4 years ago

Alabama Rep. Alvin Holmes says men should be allowed to marry mules (with audio)

Alvin Holmes

Alabama State Rep. Alvin Holmes, D-Montgomery, has been in the news a lot lately for his bigoted comments on everything from Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to interracial adoption, but nothing can compare to what Holmes said on the radio last week when presented with the opportunity to clarify his position on marriage.

“Now, I’m for interracial marriage,” Holmes said after a long diatribe claiming most white Alabamians are not. “I’m for same-sex marriage. I’m the one that introduced the bill to have same-sex marriage. I don’t care who marry who. If a man meet a little mule and he wanna get married to the little mule, as long as he and the little mule get along all right, that’s fine with me. It doesn’t bother me any kind of way.”

AUDIO: (Holmes’ comments begin around the 2-minute mark)

Holmes stunning comments come on the heels of a two-month run during which the long-time state representative has seemingly sought to propel himself into the national spotlight as one of the left’s preeminent race baiters.

Holmes started by going to the microphone on the floor of the Alabama House to call Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas an “Uncle Tom” and to criticize him for marrying a white woman.

A few days later, Sean Hannity sent David Webb, a Fox News correspondent, to Alabama to ask Rep. Holmes if he stood by his description of Justice Thomas as an “Uncle Tom.”

(Above: Rep. Holmes talks about his racist comments on HANNITY)

“Yes I do,” Holmes replied without hesitation. “I think Justice Thomas on the United States Supreme Court is an Uncle Tom. A black man allowed himself to be used to carry the message of a white man, which is against the interests of black people in America. In my opinion that’s an Unlce Tom. In my opinion, Clarence Thomas is a very prolific Uncle Tom.”

Webb then asked Holmes to respond to a recent controversy in which the North Carolina NAACP president called black Republican US Senator Tim Scott a ventriloquist’s “dummy.” Holmes seemed to agree with the NAACP official’s characterization of Sen. Scott, and said it was about Scott not being a role model for the next generation of black leaders.

“If you get to be a United States senator, and every position you take is the position that the white folks tell you to take, what incentive is that going to be for young blacks?” Holmes asked.

Webb told Hannity that it was clear Holmes was not very familiar with the positions taken by Sen. Scott on specific issues, but he decided to ask Holmes how he knows Sen. Scott always takes the positions that the “white folks” tell him to take.

“Because every report I have read, he goes by what the white people been telling him,” Holmes replied. “If a white holding those positions votes against the interests of black people, we call them racist. If a black is in a position and votes against the interests of black people, we call him an Uncle Tom.”

Webb, a black conservative activist and commentator, called Holmes’ statements “hypocritical” and “disingenuous,” among other things.

A few weeks later during a debate in the Alabama House of Representatives about a pro-life bill, Holmes went to the mic again, the time to claim that white pro-lifers in the Legislature would be in favor of aborting a child if their own daughters or granddaughters got pregnant by a black man.

“Ninety-nine percent of the all of the white people in here are going to raise their hand that they are against abortion,” Holmes said. “On the other hand, 99 percent of the whites who are sitting in here now, if their daughter got pregnant by a black man, they are going to make their daughter have an abortion.”


Holmes also offered $100,000 to anyone who could show him “a bunch of whites” who had adopted black babies in Alabama.

A group of families who had adopted children of a different race launched a Facebook page called “Faces of Families in Alabama” to prove Holmes wrong, and boy did they ever.

Mixed-race families from all over the state sent in pictures and over 13,000 people “liked” the page in a bout a week-and-a-half.

Last week, Faces of Families held a rally on the steps of the Alabama State House to prove Holmes wrong once and for all. Multi-racial adoptive families from all across Alabama showed up, but even though Holmes had been invited to attend, he was nowhere to be found.

Adoption Rally

In spite of the avalanche of evidence presented over the last several weeks, Holmes has still not changed his position.

