4 months ago

Byrne campaign announces 67-county leadership team

U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne (AL-01) has announced the launch of his U.S. Senate campaign’s grassroots leadership team, which covers all 67 counties and includes “200 key community leaders,” according to a Monday press release.

“It is an honor to have so many people from every corner of the state joining us in the fight to bring our Alabama values to the U.S. Senate,” Byrne said in a statement. “We are going to win this primary and defeat Doug Jones thanks to this team of homegrown supporters.”

“Bradley was the first candidate to announce financial contributions from all 67 counties and is now the first candidate to announce a full 67 county leadership team. The people of Alabama are ready for a Christian, conservative fighter, and they know Bradley is the man for the job,” added Byrne’s campaign manager, Seth Morrow.

Morrow further noted, “We are committed to an Alabama grassroots campaign that is built to last, and the Grassroots Leadership Team marks yet another milestone for our campaign.”

The announcement said members of the grassroots leadership team will “serve as coordinators in their community and help with an assortment of tasks ranging from hosting meet and greets to distributing yard signs.”

Members of the grassroots leadership team as follows:

Senator Greg Albritton – Escambia County
Francis Andrews – Limestone County
Harold Appling – Tuscaloosa County
Greg Atkinson – Talladega County
JoAnn Averett – Chilton County
Loretta Bach – Montgomery County
Richard Baker – Marshall County
Donna Baker – Walker County
Representative Mike Ball – Madison County
Peggy Bamberg – Montgomery County
Mayor Ed Beasley – Crenshaw County
Bradley Bedwell – Houston County
Ann Priester Bennett – Lee County
Curt Bigbee – Franklin County
John Blue – Madison County
Ron Bolton – Tuscaloosa County
Traci Bowden – Marshall County
Billy Bowden – Marshall County
Jen Boyles – Russell County
Will Boyles – Russell County
Mayor David Bradford – Colbert County
Duwayne Bridges – Chambers County
Trey Brinkley – Etowah County
Representative Chip Brown – Mobile County
Dicksie Bush – Calhoun County
Emily Butler – Colbert County
Senator Tom Butler – Madison County
Kirkland Byars – Tuscaloosa County
David Byers – Jefferson County
Tom Cain – Randolph County
Sharon Cain – Randolph County
Jim Cary – Marshall County
Bill Castlen – Houston County
Frances Castlen – Houston County
Kenny Childree – Bullock County
Sheriff Sam Cochran – Mobile County
Bo Colley – Chambers County
Representative Terri Collins – Morgan County
Bruce Cooke – Sumter County
Mayor Jenny Countryman – Monroe County
Dylan Cox – Mobile County
Bill Crain – Madison County
Daniel Craven – Baldwin County
Ashton Crihfield – Lauderdale County
Belinda Crouch – Washington County
Donna Cude – Jefferson County
Rex Davis – Limestone County
John Dawson – Etowah County
Bart Dawson – St. Clair County
Mayor Sheldon Day – Clarke County
Mary Martha Defoor – Montgomery County
Grant DeMuth – Marshall County
Celia Dixon – Elmore County
Charla Doucet – Chilton County
Emily Durden – Montgomery County
Mason Dyess – Tuscaloosa County
Representative Brett Easterbrook- Washington County
Steve Edwards – Colbert County
Tracey Edwards – Elmore County
Gary Edwards – Elmore County
Don Edwards – Lee County
Gayle Edwards – Lee County
Senator Chris Elliott – Baldwin County
Bo Evans – Autauga County
Punkin Evans – Autauga County
Kathy Evans – Autauga County
Bradfield Evans – Lowndes County
Representative David Faulkner – Jefferson County
Representative Joe Faust – Baldwin County
Troy Fillingim – Henry County
Don Fisher – Montgomery County
Karen Fisher – Montgomery County
Katie Foster – Colbert County
Judy Fraser – Shelby County
Joe Fuller – Jefferson County
Vickie Fuller – Jefferson County
Representative Victor Gaston – Mobile County
Greg Gagliano – Shelby County
Kim Gagliano – Shelby County
Darren Garner – Macon County
James Gilliland Sr. – Coosa County
Joe Glass – Calhoun County
Kim Glass – Calhoun County
Logan Glass – Etowah County
Marvin Gregory – Tuscaloosa County
