4 months ago

YHRadio: Amanda Head Makes Her Friday Visit On The Ford Faction

Amanda Head joins the guys on her weekly visit on The Ford Faction to talk about Auburn football, Thanksgiving plans, Roy Moore, and Al Franken’s recent scandel.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Presents The Ford Faction podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

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17 mins ago

German auto supplier opens $46.3 million plant in Alabama

MöllerTech, a German auto supplier, has opened a $46.3 million plant in central Alabama.

Company officials said 222 employees will be hired at the new supply plant by the end of 2019, Al.com reported . The ribbon-cutting ceremony was held this week almost 16 months after the company announced it would build the plant in Bibb County.


Steve Jordan, President of MöllerTech’s North American division said the supply plant currently has 50 employees.

The supply plant will be next door to Mercedes-Benz’s new Global Logistics Center at the Scott G. Davis Industrial Park. The auto maker will also have an after-sales North American hub in the park.

Mercedes-Benz U.S. International CEO Jason Hoff attended the ribbon cutting to welcome MöllerTech.

“This is a beautiful facility, and as a customer, when you walk in and get a first impression, it’s a very favorable impression,” he said.

MöllerTech’s parent company MöllerGroup has been in business for three centuries. The company has had a business relationship with Mercedes since the 1950s.

MöllerTech develops interior parts for Audi, BMW, Daimler, GM, Honda, Porche, Rolls-Royce and Toyota.

“There’s been a lot of energy among our early hires, which is very encouraging,” Jordan said. “Some have already grown into new positions early on which is very encouraging.”

(Image: Made In Alabama)

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

1 hour ago

DeVoe, Clemson rout cold-shooting Auburn to reach Sweet 16

Clemson isn’t all about football.

The Tigers are pretty good at basketball, too, and are going to the Sweet 16 for the first time in 21 years.


Gabe DeVoe scored 22 points and Elijah Thomas had 18 points and 11 rebounds for Clemson, which closed the first half with a 25-4 run that helped it beat cold-shooting Auburn 84-53 on Sunday and advance to the Midwest Region semifinal.

“I think it’s a statement game,” Clemson guard Marcquise Reed said. “I think we showed how hard we can compete defensively. I think it’s a real good game for us moving forward.”

In a matchup between Southern schools better known for football — Clemson won the national championship two seasons ago — the No. 5 seed Clemson Tigers proved far more adept on the hardwood than the No. 4 seed Auburn Tigers.

The blowout win put Clemson (25-9) into the Sweet 16 for the fourth time overall and the first since 1997, earning it a spot against Kansas in the regional semifinal.

It was a humbling end for Auburn (26-8), which played this season under the cloud of a federal investigation into corruption in college basketball.

The final 10½ minutes of the first half were a nightmare for Auburn, which made only 6 of 33 shots (18.2 percent) in the first half and 17 of 66 overall (25.8 percent).

“I really don’t know where we lost our focus,” Auburn guard Bryce Brown said. “All I can really honestly remember is they had a few stretches where they came down and knocked down shots and we had a few stretches where we came down and took kind of bad shots at times and that led to easy fast breaks for them.”

Jared Harper made a jumper with 10:33 before halftime to pull Auburn to 18-15. The Tigers then missed their next 18 field goals as Clemson raced to a 43-19 halftime lead.

Clemson scored 17 straight points, highlighted by 3-pointers by Anthony Oliver II and DeVoe, to make it 35-15.

Chuma Okeke made two free throws for Auburn, but the Tigers still couldn’t hit a field goal. They got two more free throws by Mustapha Heron with 1:20 to go.

Auburn finally snapped the drought from the field when Bryce Brown hit a 3-pointer 44 seconds into the second half. All that did was pull the Tigers within 21 points.

“I felt like they had a couple of good looks and they weren’t able to knock them down,” DeVoe said. “But we play well defensively like that. The easy looks don’t go in all the time. I think pressure and our defensive intensity really bottled them up offensively.”

The drought “was just bad for us early and it affected what we could do offensively and defensively,” Auburn’s Jarred Harper said.

“We just got away from playing offense together and playing defense together,” Davion Mitchell said.

Heron and Bryce Brown scored 12 points apiece for Auburn and Horace Spencer had 10.

