3 years ago

Hillary’s campaign chairman connected to Birmingham’s failed attempt to land DNC

YH Hillary Clinton
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — When Hillary Clinton formally announced her presidential campaign Sunday, it was inevitable the long-time DC insider would assemble a power-packed, inside-the-beltway team, but you may not have expected the top member of that team to have an interesting — and perhaps infamous — Alabama connection.

Clinton’s newly-announced campaign chairman John Podesta is a co-founder of lobbying giant The Podesta Group, whose clients include Walmart, BP, Lockheed Martin, and several foreign governments, among many others.

Podesta was President Bill Clinton’s chief of staff and served as Counselor to President Obama in the White House, where his duties included “overseeing climate change and energy policy.” He also served as President of the ultra-liberal Center for American Progress, where he continues to serve as their Chair and Counselor.

In 2014, Podesta’s lobbying firm was controversially retained by the Birmingham city government in an effort to woo the 2016 Democratic National Convention (DNC) to the Magic City.

Birmingham paid The Podesta Group $150,000 in its doomed bid.

In a Yellowhammer reader poll last August, over 90 percent of respondents called such an expenditure of taxpayer money a “waste,” while 7 percent said the city should do whatever it takes to land the convention.

Birmingham ultimately did not even make the final list of potential host cities.

Birmingham lacked the level of infrastructure that other cities could offer. The city’s conference facilities were not up to snuff. There were likely not enough hotel rooms to accommodate the convention. The city’s public transit system — which recently ranked 94th among the nation’s 100 largest metro areas — would have probably been pushed beyond its breaking point. And all of that is on top of the political reality that, for all practical purposes, the Democratic Party doesn’t even exist in Alabama anymore.


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8 hours ago

Students: 1 million expected at anti-gun-violence marches

Students from the Florida high school where 17 people were fatally shot last month expect more than 1 million participants in upcoming marches in Washington and elsewhere calling for gun regulations, students said Monday.

More than 800 March for Our Lives demonstrations are planned around the world Saturday, sparked by the Feb. 14 shooting in Parkland, Florida.

“It just shows that the youth are tired of being the generation where we’re locked in closets and waiting for police to come in case of a shooter,” Alex Wind, a junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, told The Associated Press.


“We’re sick and tired of having to live with this normalcy of turning on the news and watching a mass shooting,” he added.

Since the massacre, Stoneman Douglas students have been at the forefront of a push to tighten gun restrictions and protect schools.

They have led rallies and lobbied lawmakers in Washington and Florida’s capital, Tallahassee. Last Wednesday, tens of thousands of students around the U.S. walked out of their classrooms to demand action on gun violence and school safety. Stoneman Douglas students fanned out Monday to discuss the marches with media outlets in New York, including NBC’s “Today” show and “CBS This Morning.”

The National Rifle Association didn’t immediately respond to an inquiry Monday about the upcoming marches. The group has said any effort to prevent future school shootings needs to “keep guns out of the hands of those who are a danger to themselves or others, while protecting the rights of law-abiding Americans.”

Amid the wave of activism, Florida passed a law curbing young peoples’ access to rifles; the NRA has sued to try to block it. Some major U.S. retailers decided to curb the sale of assault-style rifles or stop selling firearms to people younger than 21.

But Congress has shown little appetite for new gun regulations. President Donald Trump at one point proposed raising the minimum age for buying an assault rifle to 21 but then backed off, citing a lack of political support.

The Republican president has since released a school safety plan that includes strengthening the federal background check system and helping states pay for firearms training for teachers, while assigning the buying-age issue to a commission to study.

A petition associated with Saturday’s march calls for banning sales of assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines, as well as tightening background checks.

The suspect in the Parkland shooting, 19-year-old former student Nikolas Cruz, used an AR-15 assault-style rifle, according to authorities. His lawyer has said he will plead guilty in return for a life prison sentence, rather than possibly facing the death penalty.

The Associated Press reported Sunday that documents show some officials recommended in September 2016 that Cruz be involuntarily committed for a mental evaluation, though the recommendation was never acted upon. Such a commitment would have made it more difficult, if not impossible, for Cruz to get a gun legally.

Beyond making a statement, Saturday’s marches aim to make political change by registering and mobilizing people to vote.

But the students insist their aim isn’t partisan: “We’re just trying to make sure that morally just people are running this country,” Stoneman Douglas senior Ryan Deitsch told the AP.

As soon-to-be voters, the students say they’re here to stay in the public debate.

“We are not just a presence on Twitter. We are not just some social media fad. We’re not like Tide Pods,” Deitsch said, referring to the laundry detergent packets that recently sparked a dangerous social-media-fueled trend of teenagers eating them.

“We’re trying to push this idea that we have a voice, that people can speak out, and that that voice should be heard,” Deitsch said.