Art Hahn – Tallapoosa County
Commissioner Robert Ham – Lee County
Mayor Johnny Hammock – Tallapoosa County
Charles Hardage – Chambers County
Don Harris – Montgomery County
Howard Harrison – Coffee County
Grady Hartzog – Barbour County
Wesley Helton – Shelby County
Davis Henry – Dallas County
Rod Herring – Lee County
Karen Herring – Lee County
Steve Hicks – Cherokee County
Steve Hicks – Lauderdale County
David Hogan – Jefferson County
Kevin Holland – Escambia County
Leslie Hollingsworth – Shelby County
Webb Holmes – Perry County
Mayor Steve Holt – Lauderdale County
Cheryl Holt – Shelby County
Gene Howard – Calhoun County
Virginia Howard – Dale County
Kent Howard – Jefferson County
Carlton Hunley – Lee County
Will Hurts – Lawrence County
Sheriff Heath Jackson – Escambia County
Senator Andrew Jones – Cherokee County
Lisa Jones – Marshall County
Meador Jones – Hale County
Laura Joseph – Shelby County
Mark Kaiser – Baldwin County
Michael Keller – Winston County
Cody Kruse – Montgomery County
Steve Langley – Marion County
Bubba Lee – Baldwin County
Nick Lee – St. Clair County
Shag LaPrade – Coffee County
Senator Steve Livingston – Jackson County
Chris Live – Houston County
Mark Long – DeKalb County
Barney Lovelace – Morgan County
Jack Lovelady – Jackson County
Nikki Lovelady – Lawrence County
Margarett Lovett – Colbert County
Sheriff Hoss Mack – Baldwin County
Grady Martin – Choctaw County
Kirk Mattei – Mobile County
Ray McCarty – Pickens County
Mary Sue McClurkin – Shelby County
Van McClurkin – Shelby County
Colin McGuire – Butler County
Suzanne McKee – Marengo County
Robert McKee – Marengo County
Representative Steve McMillan – Baldwin County
Tom McMillan – Escambia County
Stephen McNair – Mobile County
Austin Monk – Cullman County
Pam Segars-Morris – Jefferson County
Will Morris – St. Clair County
Mayor Charles Murphy – Baldwin County
Jim Murphy – Blount County
Jason Neff – Tuscaloosa County
Sue Neuwien – Coffee County
Brown Nolen – Lauderdale County
Baylie Norton – Cleburne County
Jeff Overstreet – Etowah County
Summer Overstreet – Etowah County
Mike Parsons – Madison County
Brooks Payne – Tuscaloosa County
Captain Hal Pierce – Mobile County
Renee Powers – Chilton County
Tom Powers – Chilton County
Barbara L. Priester – Lee County
Cathy Quin – Tuscaloosa County
Charlie Ramsey – Monroe County
Rhonda Reynolds – Chilton County
Representative Kerry Rich – Marshall County
Elaine Ridenour – Dale County
Pete Riehm – Mobile County
Glenda Reitzell – Madison County
Colonel John Rietzell – Madison County
John Roberts – Madison County
Salem Saloom – Conecuh County
Daniel Sawyer – Monroe County
Deb Sellers – Jefferson County
John Sellers – Jefferson County
Art Sessions – Mobile County
Senator David Sessions – Mobile County
Greg Shirley – Talladega County
Representative Harry Shriver – Baldwin County
Kara Silvers – Lee County
Representative Matt Simpson – Baldwin County
Sheriff Rick Singleton – Lauderdale County
Stephanie Smith – Jefferson County
Eddie Smith – Lee County
Mike Sparks – Clay County
Alyce Spruell – Tuscaloosa County
Zach Stanton – Tuscaloosa County
David Steele – Mobile County
Jack Steele – Wilcox County
Kermit Marcus Stephens III – Bibb County
Karen Stewart – Elmore County
Sally French Stewart – Jefferson County
Representative Shane Stringer – Mobile County
Sam Stroud – Pike County
Mayor Bernie Sullivan – Crenshaw County
Sam Taylor – Lamar County
Lt. Col. Jim Terrell – Madison County
Jeff Thagard – Dale County
Robin Thagard – Dale County
Charlie Thompson – Lauderdale County
Steven Thornton – Madison County
Don Waldon – Fayette County
James Walker – Lauderdale County
Tim Walker – Marshall County
Jessie Weeks – Geneva County
Mikel Weeks – Geneva County
Honorable Tracie West — Lee County
Hugh Wheeless – Houston County
Chairman Greg White – Covington County
Representative Andy Whitt – Madison County
Representative Margie Wilcox – Mobile County
Senator Jack Williams – Mobile County
John Willis – Franklin County
Mayor Bob Wills – Baldwin County
Joann Wilmore – Autauga County
Don Woods – Greene County
Honorable David Yarber – Colbert County

