2 months ago

Auburn University launches website for coronavirus resources

Auburn University on Friday announced that it has launched a website on coronavirus-related topics as a helpful resource for the public.

Through the new website, Auburn researchers share their expertise regarding healthcare, the economy, community impacts and education. The site is intended to support Alabamians and people across the country as they navigate the landscape inflicted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

To access the site, click here.

The university will finish its spring 2020 semester via online instruction. Spring commencement has been combined with the summer commencement, scheduled for August 8-9.

Summer courses will also only be offered online for at least sessions 1 and 2.

The Alabama Department of Public Health is now providing real-time updates of the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the state. You can view that information here.

RELATED: Keep up with Alabama’s confirmed coronavirus cases, locations here

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

20 mins ago

City of Mobile cleans Confederate statue after overnight vandalism; Suspect arrested, charged

The statue of Admiral Raphael Semmes in downtown Mobile was defaced on Monday night, with a suspect already being booked and the monument restored.

Local media outlets reported that 20-year-old Mitchell Bond, a white male, has been arrested and charged with a misdemeanor after graffiting the base of the statue.

A two-person crew from the City of Mobile reportedly spent more than an hour power-washing the statue, and the spray paint can no longer be seen, per WKRG.

Bond, apparently sporting a t-shirt depicting former President Bill Clinton firing a gun, was hauled off to jail in handcuffs on Tuesday. His arrest came after investigators utilized surveillance footage of the incident, per NBC 15.

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Semmes commanded the CSS Alabama in the Confederate Navy. He died in Mobile in 1877.

Originally dedicated in 1900, the statue of Semmes is covered by the Alabama Memorial Preservation Act.

George Talbot, director of communications and external affairs for the City of Mobile, told Fox 10 that “the statue was vandalized last night and a suspect has been identified. The graffiti is being cleaned, as we would do with any public property. Any decision on moving it would be collaborative in nature. There is a process for that, and we are listening to the community’s voice as part of that process.”

Semmes is a member of the Alabama Hall of Fame. The City of Semmes in western Mobile County was named after him, as was The Admiral Hotel (a Curio by Hilton property) in downtown Mobile.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

43 mins ago

Dale Jackson: Politicians taking a knee display performative wokeness, performative weakness

Why would an American politician take a knee as protesters chant “take a knee” or publish a picture of them taking a knee to social media?

There are only two reasons: performative wokeness or performative weakness.

There is a difference, but every single time some sad white politician thinks he or she can quiet a mob or show solidarity by taking a knee they are sadly mistaken.

That never appears to be the goal. This appears to be about pandering acquiescence and nothing more.

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Huntsville Mayor Tommy Battle, a public official of one of the most progressive non-college towns in the state, took a knee at a “mostly peaceful protest.”

Why?

According to Battle, he was attempting to show he supported the protest to keep his community safe.

“You know, I walked up and they said ‘kneel with me,'” Battle said on WVNN’s “The Dale Jackson Show.” “I didn’t know if they wanted to pray or if they wanted to kneel, but I was fine with it. You know, there’s no pride in this thing. The pride is getting through the event and getting through it with our community intact and without shots being fired and without windows being broken. If it takes kneeling, I’ll kneel to try to make sure our community is safe.”

That is performative wokeness.

When asked about the chants and demands that cops kneel at this same protest, Battle said he never saw that and felt there was no need for it from Huntsville police.

“They kept saying, ‘They need to kneel, they need to kneel.’ There wasn’t a need for them to kneel. They were standing there doing their job and they were standing there as a blue line in front of everybody to make sure people were safe,” Battle explained.

They did not kneel.

But some cops have taken a knee.

Either way, Mayor Battle can support their cause and be a part of it. He can, and does, support the removal of the Confederate memorial on Madison County Courthouse grounds but these protesters still wanted an image of him on his knees.

They got it.

Did he get what he wanted?

Nope.

Tear gas was needed, rocks were thrown, rioters went to another part of the city, and attempted to attack a shopping center.

So it is now performative weakness on Battle’s part. We will see how it plays out at the next scheduled protest in Huntsville on Wednesday.

Nationally, Joe Biden visited a church in Delaware and took this photo:

Now, this is performative wokeness!

Mask on tight, even though it was off earlier in the visit. Biden centered in the photo, down on one knee, while black leaders stand behind him.

It might as well be this episode of “South Park,” where a main character attempts to atone for a racial slur by kissing Jesse Jackson’s backside (it didn’t work).

Joe Biden is doing whatever he needs to win an election, nothing more.

That is performative wokeness.

When it comes to a politician or any other figure being cajoled to take a knee in solidarity with protesters, it can only be a sign of performative wokeness or performative weakness. Those are the only options.

Americans do not want their leaders “taking a knee” to anyone. They want strength and someone who stands tall.

As cities burn and threats to businesses and communities remain, the last thing people want is the appearance of wokeness from their leaders and they definitely don’t want weakness.

That’s what this is.

Whether you like Trump or not, walking out to a burned church after ordering a park cleared of a disruptive element is a statement of power and leadership.

The media hates this. They wanted Trump trapped in the White House while they cheerlead for chaos and carnage.

