The Wire

  • New tunnel, premium RV section at Talladega Superspeedway on schedule despite weather

    Excerpt:

    Construction of a new oversized vehicle tunnel and premium RV infield parking section at Talladega Superspeedway is still on schedule to be completed in time for the April NASCAR race, despite large amounts of rainfall and unusual groundwater conditions underneath the track.

    Track Chairman Grant Lynch, during a news conference Wednesday at the track, said he’s amazed the general contractor, Taylor Corporation of Oxford, has been able to keep the project on schedule.

    “The amount of water they have pumped out of that and the extra engineering they did from the original design, basically to keep that tunnel from floating up out of the earth, was remarkable,” Lynch said.

  • Alabama workers built 1.6M engines in 2018 to add auto horsepower

    Excerpt:

    Alabama’s auto workers built nearly 1.6 million engines last year, as the state industry continues to carve out a place in global markets with innovative, high-performance parts, systems and finished vehicles.

    Last year also saw major new developments in engine manufacturing among the state’s key players, and more advanced infrastructure is on the way in the coming year.

    Hyundai expects to complete a key addition to its engine operations in Montgomery during the first half of 2019, while Honda continues to reap the benefits of a cutting-edge Alabama engine line installed several years ago.

  • Groundbreaking on Alabama’s newest aerospace plant made possible through key partnerships

    Excerpt:

    Political and business leaders gathered for a groundbreaking at Alabama’s newest aerospace plant gave credit to the formation of the many key partnerships that made it possible.

    Governor Kay Ivey and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event which celebrated the construction of rocket engine builder Blue Origin’s facility in Huntsville.

How Alabama’s Iron Tribe Fitness sets the standard for group workouts

(Iron Tribe/Contributed)

Iron Tribe Fitness, founded in Birmingham, Alabama, is leading the way for workout programs across the nation. Ranked as one of the top five workouts in the nation, this 45-minute HIIT group workout class offers participants exciting and effective workouts in a time frame that works with any kind of schedule.

Recently, the gym hosted Coach 201, a weekend training session for their instructors in their downtown Birmingham corporate location. This session brought together all of Iron Tribe’s local coaching staff to review training guidelines and program goals.

254

In hosting this training, Iron Tribe is living out their core value of delivering a consistent experience. Forrest Walden, Iron Tribe’s founder and CEO says this training session taps into the heart of what the program does — which is creating communities that change lives.

“It’s always great to see the entire team come together to fellowship and dive deep into why we do what we do every day,” Walden said.

During the training, Iron Tribe coaches were given the opportunity to learn more about the classes they teach and strengthen their relationships with each other. As a result, the coaches are empowered to return to their home gyms and lead their athletes with renewed skills and confidence.

“Kyle Sottung, our director of product development, is extremely thorough and talented at what he does. To see him lead our Birmingham coaches is always such a blessing. Our coaches are more empowered now than ever to pour into the Birmingham community,” Walden stated.

According to Walden, Iron Tribe is successful because the program is more than just a workout, but a way to strengthen the communities they serve.

“Iron Tribe stands on a list off essential core beliefs. These beliefs steer what we do every day, both inside and outside the gym. It’s our hope that by continuing to develop ourselves that we can be exceptional coaches and role models within our communities,” Walden said.

Ready to get in the best shape of your life? Learn more by visiting irontribefitness.com.

Work-based learning benefits potential employees and employers

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed)

Our unemployment rate is at a record low. Each month, we see reports that more and more people are gaining entry into the labor force. This is great for all Alabamians and our economy.

While this benefits our state as a whole, it can be challenging for businesses to find qualified employees. Many managers and business owners are searching for new ways to attract and retain those they need to keep their companies running at optimum staffing levels. At the same time, some potential employees are having a difficult time finding work because they need to upgrade their skill set.

One option available is the Work Based Learning (WBL) initiative offered via the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act. This is a federally-funded program designed to help individuals find good jobs and stay employed, while unifying and enhancing the state’s employment, education and training programs. It is led by a regional board and is a partner entity of the Alabama Workforce Council.

345

Via WBL, young adults meeting certain requirements can receive valuable experience with companies that register to be a WBL job site. The goal is to promote the development of an individual’s good work habits and basic work skills by participating in a structured, paid, work-based learning activity.

Some of the WBL objectives include laying the foundation for sound at-work habits through meaningful assignments and improving the participant’s occupational and other basic skills through worksite experience. The WBL participant is under close supervision for the duration of the program.

After completion of the WBL program, participants can expect to have a better understanding of future employment or training options. Each person’s WBL activities are carefully reviewed to ensure that the expected goals and objectives are met.