Reed added 16 for Clemson and Shelton Mitchell had 10.

The rout was so complete that Clemson subbed in two walk-ons for the final two minutes.


“I don’t know how long since we’ve been to the Sweet 16, but I know for a fact this won’t be the last time,” Oliver said. “We have a special group of guys, not only for this year but for next year and the year after that.”


Clemson made 10 of 26 3-pointers. DeVoe made 6 of 9.

Auburn heads into an uncertain offseason. Assistant coach Chuck Person was indicted as part of a federal investigation that cost two of Auburn’s best players their eligibility. Person was accused of accepting bribes to steer players to a financial adviser once they turned pro and funneling money to the families of Austin Wiley and Danjel Purifoy. Neither played this season.


The 25 wins ties Clemson’s school record. … This was Clemson’s largest margin of victory in the NCAAs. The previous largest was an 83-70 win against Saint Mary’s in 1989.


Clemson plays top-seeded Kansas on Friday in Omaha.

(Image: NCAA March Madness/YouTube)

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

2 hours ago

Is the GOP staring at another 1930?

After the victory of Donald Trump in 2016, the GOP held the Senate and House, two-thirds of the governorships, and 1,000 more state legislators than they had on the day Barack Obama took office.

“The Republican Party has not been this dominant in 90 years,” went the exultant claim.

A year later, Republicans lost the governorship of Virginia and almost lost the legislature.


Came then the loss of a U.S. Senate seat in ruby-red Alabama.

Tuesday, Democrats captured a House seat in a Pennsylvania district Trump carried by 20 points, and where Democrats had not even fielded a candidate in 2014 and 2016.

Republicans lately congratulating themselves on a dominance not seen since 1928, might revisit what happened to the Class of 1928.

In 1930, Republicans lost 52 House seats, portending the loss of both houses of Congress and the White House in 1932 to FDR who would go on to win four straight terms. For the GOP, the ’30s were the dreadful decade.

Is the GOP staring at another 1930?


Unlike 1930, though, the nation has not endured a Great Crash or gone through year one of a Great Depression where unemployment hit 10 percent in June, when the Smoot-Hawley tariff was passed.

Today, the economy is moving along smartly. The labor force is larger than it has ever been. Workers are re-entering and seeking jobs. Black and Hispanic unemployment are at record lows. Confidence is high. Our Great Recession is 10 years in the past.

The problem for Republicans may be found in a truism: When the economy is poor, the economy is the issue. When the economy is good, something else is the issue.

A good economy did not save the GOP in the 18th Congressional District of Pennsylvania, where the party’s tax cut was derided by Democrat Conor Lamb as a wealth transfer to the rich. Nor did Lamb hurt himself by implying Republicans were planning to pay for their tax cut by robbing Social Security and Medicare.

Republican candidate Rick Saccone reportedly stopped using the tax cut as his major issue in his TV ads that ran closest to Election Day.

Other factors point to a bad day for the GOP on Nov. 6.

Republican retirees from Congress far outnumber Democratic retirees.

Democratic turnout has been reaching record highs, while GOP turnout has been normal. And even in the special elections Democrats have lost, they are outperforming the Democrats who lost in 2016.

Relying upon hostility to Trump to bring out the resistance, savvy Democrats are taking on the political coloration of their districts and states, rather than of the national party of Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and Bernie Sanders.

There is, however, troubling news from Pennsylvania for Nancy Pelosi.

Lamb promised voters of “Deerhunter” country he would not support San Francisco Nancy for speaker. Look for Democrats in districts Trump carried to begin talking of the “need for new leaders.”

Trump seems fated to be the primary target of attack this fall, and not only in districts Clinton carried. For an average of national polls shows that disapproval of his presidency is 14 points higher than his approval rating. And this is when the economy is turning up good numbers not seen in this century.

At the national level, Democrats will turn 2018 into a referendum on the Trump persona and Trump presidency. For while the Trump base is loyal and solid, the anti-Trump base is equally so, and appreciably larger.

Lest we forget, Hillary Clinton, not the most charismatic candidate the Democrats have put up in decades, beat Trump by nearly 3 million votes. And while Trump pierced the famous “blue wall” — the 18 states that voted Democratic in every presidential election between 1992 and 2012 — the demographic trend that created the wall is still working.

White voters, who tend to vote Republican, continue to decline as a share of the population. Peoples of color, who vote 70 to 90 percent Democratic in presidential elections, are now nearly 40 percent of the nation.

Mass migration into America is re-enforcing that trend.

Moreover, millennials, who have many elections ahead of them, are more liberal than seniors, who have fewer elections ahead and are the GOP base.

But if Republicans face problems of demography, the party of “tax and tax, spend and spend, and elect and elect” appears to be reaching the end of its tether. Federal deficits are rising toward trillion-dollar levels.

The five largest items in the budget — Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, defense, interest on the debt — are rising inexorably. And there appears no disposition in either party to cut back on spending for education, college loans, food stamps, housing assistance or infrastructure.

If the Fed did not retain the power to control the money supply, then the fate of New Jersey and Illinois, and beyond, of Greece and Argentina, would become our national destiny.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of a new book, “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

(Image: Gage Skidmore/Flickr & Wikicommons)

(Creators, copyright 2018)

2 hours ago

Alabama man charged in connection with 91-year-old woman’s death

Police in Alabama say a man has been charged in connection with the death of a 91-year-old woman.

Dothan police said in a news release Sunday that 58-year-old Joe Nathan Duncan was charged with capital murder in the death of 91-year-old Mabel Fowler.


Police say they received a call of a possible death at a residence Saturday. Once officers arrived, it was apparent that it was a crime scene.

Throughout the course of the investigation, police located, interviewed and charged Duncan. It’s unclear if he has a lawyer.

(Image: Dothan Police Department)

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

3 hours ago

7 Things: Democrats want to hire disgraced FBI deputy, storm trackers enter Alabama ahead of severe weather, bill to allow teachers to carry to get a floor debate, and more …

1. Democrat Congresspersons want to hire the disgraced FBI Deputy Director just to stick it to Trump (and taxpayers)

— Democrats are offering him jobs in their offices in order to help him make it to his retirement date, his retirement is worth $1.8 million dollars.

— Another Democrat, and Trump critic, Adam Schiff says McCabe’s firing “may have been justified”.

2. Now former-FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe fired two days before his retirement for lying to investigators

— McCabe was fired after Inspector General Michael Horowitz concluded that McCabe misled investigators about his role in directing other officials at the FBI to speak to the media about the corruption investigation into the Clinton Foundation.

McCabe is claiming this is all an attempt to silence him, which makes little sense, and an attempt to discredit the Mueller probe.

3. Renowned storm trackers have entered the state of Alabama, which could foreshadow a rough weather day ahead

— The “national Storm Prediction Center” says there is an “enhanced risk” of severe storms for Nashville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, Huntsville, and Tuscaloosa.

— School districts are already announcing school closures to prepare for the weather.

4. Bill that would allow some teachers to conceal carry will get House debate, no movement in the Senate

— A bill that would allow approved teachers to carry  in schools could spark an intense debate Tuesday in the Alabama House of Representatives.

— House Speaker Mac McCutcheon questioned the idea of arming teachers, but he said it could be a bigger piece of school safety.

5. Not only did Russians meddle in our election, they also can play with our power grid

— After last week’s acknowledgment that Russia played in our election, the Trump administration has blamed Russia for hacking into American energy infrastructure, potentially causing issues with power delivery.

— A House committee also found that Russian-backed trolls “targeted pipelines, fossil fuels, climate change, and other divisive issues to influence public policy in the U.S.”, in order to sow discord.

6. State School Board member Mary Scott Hunter responds to State Rep. Harry Shiver’s comments on female teachers

— Shiver said, “our ladies” need the legislature to protect them and that female teachers “are scared of guns”, which was mocked last week.

— Hunter, who is also a State Senate candidate who supports the idea of allowing teachers to carry, tweeted that “ladies carry weapons just fine”, and included photos of her shooting weapons from her military service.

7. Social media company under scrutiny for doing data analysis on Americans, known in the past as targeting voters

— A company hired by the Trump campaign used Facebook data supplied by Facebook users to build profiles of users to better target them, Facebook has suspended the firm.

— 270,000 people downloaded an app that allowed the creator to see their likes, the creator passed that data was Cambridge Analytica and used to target Facebook users during the election.