Kyle Morris also contributes daily to Breitbart News. You can follow him on Twitter @RealKyleMorris.

1 hour ago

Watch: Republican Women of Huntsville’s U.S. Senate candidate forum

On Tuesday, the Republican Women of Huntsville hosted a U.S. Senate candidates forum at the Huntsville Botanical Gardens.

The forum featured former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-Fairhope), former Auburn head football coach Tommy Tuberville and State Rep. Arnold Mooney (R-Indian Springs). It was moderated by Yellowhammer News’ Jeff Poor.

The candidates were given two minutes to open, followed by questions regarding various topics including trade, foreign policy, marijuana, debts and deficits, term limits and abortion with minute-and-a-half responses, and a two-minute close.

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Video stream courtesy of Alabama Straw Poll:

2 hours ago

Byrne: ‘Would be surprised’ if Trump doesn’t comment on Senate race; Sessions should have resigned AG post if he thought recusal was necessary

On Tuesday, U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-Fairhope) said former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, one of his opponents vying for the Republican nomination for Alabama’s U.S. Senate election in November, was fair game regarding his stint as the nation’s top law enforcement officer in the Trump administration.

In a wide-ranging interview with Huntsville radio’s WVNN, Byrne explained that although President Donald Trump has largely remained publicly quiet about their U.S. Senate race, he anticipates Trump will eventually reveal his feelings on the contest and about Sessions.

“I would be surprised if he doesn’t,” Byrne said on “The Jeff Poor Show.” “Every time I’m with him, he wants to talk about the Senate race in Alabama. Even when we’re in a big group of people, he wants to talk about it. He’s paying very close attention. He cares a lot. He cares about Alabama, number one. But he’s got some really hard feelings about Jeff [Sessions]. He really does. Even if he doesn’t say another word, take these two quotes: ‘The biggest mistake I ever made as president is appointing Jeff Sessions U.S. Attorney General.’ Or this quote, ‘Jeff Sessions is a disgrace to the great state of Alabama.’ Those two quotes that he made several months ago — I don’t see how Jeff gets over those.”

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Byrne said he disagreed with Sessions’ decision to recuse himself from any Department of Justice investigations into the 2016 elections and added that if Sessions believed his recusal was necessary, he should have resigned his post at attorney general given the scope of the investigation into the 2016 election.

“I don’t think he needed to recuse himself,” he said. “But if he felt like he needed to recuse himself, he should have resigned because he took himself out of a big chunk of what the attorney general is supposed to be doing. Look at all the things we learned in the inspector general’s report. Because he took himself off the playing field, months went by before we dealt with that. And now Attorney General Barr is dealing with that, thank God. If he couldn’t do his job, he should have said, ‘Look, I can’t do my job. I’m going to have to resign,’ and didn’t do that.”

Byrne’s sentiments echo those of another one of the candidates in the run for the 2020 GOP U.S. senatorial nod, former Auburn head football coach Tommy Tuberville, who a day earlier raised similar concerns about Sessions.

According to Byrne, Sessions should have seen the controversy looming on the horizon and not have accepted the appointment as attorney general during the 2016-2017 presidential transition.

“I don’t see how he didn’t see it was coming,” Byrne said. “But assuming that he didn’t — still, once he determined ‘I cannot be involved in this. I have to recuse myself,’ he should have resigned and let somebody else do that job. The president would have put him somewhere else. The president would have said, ‘OK, Jeff — you can’t do that. I’ll make you Secretary of Homeland Security.’ He would have done that. But that’s not what Jeff did. The people of Alabama have got to decide how they feel about that. But I think it is perfectly legitimate to bring that up. I think it is perfectly legitimate for Tommy Tuberville to bring that up. If Jeff is not ready to talk about, he needs to understand he is in a political campaign.”

Sessions has previously told Yellowhammer News the controversy regarding his tenure as attorney general had not come up on the campaign trail. However, Byrne said it comes up regularly for him.

“They bring it up with me all the time,” he said. “If I’ve heard this once, I’ve heard this 300 or 400 times in the last few weeks alone — they’re angry with him. They’re angry he even got in the race. That’s something he has got to deal with. And you know, you look at his television commercial — that’s his effort to try to deal with it. I think that’s fair game. When you get into a campaign like this, you’ve got to expect that. We’re going to hear more about that. You’ll be hearing more about that from voters or whoever. I’m sticking with what I’m talking about right now. You know, we’ve hit a real thread with the voters here. They like what’s in that commercial I’m showing right now, the personal touch with it. So I’m going to stay with that. It’s working for me, and I’m just going to stay right there.”

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University, the editor of Breitbart TV and host of “The Jeff Poor Show” from 2-5 p.m. on WVNN in Huntsville.

4 hours ago

Aderholt: ‘I look forward to the day when there are no more abortions’

Congressman Robert Aderholt (AL-04) recently spoke on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives about his staunch pro-life views.

Wednesday marks the 47th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court ruling.

Aderholt’s remarks can be seen in a video posted to his Twitter account.

“I stand here today as pro-life, pro-family and pro-child,” he began.

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“No matter what your faith is, everyone understands that life is very precious and that life is a gift,” Aderholt continued. “I believe that as members of Congress and really as all citizens, we’re called to protect the vulnerable — and this is one of my core beliefs.”

“Being pro-life means not just pro-birth but being interested in the welfare of the child during his or her entire formative years,” the dean of Alabama’s House delegation advised. “That’s why I’m not only a longtime member of the pro-life caucus but also the co-chair of the congressional coalition on adoption.”

He showed appreciation for the Trump administration’s work on pro-life issues.

“I want to take this opportunity to thank this administration for the work they have done to defend the unborn, including changing the rules for Title X and expanding the Mexico City Policy. I look forward to continuing to work with the administration on these issues as we come to the time of January [22], where we remember the ruling of Roe versus Wade,” Aderholt remarked.

“I look forward to the day when there are no more abortions because there’s no more unwanted children,” he concluded.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

4 hours ago

7 Things: Impeachment fight finally on, Doug Jones tied to Schiff and Omar, indicted judges may not get paid anymore and more …

7. Alabamians are lazy

  • The Centers for Disease Control has released a list of physical activity levels by state for adults, and Alabama ranked fourth out of states with the highest inactivity level.
  • According to the report, 31% of adults in Alabama were reported as not being physically active. Mississippi ranked first with 33%, Arkansas second with 32.5%, Kentucky in third with 32.2% and Louisiana in fifth with 30.9%.

6. Biden slipping but still the favorite

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  • Apparently, the idea that U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is a giant sexist monster didn’t successfully derail his candidacy. In fact, a new poll has him leading the Democratic field with former Vice President Joe Biden with 24% closely behind U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) lagging with 14%.
  • Biden finds himself in a precarious situation. He has dropped 10 points in this poll since October while Sanders has surged up 11.

