What we can learn from the Alabama & Georgia quarterbacks’ post-game responses


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COLLEGE FOOTBALL’S BIG NIGHT AND BIG PRAISE FOR GOD

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, last Monday night, Alabama was heard around the world as Nick Saban won his sixth national championship. He now ties Bear Bryant.

DR. REEDER: Yeah, it was quite an event. It is an event in the midst of the city I serve, Birmingham, and my congregation, which is about 55/60 percent Auburn, 40 percent Alabama. I had to make a commitment and I said, “My commitment is this: I am not going to choose,” so I have the great joy of being able to pull for both Alabama and Auburn. A guy actually wrote me an email afterward and said, “I bet you’re an Alabama fan now.” Well, what I told my congregation when I came is, “Go Pirates.” People may not know this, but you live in Greenville, North Carolina and I went to East Carolina, my basic statement is always, “Since I’ve been here, I’ve loved Alabama and Auburn football, but it’s obvious that they’re scared of East Carolina because they refuse to schedule them each year.”

I will tell you this: I am a Tua fan and I am a Jake fan and I’m referring, of course, to the two true freshmen quarterbacks who performed in such a stellar fashion Monday night but, more than that, the way their perspective that was revealed in the post-game interview.

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, it was encouraging how both quarterbacks, in the post-game show, their comments gave glory to God.

Tua Tagovailoa: “First and foremost, I’d like to thank my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. With him, all things are possible. That’s what happened tonight. All glory goes to God. I can’t describe what He has done for me and my family.”

DR. REEDER: And after that he was actually asked a number of questions and he kept coming back to a God-centered world and life view. It was really encouraging. He actually apologized to his parents that he couldn’t say them first – he wanted to honor the Lord first. This young man from Hawaii is quite the talent, with a brother, Bo, coaching move was brought in and, with his courage, was able to follow through.

And, by the way, Jalen Hurts, the existing quarterback, his response was admirable in how he exhibited a team player attitude and was his No. 1 encourager in his route of success last night, even though he had replaced him.

However, what I wanted to really point out was his ability to do that and, not only that, the Jake Fromm response, too.

TOM LAMPRECHT: Indeed. Jake Fromm, who was the quarterback for the Georgia Bulldogs, said in a post-game tweet, “God is good all the time and all the time God is good. So thankful for an incredible season with all these seniors who have given so much to this university. They’ve set the standard for University of Georgia football. We will be back. Love my teammates and go Dawgs.”

DR. REEDER: Unlike many fans that I meet – football becomes a religion – but these two young men, one in victory and one in defeat, handled this so absolutely with equilibrium and with clarity and did what I love to see and that is when people are blessed of the Lord to be successful or blessed of the Lord with the adversity of defeat and failure, are able to keep their eyes on the Lord and exalt the Lord and use it as a platform to honor the Lord. I am a Tua and a Jake fan.

HOPE FOR FUTURE ATHLETES

I’m a fan of both of these young men and pray that the coming years of their success, they will continue to manifest not only the desire to honor Christ in every opportunity, both of them then immediately moved to their teammates and their coaches to honor them and then they kept avoiding personal promotion.

I’m just praying that they will continue to do that and to set a standard for our kids that are watching the athletes in the world today and to see that. I am hoping that opens up the hearts of a lot of young men and women who have athletic aspirations to see what happens when you have a heart-embraced world and life view that comes through in victory and defeat.

TRUMP’S IMPORTANT PRO-LIFE ACHIEVEMENTS

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, in our closing minutes, I’d like to switch gears. Coming up in just a couple of weeks is Sanctity of Life Sunday. We’ll also be noting on the calendar the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision – how many millions of lives have been taken as a result – but there’s actually some good news on the horizon.

Let me give you a couple of headlines. One, President Donald Trump has been recognized as Pro-Life Person of the Year for 2017. One of the most prominent pro-life groups in America has given its award to Trump, declaring him Pro-Life Person of the Year. That, according to Operation Rescue.

Another important headline, Harry, out of The Daily Wire, “Pro-life win on horizon: first state to be abortion clinic-free, the State of Kentucky.”