(Image: ABC News/YouTube)

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

Deborah Edwards Barnhart is a 2018 Yellowhammer Woman of Impact

The U.S. Space and Rocket Center may teach visitors about space vehicles that defy gravity, but for its CEO and Executive Director Deborah Edwards Barnhart, the center itself has proved gravitational – pulling her into its orbit several times throughout her four-decade career.

Barnhart, who will this month be honored as a Yellowhammer Woman of Impact, began working in public affairs and marketing at the Space and Rocket Center in the early 1970s when she was in her final year at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, according to a 2012 U.S. army article detailing her background.


After some time away, she returned to manage publicity when the center added the space shuttle.

“That’s when I became interested in satellites,” Barnhart told Army.mil reporter Kari Hawkins. “At that time, the Navy was in charge of all satellite programs. My father had been a Navy Seabee in World War II and my brother attended the Naval Academy. So, at the age of 27, I joined the Navy to work on satellites.”

Barnhart would serve 26 years in the military — achieving the rank of Navy captain and becoming one of the first 10 women certified to serve aboard Navy ships — before returning to the Space and Rocket Center in 1986 to serve as the director of Space Camp and Space Academy.

She went on to hold leadership roles in three major aerospace and defense companies including Honeywell International, United Technologies Aerospace and McDonnell Douglas. She also raised two children and earned graduate degrees from the University of Maryland and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a doctorate in strategy and supervision from Vanderbilt University.

Barnhart had retired from Honeywell and moved to Florida, where she did consulting and owned and managed two thoroughbred training centers, when she was recruited to take her fourth role at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center – this time as its CEO.

Since taking the position in 2010, Barnhart is credited with restoring the center’s financial health after it struggled for years with a staggering amount of debt racked up in the late 1990s.

Last year, the center saw an 11 percent increase in revenue and an 18 percent increase in camp revenue, as well as all-time record attendance, helping it maintain its spot as Alabama’s top attraction, according to a 2017 annual report.

“The Center is financially sound, engaged with our community, and focused on our mission of lighting the fires of imagination,” Barnhart wrote in the report.

Nearly 16 million people have toured the center since it opened in 1970. It is the largest spaceflight museum in the world.

Barnhart received NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal, its highest non-government recognition, and last October she was inducted into the Alabama Academy of Honor, along with Gov. Kay Ivey and two other women (the first time a class of inductees has all been female).

Barnhart will again be honored with Gov. Ivey in an awards event March 29 in Birmingham. The Yellowhammer Women of Impact event will honor 20 women making an impact in Alabama and will benefit Big Oak Ranch. Details and registration may be found here.

Rachel Blackmon Bryars is managing editor of Yellowhammer News.

9 hours ago

Talladega Superspeedway lands sponsor for October’s main event

Talladega Superspeedway announced today that the company 1000Bulbs.com would sponsor its October NASCAR Monster Energy Cup, which is one of sanctioning body’s 10 “playoff” events that determine who is the champion of its premier series.

The event scheduled for October 14 will be known as the 1000Bulbs.com 500. In previous years, the event had gone with the “Alabama 500” moniker without a primary sponsor.

The sponsor, 1000Bulbs.com, in a Texas-based company that focuses on specialty lighting. According to a release from the track, the company started with two employees and had grown to more than 240 people and “has over 2500 orders daily from 30,000 new customers each month.”


“We can’t wait for the 1000Bulbs.com 500 to get here,” Talladega Superspeedway chairman Grant Lynch said in a statement. “What a company 1000Bulbs.com is to partner with, one that strives for excellence with cutting-edge technology and so many incredible lighting products to take care of their customers’ needs. Our fans know that when they come to Talladega, we will do everything in our power to make sure they have an incredible time. We are the most competitive track in all of NASCAR, and we welcome Kim and his staff to the Talladega Superspeedway family.”

Jeff Poor is a graduate of Auburn University and works as the editor of Breitbart TV. Follow Jeff on Twitter @jeff_poor.

(Image: Talladega Superspeedway, View from O.V. Hill South Tower — Jeff Poor / Yellowhammer News)

10 hours ago

Hillary Clinton’s ‘clarification’ is actually a doubling-down on yet another foolish statement

During the election, Hillary Clinton whined about “deplorables”, blaming the hate-filled monsters who would never vote for a woman for her surprising loss. In her mind, and the minds of her supporters, the only person we can’t blame for her loss is Hillary Clinton. Her most recent silly gaffe was last week, where she spoke in front of an adoring crowd in India and called out white women, whose votes were effectively split, for being tools of their bosses, husbands and (somehow) their sons.

The media will tell you she has had a change of heart, some are even calling it an “apology“:

“As much as I hate the possibility, and hate saying it, it’s not that crazy when you think about our ongoing struggle to reach gender balance — even within the same household. I did not realize how hard it would hit many who heard it,” Clinton wrote in a lengthy Facebook post.