5. Daycares could be taking on a new responsibility

  • State Representative Randy Wood (R-Anniston) has prepared a bill to file with the legislature called the Cash Edwin Jordan Act. The bill would require that daycares contact the parents or guardians if a child doesn’t arrive by 9:30 am.
  • The act is named for an 11-month-old that was accidentally left in the car back in September and passed away. Last year, there were 53 kids who died due to being left in a hot car last year across the United States, most of them being three-years-old or younger.

4. Sentencing reform is going nowhere in Alabama

  • In Montgomery, former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions spent time discussing President Donald Trump’s criminal justice reform bill. Sessions expressed his concern over the reduced sentences, saying he thinks some of them “went too far.”
  • Sessions went on to say the reductions made him “uneasy,” but he did go on to explain that he supported several parts of the bill, including educating and helping them successfully prepare for being released.

3. Indicted judge still getting paid — a state representative wants to change that

  • Limestone County Judge Doug Patterson has been indicted on felony charges, but he’s still on the state payroll and collecting his paycheck. Now, State Representative Andy Whitt (R-Harvest) is calling for Patterson’s resignation.
  • Whitt has said that Patterson shouldn’t continue to get paid if he isn’t a working judge, also mentioning how the other three judges in the county are overworked as they pick up Patterson’s work since he was suspended last year, but every month Patterson is getting paid $10,808.84.

2. Super-PAC is throwing punches at Doug Jones

  • U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) has shown no interest in opposing the impeachment of President Donald Trump, and now the super-PAC America First Policies has put out an ad against Jones, deeming impeachment as a “radical left” project.
  • In the ad, Jones is shown to be in agreement with people like U.S. Representatives Adam Schiff (D-CA) and Ilhan Omar (D-MN). The ad features a clip of Jones saying, “This is not a witch hunt, this is not a hoax.” Publicly, though, Jones has told CNN that he will be reelected no matter how he votes, but in the public, he hasn’t stated how he plans to vote on impeachment.

1. White House lawyers are playing offense, Democrats want witnesses

  • With the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump opening in the U.S. Senate, lawyers for Trump came out and said that the House Democrats have “no case.” White House counsel Pat Cipollone said some of the Democratic senators “should be in Iowa,” referencing U.S. Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MD).
  • Cipollone added, “Instead, we’re here and they’re not ready to go.” When U.S. Representative Adam Schiff (D-CA) took the floor, he called for a “fair trial” that he thinks most people don’t expect, as he believes people think Trump will be acquitted because of partisan politics, as if he is not partisan.

5 hours ago

Jones votes with Schumer, Democrats every time to begin Trump impeachment trial

Six-for-six. No, it is not the new deal at Wendy’s fast-food restaurants. That was Senator Doug Jones’ (D-AL) 100% record of voting with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) on Tuesday, the first day of the Senate’s impeachment trial of President Donald J. Trump.

Jones has emphasized that he does not view impeachment through a partisan lens, however, all six of his votes fell along strict party lines to start off the impeachment trial.

The votes were on tabling Democrat amendments to the trial rules proposed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY). All 53 Republicans all six times voted to table the amendments, while all 47 Democrats voted against tabling the amendments.

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This comes after an ad was released earlier in the day accusing Jones of “siding with them” on impeachment, meaning siding with “the radical left.” A Jones spokesperson on Tuesday night blasted the ad as containing “blatant lies.”

RELATED: Jones vows to not be swayed by political forces on right or left on impeachment — ‘It is not worth their time’

Jones recently claimed in a CNN interview that he will be reelected in November even if he votes to remove Trump from office.

Additionally, Alabama’s junior senator recently said he is “not trying to please Chuck Schumer” nor is he “trying to necessarily please anyone” during the impeachment trial.

The “anyone” part of that statement may very well remind Alabamians of his infamous line during the Kavanaugh confirmation process, when Jones declared that representing the majority of his constituents is not “the be all to end all.” Jones ultimately voted against the confirmation.

Editor’s note: As of this writing, Jones shortly after 12:00 a.m. ET Wednesday voted with the Democrats on another impeachment trial rules amendment, making his record seven-for-seven.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn