4 years ago

Alabama company goes all out to bring hero dogs home from war


(Video above: How AMK9 got roughly 100 hero dogs back home)

When veterans come home from war, we celebrate and honor their service and help them readjust to civilian life. One Alabama company is doing that same thing for America’s four-legged veterans.

AMK9, based in Anniston, recently transported 92 service dogs back to the United States from the Middle East. The logistics of bringing so many animals on the 7,000-mile journey was unprecedented, but AMK9 was up for the challenge.

“[These dogs] are a critical part of what we do every day around the world. And this is the way we take care of them,” said Pete Owen, VP of Operations. Most of these dogs will be adopted and spend their retirement as family pets. A few dogs will be reassigned to jobs in the US that are similar to the work they did overseas.

For years, AMK9 has been fundamental in starting the careers of military dogs, but now they are helping them at the end of their careers as well.

Transporting 92 dogs 7,000 miles across a number of different countries, with multiple customs checks and potentials for delays, would be enough to make anyone’s head spin. But AMK9 went all out and did extensive research to prepare for the journey. The team coordinated with veterinary clinics along the way to ensure they had the capabilities to deal with any issue for any dog.

The dogs flew in to New York City where they were fed, watered, and given a medical examination. Once they were all cleared, they were loaded up for the final leg of their journey: a 955-mile drive from New York City to Anniston. With bathroom breaks and refueling the trucks, the trip took two whole days.

Once they arrived in Anniston, the dogs had to be broken in to their new civilian life. Each dog takes hours of work and manpower to retrain. Having to train 92 dogs at once changed the entire scope of the work. But AMK9 planned down to the smallest detail. Every person knew exactly what his or her job was and how it fit in the larger picture, making this undertaking an undeniable success.

Thirty-eight of the dogs were immediately ready to transition into retired life. AMK9 partnered with Piper’s Rescue, a local rescue pet adoption program, to find the right homes for these hero dogs. The dogs were adopted out to families all over the country, even as far as Wyoming. Piper’s Rescue researched the medical history and work history of each dog to help them find the right home for retirement.

“It feels really good to see the slow process of them transforming from working dog to family pet, from them realizing that they don’t have to go, go, go every day; they don’t have to work and save people’s lives,” explained Sara Hare, owner of Piper’s Rescue. “They can just be loving, and they can just be spoiled and have these people love on them for the rest of their lives.”

The employees of AMK9 recognize the importance of the work they have done. Finding homes for these retired military dogs not only changes their lives, but also the lives of the families who adopt them.

John Wertjes, Chief Operating Officer, came to work for AMK9 because of the rewarding work they do. “A lot of people want to do something that makes a difference in the world, and we get to do that.”

(Video below: Yellowhammer goes inside AMK9’s operation)

Episode 1: SEC Network’s Cole Cubelic

Dale Jackson is joined by the SEC Network personality and WJOX-FM’s Three Man Front host Cole Cubelic.

Cole describes his path to multimedia stardom — from putting on the pads as a middle-schooler to pharmaceutical sales to calling SEC football games. Cole shares how his wife’s supported him throw the lows and how he got to his highs.
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13 hours ago

Episode 22: It’s Bo time

With Auburn announcing Bo Nix the starter at quarterback, DrunkAubie reconvenes to react and answer listeners’ questions about the freshman. DrunkAubie also discusses the top traditions and top mascots in college football and offers up some advice for the upcoming season.

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13 hours ago

State Rep. John Rogers not running for U.S. Senate, says Jones showing ‘conservatism’ but not racist

State Rep. John Rogers (D-Birmingham) on Wednesday told Yellowhammer News that he will not run in the 2020 Democratic U.S. Senate primary against Senator Doug Jones (D-AL).

Rogers began considering a potential bid towards the tail-end of the Alabama legislature’s regular session this spring. At that time, he told Yellowhammer News, “I don’t want to run a campaign just to run. I want to run to win.”

He said he needed to raise $500,000 in order to be competitive.

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However, after testing the waters for months, Rogers has concluded that he cannot raise sufficient funds, saying Jones’ war chest was too much to overcome in a primary. Rogers previously challenged Jones to a public debate, which Alabama’s junior senator ignored.

The state representative from Jefferson County on Wednesday also commented on the ongoing battle that has pitted Jones and the Democratic National Committee (DNC) against the leadership of the Alabama Democratic Party and the Alabama Democratic Conference (ADC).

Rogers said that he disagreed with the charges of racism against Jones made by the state party’s secretary, Val Bright, who last week penned an open letter saying that Jones and the DNC were targeting “blacks” in their effort to overhaul the party’s structure and leadership.

“Although blacks have been faithful to the Democratic Party and are largely responsible for electing Doug Jones and any white seeking office in this state, once elected on the backs of blacks, the urgency to remove black leadership begins,” Bright stated.

“In other words, as long as we’re working in the fields all is well, but when we move to positions of authority, a challenge begins,” she added. “From slavery through Reconstruction, Jim Crow and the Civil Rights movement, we are constantly being shown how little respect blacks receive for being hard working and loyal.”

Rogers advised that he does not believe Jones to be a racist.