DR. REEDER: First of all, congratulations to President Trump. If you look at his actions since president in his first year, he has actually advanced the pro-life cause further, I believe, than any president. Now, we’ve had a number of presidents who affirmed their pro-life position, but he has advanced it with his Appeals Court and Supreme Court appointments, with his removal of the abortion mandate funding of the Obamacare, with other executive orders, and the Justice Department now doing its investigation of Planned Parenthood. That is rightly awarded to him and I’m grateful for what he’s done.

STATES SHUTTING DOWN ABORTION CLINICS

I’m also grateful for your second headline, to see a state become abortion clinic-free – in other words, to remove another genocidal business – Kentucky is about to take its place along with, I believe, it’s seven other states. And by the way, in Alabama, we are getting close, also. We’re close to removing all abortion clinics in Birmingham.

And, if you don’t mind, let me go ahead and say this: Saturday at 10:45 will be our gathering at Brother Brian Park, the legendary pastor of Third Presbyterian Church, the park that’s named for him who used to walk the streets to pray for the city. I love the full-orbed approach in Birmingham of adoption of ministry and of mercy to women in crisis, the picketing of the abortion clinics and now we’re closing them down – I think we’re down to one – the organizations that are speaking for the pro-life and moving forth legislation in local and state government. It’s been absolutely wonderful, Tom, to see all of that take place.

TOM LAMPRECHT: Harry, if you go back to the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, many people prayed and hoped that we would get a Supreme Court decision, some sort of federal mandate/guidance/directive that would stop abortion. God has chosen a different path: one by one, we see these abortion clinics shutting down.

MINISTRY MUST EXTEND TO MEN, WOMEN, CHILDREN

DR. REEDER: And babies being saved one by one, as well, and women in crisis pregnancy being ministered to one by one, and the fathers who are certainly responsible for this, who have fathered these children. And the fact that the secular elite were absolutely convinced, once they got the judicial case established that this issue would disappear – the death industry upon unborn children would become a part of our culture.

Well, the fact is, it hasn’t and now, these many years later, and in the terrible, terrible, grievous statistic of 60+ million children who have lost their lives because they “were inconvenient,” the mistakes of the sexual revolution that had to be eliminated and then the whole notion that no one is worth living unless somebody wants them instead of the reality that life is sacred and every life is sacred because every life comes with the stamp of the image of God upon it. And I am grateful for what’s happening in Kentucky.

That’s where we are and we will continue to speak to these matters with public policy, all under the mission of the church with the focus of the mission of the church to actually win abortion doctors, win women, win men and win the children that are saved with the Gospel of Jesus Christ – that we love life because we have the gift of eternal life and we can tell you about the one who can give you the salvation from your sins and grant you eternal life. And not only forgive us of our sins, but transform our lives by embracing a new life for Christ that honors life.

 

Dr. Harry L. Reeder III is the Senior Pastor of Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham.

This podcast was transcribed by Jessica Havin. Jessica is editorial assistant for Yellowhammer News. Jessica has transcribed some of the top podcasts in the country and her work has been featured in a New York Times Bestseller.

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11 hours ago

Conservatives should stop using the phrase ‘fake news’

Liberals have overused the word “racist” so much that the adjective now lacks any commonly agreed upon definition, and that’s a shame because we need words — especially that word — to mean something.

Conservatives have now done the same thing with the phrase “fake news.”

And we need to stop.

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Are there racists? Of course, and where they are found, the label should indeed apply. The Alt-Right’s Richard Spencer is a racist. So is Jared Taylor.

But you’re not a racist if you believe our country should have borders. Or if you support law enforcement. Or if you believe in school choice.

Calling you a racist for supporting those things is the left’s attempt at shutting off debate and banishing those who advocate for such ideas.

Is there fake news? Of course, and just like the word “racist,” when it’s found, the label should apply. Dan Rather’s infamous story about George W. Bush’s record in the Air National Guard is a perfect example. It wasn’t true.

But news isn’t fake if it’s simply something you don’t like or would rather not hear. Or if it challenges your perspectives. Or if it, heaven forbid, says something unflattering about the president.

A racist is someone who actually hates people of another color and wishes them ill. Most people called ‘racist’ today are nothing of the sort.