Employers who choose to be a host site for a WBL program will reap the benefits of creating their own workforce pipeline without incurring the expenses of the participant’s wages. An employer gets to try out participants for employment for up to 390 hours free of charge. At the end of the 390 hours, if the employer wants to offer permanent employment to the participant, then the employer has the option to enroll the participant in On-the-Job Training for up to an additional 600 hours.

The On-the-Job Training program gives the participant an opportunity to learn additional job skills and specific duties required by that employer. Under OJT, employers are reimbursed for up to 50% of the participant’s hourly wages for the duration of the training period.

Work Based Learning provides a win-win-win for everyone involved. Participants gain valuable experience in employment, while employers get to know potential employees. Alabama benefits by gaining experienced workers.  WBL is also a component in achieving Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus goal of adding 500,000 credentialed/degreed individuals to the state’s workforce by 2025.

WBL and OJT are just two of the many training opportunities available for people of all ages and backgrounds that also offer a benefit component for businesses. To learn more, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Phee Friend is board coordinator of the Governor’s Local Workforce Areas Workforce Development Division.

 

 

How Alabama’s Iron Tribe Fitness sets the standard for group workouts

(Iron Tribe/Contributed)

Iron Tribe Fitness, founded in Birmingham, Alabama, is leading the way for workout programs across the nation. Ranked as one of the top five workouts in the nation, this 45-minute HIIT group workout class offers participants exciting and effective workouts in a time frame that works with any kind of schedule.

Recently, the gym hosted Coach 201, a weekend training session for their instructors in their downtown Birmingham corporate location. This session brought together all of Iron Tribe’s local coaching staff to review training guidelines and program goals.

254

In hosting this training, Iron Tribe is living out their core value of delivering a consistent experience. Forrest Walden, Iron Tribe’s founder and CEO says this training session taps into the heart of what the program does — which is creating communities that change lives.

“It’s always great to see the entire team come together to fellowship and dive deep into why we do what we do every day,” Walden said.

During the training, Iron Tribe coaches were given the opportunity to learn more about the classes they teach and strengthen their relationships with each other. As a result, the coaches are empowered to return to their home gyms and lead their athletes with renewed skills and confidence.

“Kyle Sottung, our director of product development, is extremely thorough and talented at what he does. To see him lead our Birmingham coaches is always such a blessing. Our coaches are more empowered now than ever to pour into the Birmingham community,” Walden stated.

According to Walden, Iron Tribe is successful because the program is more than just a workout, but a way to strengthen the communities they serve.

“Iron Tribe stands on a list off essential core beliefs. These beliefs steer what we do every day, both inside and outside the gym. It’s our hope that by continuing to develop ourselves that we can be exceptional coaches and role models within our communities,” Walden said.

Ready to get in the best shape of your life? Learn more by visiting irontribefitness.com.

Work-based learning benefits potential employees and employers

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed)

Our unemployment rate is at a record low. Each month, we see reports that more and more people are gaining entry into the labor force. This is great for all Alabamians and our economy.

While this benefits our state as a whole, it can be challenging for businesses to find qualified employees. Many managers and business owners are searching for new ways to attract and retain those they need to keep their companies running at optimum staffing levels. At the same time, some potential employees are having a difficult time finding work because they need to upgrade their skill set.

One option available is the Work Based Learning (WBL) initiative offered via the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act. This is a federally-funded program designed to help individuals find good jobs and stay employed while unifying and enhancing the state’s employment, education and training programs. It is led by a regional board and is a partner entity of the Alabama Workforce Council.

345

Via WBL, young adults meeting certain requirements can receive valuable experience with companies that register to be a WBL job site. The goal is to promote the development of an individual’s good work habits and basic work skills by participating in a structured, paid, work-based learning activity.

Some of the WBL objectives include laying the foundation for sound at-work habits through meaningful assignments and improving the participant’s occupational and other basic skills through worksite experience. The WBL participant is under close supervision for the duration of the program.

After completion of the WBL program, participants can expect to have a better understanding of future employment or training options. Each person’s WBL activities are carefully reviewed to ensure that the expected goals and objectives are met.

Employers who choose to be a host site for a WBL program will reap the benefits of creating their own workforce pipeline without incurring the expenses of the participant’s wages. An employer gets to try out participants for employment for up to 390 hours free of charge. At the end of the 390 hours, if the employer wants to offer permanent employment to the participant, then the employer has the option to enroll the participant in On-the-Job Training for up to an additional 600 hours.

The On-the-Job Training program gives the participant an opportunity to learn additional job skills and specific duties required by that employer. Under OJT, employers are reimbursed for up to 50% of the participant’s hourly wages for the duration of the training period.

Work Based Learning provides a win-win-win for everyone involved. Participants gain valuable experience in employment, while employers get to know potential employees. Alabama benefits by gaining experienced workers.  WBL is also a component in achieving Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus goal of adding 500,000 credentialed/degreed individuals to the state’s workforce by 2025.

WBL and OJT are just two of the many training opportunities available for people of all ages and backgrounds that also offer a benefit component for businesses. To learn more, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Phee Friend is board coordinator of the Governor’s Local Workforce Areas Workforce Development Division.

Work-based learning benefits potential employees and employers

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed)

Our unemployment rate is at a record low. Each month, we see reports that more and more people are gaining entry into the labor force. This is great for all Alabamians and our economy.

While this benefits our state as a whole, it can be challenging for businesses to find qualified employees. Many managers and business owners are searching for new ways to attract and retain those they need to keep their companies running at optimum staffing levels. At the same time, some potential employees are having a difficult time finding work because they need to upgrade their skill set.

One option available is the Work Based Learning (WBL) initiative offered via the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act. This is a federally-funded program designed to help individuals find good jobs and stay employed while unifying and enhancing the state’s employment, education and training programs. It is led by a regional board and is a partner entity of the Alabama Workforce Council.

345

Via WBL, young adults meeting certain requirements can receive valuable experience with companies that register to be a WBL job site. The goal is to promote the development of an individual’s good work habits and basic work skills by participating in a structured, paid, work-based learning activity.

Some of the WBL objectives include laying the foundation for sound at-work habits through meaningful assignments and improving the participant’s occupational and other basic skills through worksite experience. The WBL participant is under close supervision for the duration of the program.

After completion of the WBL program, participants can expect to have a better understanding of future employment or training options. Each person’s WBL activities are carefully reviewed to ensure that the expected goals and objectives are met.

Employers who choose to be a host site for a WBL program will reap the benefits of creating their own workforce pipeline without incurring the expenses of the participant’s wages. An employer gets to try out participants for employment for up to 390 hours free of charge. At the end of the 390 hours, if the employer wants to offer permanent employment to the participant, then the employer has the option to enroll the participant in On-the-Job Training for up to an additional 600 hours.

The On-the-Job Training program gives the participant an opportunity to learn additional job skills and specific duties required by that employer. Under OJT, employers are reimbursed for up to 50% of the participant’s hourly wages for the duration of the training period.

Work Based Learning provides a win-win-win for everyone involved. Participants gain valuable experience in employment, while employers get to know potential employees. Alabama benefits by gaining experienced workers.  WBL is also a component in achieving Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus goal of adding 500,000 credentialed/degreed individuals to the state’s workforce by 2025.

WBL and OJT are just two of the many training opportunities available for people of all ages and backgrounds that also offer a benefit component for businesses. To learn more, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Phee Friend is board coordinator of the Governor’s Local Workforce Areas Workforce Development Division.

 

 

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

Work-based learning benefits potential employees and employers

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed)

Our unemployment rate is at a record low. Each month, we see reports that more and more people are gaining entry into the labor force. This is great for all Alabamians and our economy.

While this benefits our state as a whole, it can be challenging for businesses to find qualified employees. Many managers and business owners are searching for new ways to attract and retain those they need to keep their companies running at optimum staffing levels. At the same time, some potential employees are having a difficult time finding work because they need to upgrade their skill set.

One option available is the Work Based Learning (WBL) initiative offered via the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act. This is a federally-funded program designed to help individuals find good jobs and stay employed, while unifying and enhancing the state’s employment, education and training programs. It is led by a regional board and is a partner entity of the Alabama Workforce Council.

345

Via WBL, young adults meeting certain requirements can receive valuable experience with companies that register to be a WBL job site. The goal is to promote the development of an individual’s good work habits and basic work skills by participating in a structured, paid, work-based learning activity.

Some of the WBL objectives include laying the foundation for sound at-work habits through meaningful assignments and improving the participant’s occupational and other basic skills through worksite experience. The WBL participant is under close supervision for the duration of the program.

After completion of the WBL program, participants can expect to have a better understanding of future employment or training options. Each person’s WBL activities are carefully reviewed to ensure that the expected goals and objectives are met.

Employers who choose to be a host site for a WBL program will reap the benefits of creating their own workforce pipeline without incurring the expenses of the participant’s wages. An employer gets to try out participants for employment for up to 390 hours free of charge. At the end of the 390 hours, if the employer wants to offer permanent employment to the participant, then the employer has the option to enroll the participant in On-the-Job Training for up to an additional 600 hours.

The On-the-Job Training program gives the participant an opportunity to learn additional job skills and specific duties required by that employer. Under OJT, employers are reimbursed for up to 50% of the participant’s hourly wages for the duration of the training period.