Why this matters: That’s not an apology or a clarification, she clearly thinks she is right. She cannot accept the fact that she was the worst presidential candidate of all time. Her real problem goes much deeper, she has been surrounded by a group of sycophants in her political orbit and in the media. We shouldn’t be angry at Hillary Clinton, we should pity her.  At this point, we might as well just start rattling off the people Clinton hasn’t blamed for her loss to Donald Trump, but that list would only have one entry: “Hillary Clinton”.

The details:

— As much as Clinton tried to imply white women voted as a homogeneous block, white women were far more split in their presidential choice than any other sub-group.

— 52 percent of white women voted for Trump and 43 percent voted for Clinton, this is hardly a monolith that you can group as all in for one candidate.

— Even after the election and eight months into Donald Trump’s term, Clinton was still wildly unpopular.

— In fact, Clinton was still more unpopular than Trump, only 30 percent of respondents viewed her favorably.

(Image: File)

Dale Jackson hosts a daily radio show from 7-11 a.m. on NewsTalk 770 AM/92.5 FM WVNN and a weekly television show, “Guerrilla Politics,” on WAAY-TV, both in North Alabama. Follow him @TheDaleJackson.

10 hours ago

‘Sex in the City’ star Cynthia Nixon running for governor

Former “Sex and the City” star Cynthia Nixon said on Twitter Monday that she’ll challenge Gov. Andrew Cuomo in New York’s Democratic primary in September.

Her announcement sets up a race pitting an openly gay liberal activist against a two-term incumbent with a $30 million war chest and possible presidential ambitions.

“We want our government to work again. On health care, ending massive incarceration, fixing our broken subway,” Nixon said in a video announcing her candidacy . “We are sick of politicians who care more about headlines and power than they do about us.”


Nixon has her work cut out for her. A Siena College poll released Monday showed Cuomo leading her by 66 percent to 19 percent among registered Democrats, and by a similar margin among self-identified liberals. Nixon did a little better among younger and upstate Democrats, but didn’t have more than a quarter of either group.

The poll of 772 registered voters was conducted March 11-16. The margin of error is plus-minus 4.0 percentage points.

Nixon has in recent months given speeches and interviews calling on Democrats nationally to run “bluer” in 2018 and carve out a strong, progressive liberal identity rather than being merely “the anti-Trump party.”

It’s a left-flank strategy that has had success against Cuomo in the past — nearly unknown liberal activist and law professor Zephyr Teachout garnered a surprising 34 percent of the vote in the 2014 Democratic primary.

“It could be a fight for the soul of the Democratic Party in some sense,” said Baruch College political scientist Douglas Muzzio.

Nixon, a 51-year-old Manhattan mother of three, is a longtime advocate for fairness in public school funding and fervent supporter of Democratic New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has frequently clashed with Cuomo. Her video shows her walking her young daughter to school as she talks about being a proud public school parent.

Last month, at the annual New York gala of Human Rights Campaign, which has endorsed Cuomo on, she took a backhanded stab at the governor’s record: “For all the pride that we take here in being such a blue state, New York has the single worst income inequality of any state in the country.”

More recently, she has been delving into issues of keen interest to New York City, the main blue stronghold in a state where suburban and rural towns upstate tend to run red.

One of those issues is transportation policy, which contributed to a plunge in Cuomo’s popularity last July amid his “summer of hell” forecast for New York City commuters facing ongoing transit breakdowns and delays.

The 60-year-old Cuomo had no immediate comment on Nixon’s candidacy. But recently, he mocked the celebrity status the Grammy, Emmy and Tony winner could bring to the race.

“Normally name recognition is relevant when it has some connection to the endeavor,” Cuomo told reporters earlier this month. “If it was just about name recognition, then I’m hoping that Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie and Billy Joel don’t get into the race.”

While Nixon has strong political connections and name recognition in the city that was the backdrop for her Emmy Award-winning role as lawyer Miranda Hobbes in the HBO comedy “Sex and the City,” her star power among upstate voters is less certain.

Jefrey Pollock, pollster and political adviser to Cuomo and other prominent Democrats, said that celebrity isn’t likely to trump governing experience in the voting booth.

“Over and over in our research, Democratic primary voters say they’re not looking for an outsider because they look to Washington, D.C., and see what the outsider has meant to this country,” Pollock said.

Nixon won’t be the only celebrity candidate on the New York ballot. Former “Law and Order: SVU” actress Diane Neal is running for Congress as an independent in a Hudson Valley district.

The first task for Nixon, Muzzio said, is to launch a listening and talking tour.

“She can’t be the celebrity glamour girl,” he said. “She’s got to get out there and get exposure upstate.”

(Image: Metropolitan Transportation Authority of the State of New York/Flickr)

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)