Fake news means the story is a total fabrication. A lie. Complete fiction. Most stories called ‘fake news’ are also nothing of the sort.

In both cases, people making the charge simply want to delegitimize their opponent’s argument rather than make the mental and emotional effort to challenge their ideas.

The casualty of such total weakness is not just words, but thought itself.

As our fellow Alabamian Helen Keller wrote in her memoir, she wasn’t able to really think until words entered her mind that day at the water pump.

Words opened Helen Keller’s mind.

Don’t allow words to close yours.

12 hours ago

Grand jury considers Alabama woman’s stabbing of husband with sword

A grand jury in Alabama will hear the case of a woman accused of fatally stabbing her husband with a sword.

Authorities say 50-year-old Jeannette Hale stabbed her husband, Mark, in the chest while he played a guitar in their home on April 2.

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Lawrence County Sheriff Gene Mitchell tells AL.com that responding deputies found Mark Hale bleeding on their front porch. The sword was in the yard.

Mitchell says the husband later died at a hospital. An autopsy released Wednesday said the cause was complications of being stabbed.

The sheriff says Jeanette Hale was arrested on charges involving domestic violence and drugs.

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

13 hours ago

Poly Sci 101: Gov. Ivey’s monument ad is a prime case of political framing

“Special interests” and “politically correct nonsense” are responsible for efforts to remove Confederate monuments from public spaces, Gov. Kay Ivey says in a recent campaign ad.

At a campaign appearance earlier this week in Foley, Ivey made similar statements on the issue.

“We must learn from our history. And we don’t need folks in Washington or out of state liberals telling us what to do in Alabama,” she said, according to Fox 10 News. “I believe it’s more important that if we want to get where we want to go, we’ve got to understand where we’ve been. And I believe that the people of Alabama agree with that decision and support protecting all of our historical monuments.”

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The conversation about Confederate monuments raises some intellectually and morally stimulating questions: What is their function? Do they function as objects of praise or as objects of historical memory? Who ought to determine whether they stay or go?

I’ll leave those questions aside for now because I want to address how Gov. Ivey has articulated the monuments issue.

George Lakoff is a cognitive scientist who has done a lot of research examining how politics and language intersect, particularly how language is used by individuals and groups to present their opponents in ways that welcome easy refutation. Usually, this means the misrepresentation of those ideas or opponents or, at the very least, a simplistic representation of them.

Lakoff refers to this as the act of “framing,” calling “frames” the arguments or scenarios set up by framing.

Here are a few assumptions that Ivey’s frame makes: Monuments are not only a way to learn from our history, but they are central to learning from our history; non-Alabamians and political enemies are trying to tell us what to do in advocating for monuments’ removal; monuments are a way to ensure that Alabama gets “where it wants to go,” politically, socially, culturally; that Alabamians are opposed to monument removal.

There are obvious political benefits to framing the issue this way. Knowing our history is clearly important. Who could argue that? Alabama is a sovereign state. Nobody wants outsiders tampering with decision-making.

What the frame excludes is an argument demonstrating why monuments are central to learning from our history, and how their removal would prevent us from learning from our history. It also excludes names of individuals or groups who have come from afar to tell us what to do.

It’s undeniable that folks from all around the country want Confederate monuments removed all around the country, and some may even be funding that effort from afar, but the major weakness of Ivey’s frame is a failure to acknowledge the Alabamians who are arguing for monument removal.

Birmingham City officials have advocated their removal.

Tuskegee Mayor Tony Haygood said the city has considered the removal of a Confederate soldier monument in the middle of town.

A Tuskegee graduate wrote a petition last year to the have the same monument removed. The petition garnered more than 1,000 signatures.

City officials in Selma have shown a similar resolve over the years, if not to have a monument removed then to cease the city’s contribution to its maintenance.  

Obviously, Ivey doesn’t have time in a 30-second ad to deconstruct the monument debate’s complexity, and I understand that, but her frame doesn’t accurately articulate who is representing the monument removal view in Alabama.