Work Based Learning provides a win-win-win for everyone involved. Participants gain valuable experience in employment, while employers get to know potential employees. Alabama benefits by gaining experienced workers.  WBL is also a component in achieving Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus goal of adding 500,000 credentialed/degreed individuals to the state’s workforce by 2025.

WBL and OJT are just two of the many training opportunities available for people of all ages and backgrounds that also offer a benefit component for businesses. To learn more, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Phee Friend is board coordinator of the Governor’s Local Workforce Areas Workforce Development Division.

 

 

Work-based learning benefits potential employees and employers

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed)

Our unemployment rate is at a record low. Each month, we see reports that more and more people are gaining entry into the labor force. This is great for all Alabamians and our economy.

While this benefits our state as a whole, it can be challenging for businesses to find qualified employees. Many managers and business owners are searching for new ways to attract and retain those they need to keep their companies running at optimum staffing levels. At the same time, some potential employees are having a difficult time finding work because they need to upgrade their skill set.

One option available is the Work Based Learning (WBL) initiative offered via the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act. This is a federally-funded program designed to help individuals find good jobs and stay employed, while unifying and enhancing the state’s employment, education and training programs. It is led by a regional board and is a partner entity of the Alabama Workforce Council.

345

Via WBL, young adults meeting certain requirements can receive valuable experience with companies that register to be a WBL job site. The goal is to promote the development of an individual’s good work habits and basic work skills by participating in a structured, paid, work-based learning activity.

Some of the WBL objectives include laying the foundation for sound at-work habits through meaningful assignments and improving the participant’s occupational and other basic skills through worksite experience. The WBL participant is under close supervision for the duration of the program.

After completion of the WBL program, participants can expect to have a better understanding of future employment or training options. Each person’s WBL activities are carefully reviewed to ensure that the expected goals and objectives are met.

Employers who choose to be a host site for a WBL program will reap the benefits of creating their own workforce pipeline without incurring the expenses of the participant’s wages. An employer gets to try out participants for employment for up to 390 hours free of charge. At the end of the 390 hours, if the employer wants to offer permanent employment to the participant, then the employer has the option to enroll the participant in On-the-Job Training for up to an additional 600 hours.

The On-the-Job Training program gives the participant an opportunity to learn additional job skills and specific duties required by that employer. Under OJT, employers are reimbursed for up to 50% of the participant’s hourly wages for the duration of the training period.

Work Based Learning provides a win-win-win for everyone involved. Participants gain valuable experience in employment, while employers get to know potential employees. Alabama benefits by gaining experienced workers.  WBL is also a component in achieving Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus goal of adding 500,000 credentialed/degreed individuals to the state’s workforce by 2025.

WBL and OJT are just two of the many training opportunities available for people of all ages and backgrounds that also offer a benefit component for businesses. To learn more, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Phee Friend is board coordinator of the Governor’s Local Workforce Areas Workforce Development Division.

 

 

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

Vocational rehabilitation services strives to narrow employment gap for Alabamians with disabilities

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed, YHN)

By Jane Elizabeth Burdeshaw, commissioner
Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services

“What do you do for a living?”

We’ve all asked or been asked that question.

It’s a great conversation starter that helps us learn more about a person. It also underscores our society’s emphasis on the value of having an occupation.

469

The question is no less important to a person with a disability.

For people with disabilities, employment is about much more than having a job. It is the great equalizer. Working empowers people with disabilities by giving them the means to live independently and to contribute to and participate in their communities.

And yet, employment for people with disabilities lags far behind employment for people who do not have disabilities. In Alabama, the employment rate for individuals with disabilities is a meager 27.5% representing a 45.5 percentage point gap when compared to individuals without disabilities (source: Respect Ability).

Working in tandem with our community partners, other state agencies, and the Alabama Workforce Council, Alabama’s Vocational Rehabilitation Service is striving to narrow that gap through specialized employment- and education-related services that assist people with disabilities in finding and maintaining employment. VRS’ customized services and expertise make employment a reality even for individuals with significant disabilities.

In fiscal year 2018, VRS assisted almost 3,500 Alabamians with disabilities in finding employment, including 482 with the most-significant disabilities.

Of course, that accomplishment would not be possible without willing employers.

Oftentimes, business owners are reluctant to hire people with disabilities because of misconceptions related to job performance, reliability, and cost as well as a lack of familiarity with the resources that are available to ensure a worker’s success on the job.

In reality, though, hiring people with disabilities makes good business sense. The proof is in the results, and it has been my experience that one successful placement with an employer “kicks open” the door to future job opportunities for other workers with disabilities. It’s a win-win scenario: The employer gains a loyal worker and benefits from a more-diverse and inclusive workplace, while the employee gains and benefits from the satisfaction that comes from having a job.