They all want Trump to look weak, but he is engaging in performative strength.

The question is about what Americans want from leaders.

Americans want more strength, more law and order, less violence and a sense of normalcy.

Trump has to deliver this, not with words and photo ops but in action, too.

Listen:

Dale Jackson is a contributing writer to Yellowhammer News and hosts a talk show from 7-11 AM weekdays on WVNN.

2 hours ago

Jefferson County issues curfew; Most Jeff Co. cities also under curfew

The Jefferson County Commission on Tuesday voted to impose a curfew on the unincorporated portions of its jurisdiction, as most cities within the county are also under curfew.

Following the violence, vandalism and looting that occurred in Birmingham on Sunday night, municipalities in the metropolitan area quickly moved to prepare against potential civil unrest.

WBRC reported that the unincorporated areas of Jefferson County now have a curfew from 7:00 p.m. until to 6:00 a.m. The curfew currently runs through June 9.

This mirrors the curfew of many cities within the county.

Per WBRC, here are current city curfews in the Birmingham metro area:

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Mountain Brook — 7:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Birmingham — 7:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Hueytown — 7:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Hoover — 7:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Tarrant — 6:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Homewood — 8: 00p.m. – 5:00 a.m.
Leeds — 6:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Adamsville — 7:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Gardendale — 7:00 p.m. – 5:00 a.m.
Irondale — 7:00 p.m. – 6:00 a.m.

Hoover has also been dealing in recent days with tense protests, culminating in at least 45 arrests as of Monday, according to The Hoover Sun. A state of emergency has been declared by Hoover Mayor Frank Brocato.

The newspaper reported that Hoover Police Chief Nick Derzis said that officers had bottles of water, bottles of urine and eggs thrown at them during demonstrations, and one police officer was injured. Two retail stores reportedly had glass doors and/or windows smashed.

The Hoover Sun further reported that Jefferson County Emergency Management Agency Director Jim Coker made a request on the county’s and multiple area cities’ behalf to the Alabama Emergency Management Agency to have the National Guard available to assist any part of the county that may need help in maintaining the peace.

Jefferson County Commission President Jimmie Stephens and the respective mayors of Hoover, Homewood, Mountain Brook and Vestavia Hills all requested this action, Coker told the newspaper.

This came after Governor Kay Ivey on Monday announced that she has given authorization to Adjutant General Sheryl Gordon with the Alabama National Guard to activate up to 1,000 guardsmen, should the need arise in response to violent civil unrest.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

3 hours ago

Local pastor uses earnings from gospel album to pay off $900K in medical debt held by neighboring Birminghamians

Birmingham pastor Mike McClure, Jr.’s recent album spent 10 weeks on the Billboard Gospel chart, and he is now using some of the proceeds to help those around him.

He partnered with RIP Medical Debt, a charity that buys large bundles of medical debt hospitals are not sure they can collect on for a small percentage of the total amount owed. The charity then forgives what an individual owes, relieving them of their debts penalty-free

McClure’s generosity was first reported by ABC33/40. He was able to purchase and forgive $900,000 worth of debt, which eased the financial load of 542 families.

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“Being from Birmingham, I made God a promise that if he ever blessed me, that I would in turn bless others. So, I’m just so grateful and humble to keep up my end of the promise,” McClure told ABC33/40.

The 36-year-old reverend founded Rock City Church in 2009, and it has grown to several thousand members that meet in three different locations.

In addition to its sales success, McClure’s album, called “Live Free,” was nominated for five Stellar Awards. The Stellar Awards honor the best in gospel music each year.

The name he uses as a recording artist is Pastor Mike Jr., and his work can be found on major streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music.

The paying off of medical debt is not McClure’s first act of generosity. He also attracted attention when his church gave away gasoline in recent years when gas prices were high.

“I am utterly grateful to be part of such an incredible city, we’re not divided, we’re all coming together to help those in need and if we can keep that same energy, I think that Birmingham can be a place of reconciliation and change. Get ready, because what God is doing in Birmingham is going to be big,” McClure concluded in his comments to ABC33/40.

Henry Thornton is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can contact him by email: henry@yellowhammernews.com or on Twitter @HenryThornton95

4 hours ago

Hurricane season begins — ‘Preparedness must still be a focus for every Alabamian’

Hurricane season officially began on Monday, and Governor Kay Ivey is urging Alabamians to be prepared.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has predicted an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season this year, forecasting between three to six major hurricanes, six to 10 total hurricanes and 13 to 19 named storms.

“June 1 marks the first day of hurricane season, and as we know, Alabama is far too familiar with the uncertainty and damage that accompanies any severe weather,” Ivey said in a statement.

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“The National Weather Service is predicting an above-normal 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs now through November 30,” she continued. “As our country focuses on safely reopening our economy and combatting a health pandemic, it is also vitally important we remember to make preparations now for any severe weather, because hurricanes, tornadoes and severe weather will not wait for us to be ready. Hurricane preparedness must still be a focus for every Alabamian.”

You can learn more about preparedness here.

Stay up-to-date with the latest information from the National Weather Service here.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn