Community College System (ACCS). ACCS has several dedicated programs looking for opportunities to connect these men and women back into the workforce.

The Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR) works to connect individuals with training and social skill development to provide opportunities to enter the workforce. Many of DHR’s clients receive SNAP and TANF federal dollars and face economic, transportation and childcare barriers preventing them from working.

DHR works closely with Family Resource Centers across the state to help these potential workers overcome barriers to employment.

In essence, workforce sources that are often overlooked or forgotten are extremely important and valuable to Alabama’s growing workforce demand. These sources are not “mainstream” and sometimes require a little more work and effort, but typically these individuals when given a chance to prove themselves are extraordinary, loyal and committed.

None of these sources is the complete answer to our workforce challenges, but they are great sources of untapped potential to be used in
tandem.

Contact each of these agencies for more information or simply go to AlabamaWorks.com for contact information and motor onto the Workforce Super Highway.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of Alabama Industrial Development Training

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment tomorrow in Montgomery

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, October 21, 3:00 pm to 3:30 pm, 251 South Lawrence Street, Montgomery, AL in the Jury Assembly Room on the 4th Floor.

39

This is the seventh of multiple stops on the Courthouse Appreciation Tour and the focus will be Alabama’s Appellate Courts.  Check out highlights from last month’s event in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment in Montgomery

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, October 21, 3:00 pm to 3:30 pm, 251 South Lawrence Street, Montgomery, AL in the Jury Assembly Room on the 4th Floor.

39

This is the seventh of multiple stops on the Courthouse Appreciation Tour and the focus will be Alabama’s Appellate Courts.  Check out highlights from last month’s event in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment in Montgomery

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and its members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, October 21, 3:00 pm to 3:30 pm, 251 South Lawrence Street, Montgomery, AL in the Jury Assembly Room on the 4th Floor.

39

This is the seventh of multiple stops on the Courthouse Appreciation Tour and the focus will be Alabama’s Appellate Courts.  Check out highlights from last month’s event in Jefferson County.

For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

Is your business prepared for a cyber attack?

(Pixabay, YHN)

Every business or organization, no matter the size or focus, is at risk of a cyber attack.
Did you know:

-43% of all cyber attacks are aimed at small businesses (Source: Small Business Trends)
-91% of attacks are started with a phishing email (Source: Verizon)
-38% of malicious attachments are masked as one of Microsoft Office file types. (Source: Cisco)
-65% of companies have over 500 employees that have never changed their password. (Source: Varonis)
-14 seconds is how often a business falls victim to ransomware. (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures)
-95% of data breaches are attributed to human error. (Source: Cybint Solutions)

The bottom line: Those with malicious intent are out to access, steal, alter, disable or destroy what does not rightfully belong to them. Let the experts at Gray Analytics help.

277

Each day during National Cyber Security Awareness Month, Gray Analytics will be posting new information to better arm you against potential threats.  Videos, giveaways and more can be found online Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn as well as daily blog posts.

Mike Manley, president of Gray Analytics explains why taking cybersecurity seriously is vital to all businesses.

“We live in an interconnected, digital information age where every individual and organization has the potential to be exposed to adverse events related to electronically stored information. Information such as personally identifiable information, (PII) personal health information, (PHI) personal or corporate financial information, military secrets, intellectual property, private/confidential organizational information, or social media are all susceptible to cyberattacks.”

“Cybersecurity is simply the practice of protecting all this information from these cyberattacks. There are a host of adversaries who desire to gain access to and use this information for harm or militaristic, economic, or personal gain. These adversaries include nation-states, cybercriminals, and political activists (hacktivist). Every individual and organization should be aware of and use the best human and technical behaviors and practices available to protect this information.”

“At Gray Analytics, we believe that cybersecurity is a required practice in defending individuals, organizations, and our country against these adversaries, both domestic and foreign. The best technical defenses cannot work without better human awareness and behavior, and National Cyber Awareness Month is a great way to continue to raise this awareness.”

Based in Huntsville, AL Gray Analytics has over a decade of both enterprise cybersecurity and supply chain cybersecurity support and has been recognized as experts for their service to U.S. Government and private enterprise clients.

Alabama’s workforce superhighway

(AlabamaWorks!/Contributed, YHN)

Alabama’s workforce programs have undergone several changes in the past couple years and to say that this has caused some confusion would be a huge understatement!

I liken it to the 1956 Federal-Aid Highway Act which created the beginnings of the Interstate system that focused on building a system of connected roads that would funnel traffic from smaller roads into safer, more efficient “Super Highways.”

When we look at workforce development in Alabama over the last 50 years, we’ve been a mishmash of programs or smaller roads all leading to the same goal, but having to travel those roads on a wildly divergent path.

In a few words, I’d like to clear up the confusion and untie the knot related to the programs housed within the Alabama Department of Commerce.

443

Commerce has two divisions: Business Development and Workforce Development. In the workforce division, there are five areas of responsibility: AIDT, WIOA, AWC, RWCs and AOA.

AIDT is Alabama’s premier workforce training incentive. We offer job-specific training to new and expanding industries in Alabama and expand job opportunities of its citizens. AIDT does this at no cost to the company or the citizen.

In addition, through the use of our Centers of Excellence, AIDT provides “upskilling” for existing companies in Alabama through in-depth training in robotics and automation at the Alabama Robotics Technology Park, Maritime and shipbuilding training at the Maritime Training Center.

The WIOA or Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act is a federal program used to help socially and economically disadvantaged populations and dislocated workers. WIOA funds the One-Stop Career Centers (managed by DOL) and also provides Rapid Response teams to affected plants that are closing.

Their goal is to keep as many workers working and retrain, through financial assistance and scholarships, those workers that need new skills to remain viable employees.

The AWC or Alabama Workforce Council is an advisory council whose main mission is to facilitate the strategic workforce agenda across Alabama to ensure that the goals are achieved. The AWC, made up of business and industry leaders, routinely advise and promote legislative matters to continually improve the workforce system in Alabama.

The RWCs or Regional Workforce Councils (7) focus their attention on a more local level. Each council is made up of business and local leaders from their respective counties and are directed to help identify issues in the workforce and plan strategically for how to overcome any obstacles.

Then there is the Alabama Office of Apprenticeship or AOA, originally created by legislation in 2016 as Apprenticeship Alabama. New legislation in 2019 created a state apprenticeship agency that will now serve as the central hub for certifying and managing apprenticeships here in Alabama.

AOA will now be able to certify not only Registered Apprenticeship Programs but the new Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAPS). The new IRAPs are for apprenticeships in more non-traditional business sectors such as tech companies or healthcare.

We have taken these five feeder roads and merged them into our “Workforce Superhighway” that ultimately leads the state to the goal of Success Plus, Governor Kay Ivey’s plan to have more than 500,000 credentialed workers in Alabama by 2025.

This new crop of workers and those who are looking for a new direction should be able to effortlessly travel the new “Workforce Super Highway” with easy access and exits through the state’s new portal known as AlabamaWorks! Please see www.alabamaworks.com when you are ready.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of AIDT

Your data is everywhere, is it secure?

(Pixabay)

Operating in the digital information age, the capabilities of bad actors to do grave and sometimes irreparable damage are numerous. Gray Analytics wants to help our country, its businesses and organizations improve security in the cyber realm.

Each day during National Cyber Security Awareness Month Gray Analytics will be posting new information to better arm you against potential threats.  Videos, giveaways and more can be found online Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn as well as daily blog posts.

1

Alabama’s workforce superhighway

(AlabamaWorks!/Contributed, YHN)

Alabama’s workforce programs have undergone several changes in the past couple years and to say that this has caused some confusion would be a huge understatement!

I liken it to the 1956 Federal-Aid Highway Act which created the beginnings of the Interstate system that focused on building a system of connected roads that would funnel traffic from smaller roads into safer, more efficient “Super Highways.”

When we look at workforce development in Alabama over the last 50 years, we’ve been a mishmash of programs or smaller roads all leading to the same goal, but having to travel those roads on a wildly divergent path.

In a few words, I’d like to clear up the confusion and untie the knot related to the programs housed within the Alabama Department of Commerce.

443

Commerce has two divisions: Business Development and Workforce Development. In the workforce division, there are five areas of responsibility: AIDT, WIOA, AWC, RWCs and AOA.

AIDT is Alabama’s premier workforce training incentive. We offer job-specific training to new and expanding industries in Alabama and expand job opportunities of its citizens. AIDT does this at no cost to the company or the citizen.

In addition, through the use of our Centers of Excellence, AIDT provides “upskilling” for existing companies in Alabama through in-depth training in robotics and automation at the Alabama Robotics Technology Park, Maritime and shipbuilding training at the Maritime Training Center.

The WIOA or Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act is a federal program used to help socially and economically disadvantaged populations and dislocated workers. WIOA funds the One-Stop Career Centers (managed by DOL) and also provides Rapid Response teams to affected plants that are closing.

Their goal is to keep as many workers working and retrain, through financial assistance and scholarships, those workers that need new skills to remain viable employees.

The AWC or Alabama Workforce Council is an advisory council whose main mission is to facilitate the strategic workforce agenda across Alabama to ensure that the goals are achieved. The AWC, made up of business and industry leaders, routinely advise and promote legislative matters to continually improve the workforce system in Alabama.

The RWCs or Regional Workforce Councils (7) focus their attention on a more local level. Each council is made up of business and local leaders from their respective counties and are directed to help identify issues in the workforce and plan strategically for how to overcome any obstacles.

Then there is the Alabama Office of Apprenticeship or AOA, originally created by legislation in 2016 as Apprenticeship Alabama. New legislation in 2019 created a state apprenticeship agency that will now serve as the central hub for certifying and managing apprenticeships here in Alabama.

AOA will now be able to certify not only Registered Apprenticeship Programs but the new Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAPS). The new IRAPs are for apprenticeships in more non-traditional business sectors such as tech companies or healthcare.

We have taken these five feeder roads and merged them into our “Workforce Superhighway” that ultimately leads the state to the goal of Success Plus, Governor Kay Ivey’s plan to have more than 500,000 credentialed workers in Alabama by 2025.

This new crop of workers and those who are looking for a new direction should be able to effortlessly travel the new “Workforce Super Highway” with easy access and exits through the state’s new portal known as AlabamaWorks! Please see www.alabamaworks.com when you are ready.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of AIDT

Is your business prepared for a cyber attack?

(Pixabay, YHN)

Every business or organization, no matter the size or focus, is at risk of a cyber attack.
Did you know:

-43% of all cyber attacks are aimed at small businesses (Source: Small Business Trends)
-91% of attacks are started with a phishing email (Source: Verizon)
-38% of malicious attachments are masked as one of Microsoft Office file types. (Source: Cisco)
-65% of companies have over 500 employees that have never changed their password. (Source: Varonis)
-14 seconds is how often a business falls victim to ransomware. (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures)
-95% of data breaches are attributed to human error. (Source: Cybint Solutions)

The bottom line: Those with malicious intent are out to access, steal, alter, disable or destroy what does not rightfully belong to them. Let the experts at Gray Analytics help.

278

Each day during National Cyber Security Awareness Month, Gray Analytics will be posting new information to better arm you against potential threats.  Videos, giveaways and more can be found online Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn as well as daily blog posts.

Mike Manley, president of Gray Analytics explains why taking cybersecurity seriously is vital to all businesses.

“We live in an interconnected, digital information age where every individual and organization has the potential to be exposed to adverse events related to electronically stored information. Information such as personally identifiable information, (PII) personal health information, (PHI) personal or corporate financial information, military secrets, intellectual property, private/confidential organizational information, or social media are all susceptible to cyberattacks.”