Through the VRS Business Relations Program, employers have access to disability experts who provide no-cost services such as job analysis; recruiting; pre-hire screening; job-site training; post-hire follow-up; disability management; and employer training on such topics as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the medical aspects of disability, the reasonable accommodations process, and disability awareness and etiquette. VRS business relations consultants also offer employers information on financial incentives, pre-hire work experiences, and on-the-job training reimbursements.

VRS is proud to be contributing to Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus program through the various services and supports we provide to job-seekers, workers and employers. Specifically, we see VRS as critical to improving work opportunities for a population that faces significant barriers to employment.

As we strive to achieve the goals of the Success Plus initiative, we are working diligently to assure that people with disabilities are included and prepared to join other Alabamians in experiencing the gratification and fulfillment of gainful employment.

For more information about VRS and its services and programs, call 1-800-441-7607. To learn more about AlabamaWorks, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

Vocational rehabilitation services strives to narrow employment gap for Alabamians with disabilities

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed, YHN)

By Jane Elizabeth Burdeshaw, commissioner
Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services

“What do you do for a living?”

We’ve all asked or been asked that question.

It’s a great conversation starter that helps us learn more about a person. It also underscores our society’s emphasis on the value of having an occupation.

469

The question is no less important to a person with a disability.

For people with disabilities, employment is about much more than having a job. It is the great equalizer. Working empowers people with disabilities by giving them the means to live independently and to contribute to and participate in their communities.

And yet, employment for people with disabilities lags far behind employment for people who do not have disabilities. In Alabama, the employment rate for individuals with disabilities is a meager 27.5% representing a 45.5 percentage point gap when compared to individuals without disabilities (source: Respect Ability).

Working in tandem with our community partners, other state agencies, and the Alabama Workforce Council, Alabama’s Vocational Rehabilitation Service is striving to narrow that gap through specialized employment- and education-related services that assist people with disabilities in finding and maintaining employment. VRS’ customized services and expertise make employment a reality even for individuals with significant disabilities.

In fiscal year 2018, VRS assisted almost 3,500 Alabamians with disabilities in finding employment, including 482 with the most-significant disabilities.

Of course, that accomplishment would not be possible without willing employers.

Oftentimes, business owners are reluctant to hire people with disabilities because of misconceptions related to job performance, reliability, and cost as well as a lack of familiarity with the resources that are available to ensure a worker’s success on the job.

In reality, though, hiring people with disabilities makes good business sense. The proof is in the results, and it has been my experience that one successful placement with an employer “kicks open” the door to future job opportunities for other workers with disabilities. It’s a win-win scenario: The employer gains a loyal worker and benefits from a more-diverse and inclusive workplace, while the employee gains and benefits from the satisfaction that comes from having a job.

Through the VRS Business Relations Program, employers have access to disability experts who provide no-cost services such as job analysis; recruiting; pre-hire screening; job-site training; post-hire follow-up; disability management; and employer training on such topics as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the medical aspects of disability, the reasonable accommodations process, and disability awareness and etiquette. VRS business relations consultants also offer employers information on financial incentives, pre-hire work experiences, and on-the-job training reimbursements.

VRS is proud to be contributing to Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus program through the various services and supports we provide to job-seekers, workers and employers. Specifically, we see VRS as critical to improving work opportunities for a population that faces significant barriers to employment.

As we strive to achieve the goals of the Success Plus initiative, we are working diligently to assure that people with disabilities are included and prepared to join other Alabamians in experiencing the gratification and fulfillment of gainful employment.

For more information about VRS and its services and programs, call 1-800-441-7607. To learn more about AlabamaWorks, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

Vocational rehabilitation services strives to narrow employment gap for Alabamians with disabilities

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed, YHN)

By Jane Elizabeth Burdeshaw, commissioner
Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services

“What do you do for a living?”

We’ve all asked or been asked that question.

It’s a great conversation starter that helps us learn more about a person. It also underscores our society’s emphasis on the value of having an occupation.

469

The question is no less important to a person with a disability.

For people with disabilities, employment is about much more than having a job. It is the great equalizer. Working empowers people with disabilities by giving them the means to live independently and to contribute to and participate in their communities.

And yet, employment for people with disabilities lags far behind employment for people who do not have disabilities. In Alabama, the employment rate for individuals with disabilities is a meager 27.5% representing a 45.5 percentage point gap when compared to individuals without disabilities (source: Respect Ability).

Working in tandem with our community partners, other state agencies, and the Alabama Workforce Council, Alabama’s Vocational Rehabilitation Service is striving to narrow that gap through specialized employment- and education-related services that assist people with disabilities in finding and maintaining employment. VRS’ customized services and expertise make employment a reality even for individuals with significant disabilities.

In fiscal year 2018, VRS assisted almost 3,500 Alabamians with disabilities in finding employment, including 482 with the most-significant disabilities.

Of course, that accomplishment would not be possible without willing employers.

Oftentimes, business owners are reluctant to hire people with disabilities because of misconceptions related to job performance, reliability, and cost as well as a lack of familiarity with the resources that are available to ensure a worker’s success on the job.

In reality, though, hiring people with disabilities makes good business sense. The proof is in the results, and it has been my experience that one successful placement with an employer “kicks open” the door to future job opportunities for other workers with disabilities. It’s a win-win scenario: The employer gains a loyal worker and benefits from a more-diverse and inclusive workplace, while the employee gains and benefits from the satisfaction that comes from having a job.

Through the VRS Business Relations Program, employers have access to disability experts who provide no-cost services such as job analysis; recruiting; pre-hire screening; job-site training; post-hire follow-up; disability management; and employer training on such topics as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the medical aspects of disability, the reasonable accommodations process, and disability awareness and etiquette. VRS business relations consultants also offer employers information on financial incentives, pre-hire work experiences, and on-the-job training reimbursements.

VRS is proud to be contributing to Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus program through the various services and supports we provide to job-seekers, workers and employers. Specifically, we see VRS as critical to improving work opportunities for a population that faces significant barriers to employment.

As we strive to achieve the goals of the Success Plus initiative, we are working diligently to assure that people with disabilities are included and prepared to join other Alabamians in experiencing the gratification and fulfillment of gainful employment.

For more information about VRS and its services and programs, call 1-800-441-7607. To learn more about AlabamaWorks, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

Vocational rehabilitation services strives to narrow employment gap for Alabamians with disabilities

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed, YHN)

By Jane Elizabeth Burdeshaw, commissioner
Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services

“What do you do for a living?”

We’ve all asked or been asked that question.

It’s a great conversation starter that helps us learn more about a person. It also underscores our society’s emphasis on the value of having an occupation.

469

The question is no less important to a person with a disability.

For people with disabilities, employment is about much more than having a job. It is the great equalizer. Working empowers people with disabilities by giving them the means to live independently and to contribute to and participate in their communities.

And yet, employment for people with disabilities lags far behind employment for people who do not have disabilities. In Alabama, the employment rate for individuals with disabilities is a meager 27.5% representing a 45.5 percentage point gap when compared to individuals without disabilities (source: Respect Ability).

Working in tandem with our community partners, other state agencies, and the Alabama Workforce Council, Alabama’s Vocational Rehabilitation Service is striving to narrow that gap through specialized employment- and education-related services that assist people with disabilities in finding and maintaining employment. VRS’ customized services and expertise make employment a reality even for individuals with significant disabilities.

In fiscal year 2018, VRS assisted almost 3,500 Alabamians with disabilities in finding employment, including 482 with the most-significant disabilities.

Of course, that accomplishment would not be possible without willing employers.

Oftentimes, business owners are reluctant to hire people with disabilities because of misconceptions related to job performance, reliability, and cost as well as a lack of familiarity with the resources that are available to ensure a worker’s success on the job.

In reality, though, hiring people with disabilities makes good business sense. The proof is in the results, and it has been my experience that one successful placement with an employer “kicks open” the door to future job opportunities for other workers with disabilities. It’s a win-win scenario: The employer gains a loyal worker and benefits from a more-diverse and inclusive workplace, while the employee gains and benefits from the satisfaction that comes from having a job.

Through the VRS Business Relations Program, employers have access to disability experts who provide no-cost services such as job analysis; recruiting; pre-hire screening; job-site training; post-hire follow-up; disability management; and employer training on such topics as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the medical aspects of disability, the reasonable accommodations process, and disability awareness and etiquette. VRS business relations consultants also offer employers information on financial incentives, pre-hire work experiences, and on-the-job training reimbursements.

VRS is proud to be contributing to Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus program through the various services and supports we provide to job-seekers, workers and employers. Specifically, we see VRS as critical to improving work opportunities for a population that faces significant barriers to employment.

As we strive to achieve the goals of the Success Plus initiative, we are working diligently to assure that people with disabilities are included and prepared to join other Alabamians in experiencing the gratification and fulfillment of gainful employment.

For more information about VRS and its services and programs, call 1-800-441-7607. To learn more about AlabamaWorks, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

Vocational rehabilitation services strives to narrow employment gap for Alabamians with disabilities

(AlabamaWorks! Success Plus/Contributed, YHN)

By Jane Elizabeth Burdeshaw, commissioner
Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services

“What do you do for a living?”

We’ve all asked or been asked that question.

It’s a great conversation starter that helps us learn more about a person. It also underscores our society’s emphasis on the value of having an occupation.

469

The question is no less important to a person with a disability.

For people with disabilities, employment is about much more than having a job. It is the great equalizer. Working empowers people with disabilities by giving them the means to live independently and to contribute to and participate in their communities.

And yet, employment for people with disabilities lags far behind employment for people who do not have disabilities. In Alabama, the employment rate for individuals with disabilities is a meager 27.5% representing a 45.5 percentage point gap when compared to individuals without disabilities (source: Respect Ability).

Working in tandem with our community partners, other state agencies, and the Alabama Workforce Council, Alabama’s Vocational Rehabilitation Service is striving to narrow that gap through specialized employment- and education-related services that assist people with disabilities in finding and maintaining employment. VRS’ customized services and expertise make employment a reality even for individuals with significant disabilities.

In fiscal year 2018, VRS assisted almost 3,500 Alabamians with disabilities in finding employment, including 482 with the most-significant disabilities.

Of course, that accomplishment would not be possible without willing employers.

Oftentimes, business owners are reluctant to hire people with disabilities because of misconceptions related to job performance, reliability, and cost as well as a lack of familiarity with the resources that are available to ensure a worker’s success on the job.

In reality, though, hiring people with disabilities makes good business sense. The proof is in the results, and it has been my experience that one successful placement with an employer “kicks open” the door to future job opportunities for other workers with disabilities. It’s a win-win scenario: The employer gains a loyal worker and benefits from a more-diverse and inclusive workplace, while the employee gains and benefits from the satisfaction that comes from having a job.

Through the VRS Business Relations Program, employers have access to disability experts who provide no-cost services such as job analysis; recruiting; pre-hire screening; job-site training; post-hire follow-up; disability management; and employer training on such topics as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the medical aspects of disability, the reasonable accommodations process, and disability awareness and etiquette. VRS business relations consultants also offer employers information on financial incentives, pre-hire work experiences, and on-the-job training reimbursements.

VRS is proud to be contributing to Gov. Kay Ivey’s AlabamaWorks Success Plus program through the various services and supports we provide to job-seekers, workers and employers. Specifically, we see VRS as critical to improving work opportunities for a population that faces significant barriers to employment.

As we strive to achieve the goals of the Success Plus initiative, we are working diligently to assure that people with disabilities are included and prepared to join other Alabamians in experiencing the gratification and fulfillment of gainful employment.

For more information about VRS and its services and programs, call 1-800-441-7607. To learn more about AlabamaWorks, visit www.alabamaworks.com.

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

A Story Worth Sharing: The Birmingham Zoo’s Passionate Mission to Inspire Wildlife Conservation

(The Birmingham Zoo/Contributed, Serquest, YHN)

With 700 animals and a beautiful lush landscape just minutes away from downtown, it’s easy to see why the Birmingham Zoo is one of Alabama’s most well-loved attractions. While the zoo serves as a fun experience for visitors, many may not know it doubles as a nonprofit, focusing on local, and global wildlife conservation efforts.

Terra Manasco, the Birmingham Zoo’s Conservation and Special Projects Manager says the zoo’s nonprofit status helps to further their primary mission, Inspiring Passion to Conserve the Natural World.

Manasco says this mission aligns with the goals of other conservation nongovernmental organizations as well as a variety of state and federal conservation agencies.

“Our status as a not-for-profit has a positive impact on our relationships with our local and global partners, assuring these partners that the zoo is a mission-driven organization dedicated to conservation,” Mansaco said.

One of these local partnerships is with the Alabama Department of Conservation’s Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division. The Birmingham Zoo closely works with the AWFF to further both of the organizations’ missions in practical ways. From signage and messaging on zoo grounds to sending their staff on field research missions with AWFF staff, the zoo aims to increase the public’s awareness of Alabama’s astounding biological diversity and work to conserve the state’s rich natural heritage.

“We have many cooperative conservation projects with AWFF, including projects that benefit American Black Bears, Golden Eagles, Gopher Tortoises, Eastern Indigo Snakes and more,” Manasco stated.

Additionally, the zoo often has the opportunity to work with universities and municipalities, extending their reach into a variety of statewide initiatives focusing on animal and land conservation.

Samil Baker, the Birmingham Zoo’s Manager of Public Relations and Social Media, says the zoo is both a fun and educational experience for all who visit.

“We continue to be a place for families to gather and create lasting memories while engaging with the natural world around them,” Baker said

Manasco echoed Baker’s comments when she stated that the zoo takes their commitment to their mission and hopefully “inspires a conservation ethic in our guests as well.”

In addition to their ongoing conservation efforts, Baker says the Birmingham Zoo is in the process of updating and renewing their facilities. The zoo is entering the second phase of their Renew the Zoo Capital Campaign.

Baker says that phase two includes, “the front entrance Arrival Experience, a large gift shop, membership office, the Hugh Kaul Plaza, the Altec/Styslinger Learning Center, a sensory room, first aid station, modern restrooms, administrative offices, overlook decks and event rental spaces.”

The zoo is set to host a grand opening celebration for the New Arrival Experience and Welcome Plaza on Saturday, June 29 from 9am until 6pm.

For more details about this event or other zoo happenings visit the Birmingham Zoo’s website at birminghamzoo.com or Facebook page @BirminghamZoo.

1

A ‘Story Worth Sharing’: Yellowhammer News and Serquest partner to award monthly grants to Alabama nonprofits

(Serquest, YHN)

Christmas is the season of giving, helping others and finding magic moments among seemingly ordinary (and occasionally dreary) days. What better way to welcome this season than to share what Alabamians are doing to help others?

Yellowhammer News and Serquest are partnering to bring you, “A Story Worth Sharing,” a monthly award given to an Alabama based nonprofit actively making an impact through their mission. Each month, the winning organization will receive a $1,000 grant from Serquest and promotion across the Yellowhammer Multimedia platforms.

Yellowhammer and Serquest are looking for nonprofits that go above and beyond to change lives and make a difference in their communities.

Already have a nonprofit in mind to nominate? Great!

Get started here with contest guidelines and a link to submit your nomination:

125

Nominations are now open and applicants only need to be nominated once. All non-winning nominations will automatically be eligible for selection in subsequent months. Monthly winners will be announced via a feature story that will be shared and promoted on Yellowhammer’s website, email and social media platforms.

Submit your nomination here.

Our organizations look forward to sharing these heartwarming and positive stories with you over the next few months as we highlight the good works of nonprofits throughout our state.

Serquest is an Alabama based software company founded by Hammond Cobb, IV of Montgomery. The organization sees itself as, “Digital road and bridge builders in the nonprofit sector to help people get where they want to go faster, life’s purpose can’t wait.”

Learn more about Serquest here.

A Story Worth Sharing: The Birmingham Zoo’s passionate mission to inspire wildlife conservation

(The Birmingham Zoo/Contributed, Serquest, YHN)

With 700 animals and a beautiful lush landscape just minutes away from downtown, it’s easy to see why the Birmingham Zoo is one of Alabama’s most well-loved attractions. While the zoo serves as a fun experience for visitors, many may not know it doubles as a nonprofit focusing on local and global wildlife conservation efforts.

Terra Manasco, the Birmingham Zoo’s Conservation and Special Projects manager, says the zoo’s nonprofit status helps to further their primary mission: Inspiring Passion to Conserve the Natural World.

382

Manasco says this mission aligns with the goals of other conservation nongovernmental organizations as well as a variety of state and federal conservation agencies.

“Our status as a not-for-profit has a positive impact on our relationships with our local and global partners, assuring these partners that the zoo is a mission-driven organization dedicated to conservation,” Manasco said.

One of these local partnerships is with the Alabama Department of Conservation’s Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division. The Birmingham Zoo closely works with the AWFF to further both of the organizations’ missions in practical ways. From signage and messaging on zoo grounds to sending their staff on field research missions with AWFF staff, the zoo aims to increase the public’s awareness of Alabama’s astounding biological diversity and work to conserve the state’s rich natural heritage.

“We have many cooperative conservation projects with AWFF, including projects that benefit American Black Bears, Golden Eagles, Gopher Tortoises, Eastern Indigo Snakes and more,” Manasco stated.

Additionally, the zoo often has the opportunity to work with universities and municipalities, extending their reach into a variety of statewide initiatives focusing on animal and land conservation.

Samil Baker, the Birmingham Zoo’s manager of Public Relations and Social Media, says the zoo is both a fun and educational experience for all who visit.

“We continue to be a place for families to gather and create lasting memories while engaging with the natural world around them,” Baker said

Manasco echoed Baker’s comments when she stated that the zoo takes their commitment to their mission and hopefully “inspires a conservation ethic in our guests as well.”

In addition to their ongoing conservation efforts, Baker says the Birmingham Zoo is in the process of updating and renewing their facilities. The zoo is entering the second phase of their Renew the Zoo Capital Campaign.

Baker says that phase two includes, “the front entrance Arrival Experience, a large gift shop, membership office, the Hugh Kaul Plaza, the Altec/Styslinger Learning Center, a sensory room, first aid station, modern restrooms, administrative offices, overlook decks and event rental spaces.”

The zoo is set to host a grand opening celebration for the New Arrival Experience and Welcome Plaza on Saturday, June 29 from 9:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.

For more details about this event or other zoo happenings visit the Birmingham Zoo’s website at birminghamzoo.com or Facebook page @BirminghamZoo.