@jeremywbeaman is a contributing writer for Yellowhammer News

13 hours ago

Alabama legislators should follow Iowa’s lead in protecting the unborn

“If we conservatives truly believe abortion is what we say it is — the butchering of an unborn person — then ending the practice must be our top priority.”

Those were the words of Yellowhammer’s very own J. Pepper Bryars last week in an article he wrote after Congress failed, once again, to ban Planned Parenthood from receiving federal dollars.

Bryars couldn’t have been more accurate in his criticism, but I believe his words are also an indictment of the entire pro-life movement. For far too long we have played defense on the issue of abortion, attempting to hold the status quo while never really producing any substantial legislation on the issue. Not since Casey in June of 1992 have we attempted to make any real challenge to Roe v. Wade.

It’s for that reason that Alabama should follow in the footsteps of the lawmakers from our sister state of Iowa, who last month passed one of the strongest pro-life bills we have seen in decades.

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Iowa Senate bill 2281 (the text of which can be found here), known as the Heartbeat Billwould legally prevent all abortions after the first detectable fetal heartbeat has been discovered, except in the very rare case of a medical emergency.

In other words, only when it is concluded by medical personnel that the life of the mother is in danger can an abortion be performed. Not only does it not make the exception for rape and incest as pro-choice legislators like to commonly reference, but it would also charge any doctor that performs an abortion after a fetal heartbeat has been detected with a Class D felony, punishable by up to 5 years in prison.

Why this matters: The earliest fetal heartbeats can be detected is 5-6 weeks after conception, which is right about the time most women are initially discovering they are pregnant. However, new research from the University of Oxford suggests that a fetal heartbeat may be detected as early as 16 days after conception. With the risk of women dying during childbirth decreasing significantly since the 1970s and the recent trends in fetal research, it is clear that a bill such as this could effectively end 99% of abortions statewide.

Also, by creating legislation that defines life as beginning the moment the first detectable heartbeat is discovered we will be using the same red line that is already in use by most professionals in the medical community.

If I were driving home from work one night and had a terrible car accident, medical personnel after arriving on scene and finding me unconscious would immediately check for a pulse indicating whether I had a detectable heartbeat. If a detectable heartbeat is found, I would be considered a living person. If a heartbeat can be used by the medical community as a means of declaring when a person is living after birth, then it makes no sense why we wouldn’t use the same scientifically backed means of declaring life prior to birth.

For far too long the pro-life movement has focused on arguments surrounding fetal viability and gestational timelines, allowing our opponents on the issue the opportunity to define the terms of the debate for us.

Finally, simply passing a bill such as Iowa’s heartbeat bill would only be the beginning of the fight. There is no doubt that the ACLU, SPLC, and every pro-choice organization in the country would descend upon our state capital like locust filing every legal challenge to the bill imaginable. They would organize large protests where people in hats resembling female genitalia will gnash their teeth, but the resulting legal challenge would finally give us the opportunity to eventually stand before the Supreme Court and reargue the merits of the worst decision it has produced since Plessy v. Ferguson.

So, it is incumbent upon our legislators to truly reflect on the very pointed philosophical question Bryars raised regarding what we truly believe as conservatives on the issue of protecting unborn life.

Do you, Governor Kay Ivey, believe as you so eloquently stated that “fighting for our freedoms means fighting for the unborn”?

Do the members of our State Legislature and the pro-life community believe this as well?

If so, then the time has long since passed for us to stand by our words and attack Roe at its very core.

@dannybritton256 is a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and lives in Athens.

13 hours ago

Alabama forward Braxton Key says he will transfer

Alabama sophomore forward Braxton Key is leaving the team and plans to transfer.

Crimson Tide coach Avery Johnson said Friday Key has been granted his release. He says Key “certainly has a bright future, but he has to do what’s best for him.”

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Key started 17 games last season after missing the first 10 with a knee injury. He averaged 7.0 points and 5.3 rebounds per game.

He led the Tide in scoring his first season and was named to the Southeastern Conference’s all-freshman team. Key averaged 12 points and 5.7 rebounds as a freshman while ranking second on the team in assists.

He says it wasn’t an easy decision to make.

The Tide is also expected to lose point guard Collin Sexton, who declared for the draft.

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)