“Cybersecurity is simply the practice of protecting all this information from these cyberattacks. There are a host of adversaries who desire to gain access to and use this information for harm or militaristic, economic, or personal gain. These adversaries include nation-states, cybercriminals, and political activists (hacktivist). Every individual and organization should be aware of and use the best human and technical behaviors and practices available to protect this information.”

“At Gray Analytics, we believe that cybersecurity is a required practice in defending individuals, organizations, and our country against these adversaries, both domestic and foreign. The best technical defenses cannot work without better human awareness and behavior, and National Cyber Awareness Month is a great way to continue to raise this awareness.”

Based in Huntsville, AL Gray Analytics has over a decade of both enterprise cybersecurity and supply chain cybersecurity support and has been recognized as experts for their service to U.S. Government and private enterprise clients.

Alabama’s workforce superhighway

(AlabamaWorks!/Contributed, YHN)

Alabama’s workforce programs have undergone several changes in the past couple years and to say that this has caused some confusion would be a huge understatement!

I liken it to the 1956 Federal-Aid Highway Act which created the beginnings of the Interstate system that focused on building a system of connected roads that would funnel traffic from smaller roads into safer, more efficient “Super Highways.”

When we look at workforce development in Alabama over the last 50 years, we’ve been a mishmash of programs or smaller roads all leading to the same goal, but having to travel those roads on a wildly divergent path.

In a few words, I’d like to clear up the confusion and untie the knot related to the programs housed within the Alabama Department of Commerce.

443

Commerce has two divisions: Business Development and Workforce Development. In the workforce division, there are five areas of responsibility: AIDT, WIOA, AWC, RWCs and AOA.

AIDT is Alabama’s premier workforce training incentive. We offer job-specific training to new and expanding industries in Alabama and expand job opportunities of its citizens. AIDT does this at no cost to the company or the citizen.

In addition, through the use of our Centers of Excellence, AIDT provides “upskilling” for existing companies in Alabama through in-depth training in robotics and automation at the Alabama Robotics Technology Park, Maritime and shipbuilding training at the Maritime Training Center.

The WIOA or Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act is a federal program used to help socially and economically disadvantaged populations and dislocated workers. WIOA funds the One-Stop Career Centers (managed by DOL) and also provides Rapid Response teams to affected plants that are closing.

Their goal is to keep as many workers working and retrain, through financial assistance and scholarships, those workers that need new skills to remain viable employees.

The AWC or Alabama Workforce Council is an advisory council whose main mission is to facilitate the strategic workforce agenda across Alabama to ensure that the goals are achieved. The AWC, made up of business and industry leaders, routinely advise and promote legislative matters to continually improve the workforce system in Alabama.

The RWCs or Regional Workforce Councils (7) focus their attention on a more local level. Each council is made up of business and local leaders from their respective counties and are directed to help identify issues in the workforce and plan strategically for how to overcome any obstacles.

Then there is the Alabama Office of Apprenticeship or AOA, originally created by legislation in 2016 as Apprenticeship Alabama. New legislation in 2019 created a state apprenticeship agency that will now serve as the central hub for certifying and managing apprenticeships here in Alabama.

AOA will now be able to certify not only Registered Apprenticeship Programs but the new Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAPS). The new IRAPs are for apprenticeships in more non-traditional business sectors such as tech companies or healthcare.

We have taken these five feeder roads and merged them into our “Workforce Superhighway” that ultimately leads the state to the goal of Success Plus, Governor Kay Ivey’s plan to have more than 500,000 credentialed workers in Alabama by 2025.

This new crop of workers and those who are looking for a new direction should be able to effortlessly travel the new “Workforce Super Highway” with easy access and exits through the state’s new portal known as AlabamaWorks! Please see www.alabamaworks.com when you are ready.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of AIDT

Your data is everywhere, is it secure?

(Pixabay)

Operating in the digital information age, the capabilities of bad actors to do grave and sometimes irreparable damage are numerous. Gray Analytics wants to help our country, its businesses and organizations improve security in the cyber realm.

Each day during National Cyber Security Awareness Month Gray Analytics will be posting new information to better arm you against potential threats.  Videos, giveaways and more can be found online Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn as well as daily blog posts.

1

Is your business surviving or thriving?

According to the Small Business Administration, there over 20 million small businesses in the United States. Sadly, less than 35% of them will still be around in 10 years. Even worse, with the right kind of help, many could have been saved.  Armed with over five decades of proven success, Team Delta 3 is ready to teach you to grow your business.  Use code Yellowhammer2019 to register today.

1

Alabama’s workforce superhighway

(AlabamaWorks!/Contributed, YHN)

Alabama’s workforce programs have undergone several changes in the past couple years and to say that this has caused some confusion would be a huge understatement!

I liken it to the 1956 Federal-Aid Highway Act which created the beginnings of the Interstate system that focused on building a system of connected roads that would funnel traffic from smaller roads into safer, more efficient “Super Highways.”

When we look at workforce development in Alabama over the last 50 years, we’ve been a mishmash of programs or smaller roads all leading to the same goal, but having to travel those roads on a wildly divergent path.

In a few words, I’d like to clear up the confusion and untie the knot related to the programs housed within the Alabama Department of Commerce.

443

Commerce has two divisions: Business Development and Workforce Development. In the workforce division, there are five areas of responsibility: AIDT, WIOA, AWC, RWCs and AOA.

AIDT is Alabama’s premier workforce training incentive. We offer job-specific training to new and expanding industries in Alabama and expand job opportunities of its citizens. AIDT does this at no cost to the company or the citizen.

In addition, through the use of our Centers of Excellence, AIDT provides “upskilling” for existing companies in Alabama through in-depth training in robotics and automation at the Alabama Robotics Technology Park, Maritime and shipbuilding training at the Maritime Training Center.

The WIOA or Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act is a federal program used to help socially and economically disadvantaged populations and dislocated workers. WIOA funds the One-Stop Career Centers (managed by DOL) and also provides Rapid Response teams to affected plants that are closing.

Their goal is to keep as many workers working and retrain, through financial assistance and scholarships, those workers that need new skills to remain viable employees.

The AWC or Alabama Workforce Council is an advisory council whose main mission is to facilitate the strategic workforce agenda across Alabama to ensure that the goals are achieved. The AWC, made up of business and industry leaders, routinely advise and promote legislative matters to continually improve the workforce system in Alabama.

The RWCs or Regional Workforce Councils (7) focus their attention on a more local level. Each council is made up of business and local leaders from their respective counties and are directed to help identify issues in the workforce and plan strategically for how to overcome any obstacles.

Then there is the Alabama Office of Apprenticeship or AOA, originally created by legislation in 2016 as Apprenticeship Alabama. New legislation in 2019 created a state apprenticeship agency that will now serve as the central hub for certifying and managing apprenticeships here in Alabama.

AOA will now be able to certify not only Registered Apprenticeship Programs but the new Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAPS). The new IRAPs are for apprenticeships in more non-traditional business sectors such as tech companies or healthcare.

We have taken these five feeder roads and merged them into our “Workforce Superhighway” that ultimately leads the state to the goal of Success Plus, Governor Kay Ivey’s plan to have more than 500,000 credentialed workers in Alabama by 2025.

This new crop of workers and those who are looking for a new direction should be able to effortlessly travel the new “Workforce Super Highway” with easy access and exits through the state’s new portal known as AlabamaWorks! Please see www.alabamaworks.com when you are ready.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of AIDT

Is your business surviving or thriving?

According to the Small Business Administration, there over 20 million small businesses in the United States. Sadly, less than 35% of them will still be around in 10 years. Even worse, with the right kind of help, many could have been saved.  Armed with over five decades of proven success, Team Delta 3 is ready to teach you to grow your business.  Use code Yellowhammer2019 to register today.

1

Alabama’s workforce superhighway

(AlabamaWorks!/Contributed, YHN)

Alabama’s workforce programs have undergone several changes in the past couple years and to say that this has caused some confusion would be a huge understatement!

I liken it to the 1956 Federal-Aid Highway Act which created the beginnings of the Interstate system that focused on building a system of connected roads that would funnel traffic from smaller roads into safer, more efficient “Super Highways.”

When we look at workforce development in Alabama over the last 50 years, we’ve been a mishmash of programs or smaller roads all leading to the same goal, but having to travel those roads on a wildly divergent path.

In a few words, I’d like to clear up the confusion and untie the knot related to the programs housed within the Alabama Department of Commerce.

443

Commerce has two divisions: Business Development and Workforce Development. In the workforce division, there are five areas of responsibility: AIDT, WIOA, AWC, RWCs and AOA.

AIDT is Alabama’s premier workforce training incentive. We offer job-specific training to new and expanding industries in Alabama and expand job opportunities of its citizens. AIDT does this at no cost to the company or the citizen.

In addition, through the use of our Centers of Excellence, AIDT provides “upskilling” for existing companies in Alabama through in-depth training in robotics and automation at the Alabama Robotics Technology Park, Maritime and shipbuilding training at the Maritime Training Center.

The WIOA or Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act is a federal program used to help socially and economically disadvantaged populations and dislocated workers. WIOA funds the One-Stop Career Centers (managed by DOL) and also provides Rapid Response teams to affected plants that are closing.

Their goal is to keep as many workers working and retrain, through financial assistance and scholarships, those workers that need new skills to remain viable employees.

The AWC or Alabama Workforce Council is an advisory council whose main mission is to facilitate the strategic workforce agenda across Alabama to ensure that the goals are achieved. The AWC, made up of business and industry leaders, routinely advise and promote legislative matters to continually improve the workforce system in Alabama.

The RWCs or Regional Workforce Councils (7) focus their attention on a more local level. Each council is made up of business and local leaders from their respective counties and are directed to help identify issues in the workforce and plan strategically for how to overcome any obstacles.

Then there is the Alabama Office of Apprenticeship or AOA, originally created by legislation in 2016 as Apprenticeship Alabama. New legislation in 2019 created a state apprenticeship agency that will now serve as the central hub for certifying and managing apprenticeships here in Alabama.

AOA will now be able to certify not only Registered Apprenticeship Programs but the new Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAPS). The new IRAPs are for apprenticeships in more non-traditional business sectors such as tech companies or healthcare.

We have taken these five feeder roads and merged them into our “Workforce Superhighway” that ultimately leads the state to the goal of Success Plus, Governor Kay Ivey’s plan to have more than 500,000 credentialed workers in Alabama by 2025.

This new crop of workers and those who are looking for a new direction should be able to effortlessly travel the new “Workforce Super Highway” with easy access and exits through the state’s new portal known as AlabamaWorks! Please see www.alabamaworks.com when you are ready.

Ed Castile is the Deputy Secretary of Commerce, Workforce Development Divison and Director of AIDT

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment Monday at Jefferson County Courthouse

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and their members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, September 23, 10:00 am to 10:30 am at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 716 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. N #251, Birmingham, AL.  For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

1

Is your business surviving or thriving?

According to the Small Business Administration, there over 20 million small businesses in the United States. Sadly, less than 35% of them will still be around in 10 years. Even worse, with the right kind of help, many could have been saved.  Armed with over five decades of proven success, Team Delta 3 is ready to teach you to grow your business.  Use code Yellowhammer2019 to register today.

1

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment at Jefferson County Courthouse

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and their members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, September 23, 10:00 am to 10:30 am at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 716 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. N #251, Birmingham, AL.  For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

1

Celebrate the Seventh Amendment at Jefferson County Courthouse

(YHN)

The Alabama Association of Justice and their members invite all courthouse employees and judicial staff to celebrate 230 years of the Seventh Amendment guaranteeing the right to a civil jury trial.  Join the fun: Monday, September 23, 10:00 am to 10:30 am at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 716 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. N #251, Birmingham, AL.  For more information contact jsmith@alabamajustice.org.

1