“Because Alabama is a conservative state, and you’ve got to have some conservatives in the legislature (Congress) — I hate to say that, but it is Alabama, and if you’re going to run for a statewide office, you’ve got to be in the middle of the road,” Rogers said. “And Doug knows that. I mean — I don’t like some of the things he does to show his ‘conservatism,’ but if you want to be expecting to win against a Republican, you’ve got to show some conservatism.”

Rogers continued to say Jones is still his friend and has been “for a long time.”

“I don’t think he’s racist, I wouldn’t dare call him a racist,” Rogers concluded.

RELATED: Rogers: Jones called me, admitted I was ‘right’ on abortion remarks

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

13 hours ago

University of Alabama in Huntsville honored for discovering one of physics’ ‘Holy Grails’

The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) announced this week that it has been honored by The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers with a Milestone Plaque for a 1987 physics discovery.

The discovery of superconductivity at 93 Kelvin occurred on January 29, 1987, and the dedication of the award recognizes “the impact of the world’s first material to superconduct above the technologically significant temperature of liquid nitrogen.”

UAH said in a release posted to its website, “The material that is the subject of the discovery was first conceived, synthesized, and tested in a UAH physics laboratory in Wilson Hall. It has been referred to by some science writers as one of physics’ ‘Holy Grails.’ The discovery prompted an American Physical Society meeting in March of 1987 to become known as ‘The Woodstock of Physics.'”

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The site added, “By crossing the 77 Kelvin barrier and making superconductivity possible at the temperature of the much more affordable and easily used coolant liquid nitrogen, the material discovered at UAH opened up a realm of more practical superconductivity applications.”

The site also noted that superconductors have been useful in powerful electromagnets, such as those used in MRI and NMR machines, maglev trains, and fusion reactor research; low-loss electrical power cables; fast fault current limiters; fast digital circuits; sensitive detection and measurement of magnetism, subatomic particles, and light, along with radio-frequency and microwave filters.

The UAH material has been used in high field magnets (holding the current record of 45.5 Tesla), electric power cables, fault current limiters, and radio-frequency filters.

A bronze plaque, which was presented on Monday, will be mounted outside the room that once served as the superconductivity laboratory at UAH.

The plaque reads as follows:

On this site, a material consisting of yttrium, barium, copper, and oxygen was first conceived, synthesized, tested, and — on 29 January 1987 — found to exhibit stable and reproducible superconductivity at 93 Kelvin. This marked the first time the phenomenon had been unambiguously achieved above 77 Kelvin, the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, thus enabling more practical and widespread use of superconductors.

Kyle Morris also contributes daily to Breitbart News. You can follow him on Twitter @RealKyleMorris.

14 hours ago

‘Gun control’ may be popular, but eventually its proponents will have to explain what it means

A popular refrain in American politics today is that “Americans want stricter gun laws.”

Is that true? Sort of.

NPR released the following poll results:

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60% of Americans want “stricter gun laws.”

85% of Democrats want “stricter gun laws.”

58% of independents want “stricter gun laws.”

39% of Republicans want “stricter gun laws.”

But what does that mean?

Here is what the “March for Our Lives” proponents have started pushing for in something they called the “Peace Plan.”

It is a wishlist of ideas, some popular, some unpopular. Some of the ideas are unconstitutional and most are ineffective feel-good ideas or vindictive uses of the federal government power to punish their enemies.

Do Americans want gun registry and licensing?

The CNN report of the “Peace Plan” states, “The first prong of the plan calls for legislation that would ‘raise the national standard for gun ownership’ through several mechanisms, including a national licensing and registry system.

Yes, 70% of Americans favor “Requiring all privately-owned guns to be registered with the police.”

This is unconstitutional.

How about a handgun ban?

The CNN report explains, “The plan calls for a review of the 2008 Supreme Court decision in District of Columbia v. Heller, which overturned a ban on handguns in the nation’s capital and upheld the view that the Second Amendment protects an individual right to own a gun for personal use.”

No, a 2018 poll says 71% oppose that.

But the request is for a “review” of the ruling by who?

“By directing the Justice Department to review the decision and ensuring the next generation of federal judges appointed by the President have ‘a different interpretation of the Second Amendment,'” the report outlines.

So, a litmus test to all future judges in order to change the 2nd Amendment to only appoint people that will declare what is currently unconstitutional is now constitutional?

Aren’t these the same people who scream about precedent and demand that the Roe v. Wade ruling be held as an untouchable benchmark in American history?

How about a punishing of their political opponents with the force of government?

The CNN report says, “The plan also calls for the investigation of the National Rifle Association by the Federal Election Commission and the Internal Revenue Service.”

This is a stunning request here. There is no indication the NRA is out breaking laws, but gun-grabbers want to use government entities to take them on?

This mentality is exactly why the 2nd Amendment exists.

Tyranny, even by the majority, is still tyranny.

Shouldn’t we be wary when the same people that want to punish you for wrong-think also want to talk about gun registries and gun-confiscation?

The “no one wants your guns” charade is over.

Make no mistake, these people want your guns.

Dale Jackson is a contributing writer to Yellowhammer News and hosts a talk show from 7-11 am weekdays on WVNN.