”The majority of the white people in the state of Alabama are against adopting black children,” he once again told a local television station.

Beverly Owings, an adoptive mom who has a 13-year-old bi-racial daughter, said Holmes “should have to put his money where his mouth is,” but added that the Faces of Families rally was “not about money, but about changing Holmes opinion. And about getting out the word about how many children are available for adoption in Alabama.”

Mrs. Owings and her husband were guests on WVAS, a local radio station, last week to talk about the entire sequence of events when Rep. Holmes decided to call in to the show to defend his position.

“Do you think the white people of Alabama would let me adopt a white baby?” he asked. “Do you think the white folks in Alabama, the white authorities will permit Alvin Holmes to adopt a white baby in Alabama? Now just answer that yes or no.”

Owings responded to Holmes’ question with a “yes.” Holmes broke out into laughter. “I will tell you,” Owings continued, “after what we went through in the adoption process, if I had made the negative, racist statements that you have made, then no, they would not have allowed me to adopt a biracial child.”

Holmes dismissed the rally the inter-racial adoptive families organized, saying, “You can get a little handful of folks to any kind of rally … you can have a rally for Mussolini.”

What do you think about Rep. Holmes’ comments? Let us know in the comments or by tweeting @YHPolitics.

Follow Cliff on Twitter @Cliff_Sims

Human trafficking bill that would impose severe penalties for obstruction is step closer to becoming law

Anyone who obstructs a human trafficking investigation in Alabama could be met with the same penalties as the traffickers if the governor signs a bill that passed the House this week with near unanimous support.

The bill, which already passed the Senate, increases penalties in place for those who obstruct, interfere with, prevent, or otherwise get in the way of law enforcement’s investigation into the practice that includes child sex trafficking.

Under current law, such obstruction is only a Class C felony and could result in just one year in prison. The new legislation would increase the maximum offense to a Class A felony, with a minimum jail sentence of ten years.


Senator Cam Ward (R-Alabaster) sponsored the bill and said he is proud that the Alabama Legislature made this a priority.

“This week we’ve taken another crucial step in ending this horrific practice,” Ward said in a statement. “By increasing penalties for those who would aid traffickers, we will hold them just as accountable as the traffickers themselves.”

Human trafficking victims are often children who are trafficked into sexual exploitation at an average age between 11-14 years old, according to the Alabama Human Trafficking Task Force.

“Most people assume, ‘Well, that doesn’t happen in my backyard,’” Ward said in an interview with Yellowhammer News when the bill was first introduced. “…It’s everywhere in our state, but there’s low awareness as to how bad it really is.”

Just this week, a Decatur man pled guilty to child sex trafficking and other charges related to his plan to kidnap, rape and kill a mother and sell her 14-year-old daughter to a Memphis pimp, according to horrifying details reported by the Decatur Daily.

Brian David “Blaze” Boersma’s plan was thwarted because an informant, who Boersma recruited to help him with his plan, alerted the FBI.

“Oftentimes it’s like what we say with terrorism,” Ward said. “If you see something suspicious, tell somebody, because a lot of times, trafficking can take place right underneath our noses in our communities.”

The legislation to increase penalties for obstructing human trafficking investigations was delivered to Governor Kay Ivey for her signature Wednesday afternoon.

Rachel Blackmon Bryars is managing editor of Yellowhammer News.

Bill funds ‘active shooter’ training for local law enforcement, school faculty and staff, and students

For much of the year, the safety of our students rests in the hands of the faculty, staff, and resource officers at our schools.  Without a shadow of a doubt, the people who know best how to protect our schools are the teachers, parents, administrators, police officers, and students in their own communities.

In February, the tragic shooting in Parkland, Florida resonated throughout our communities, highlighting a disturbing trend of individuals who clearly show signs of grave mental instability falling through the cracks.

Sadly, this incident likely could have been avoided had there been better oversight at every level of law enforcement. From the top down, we failed these students by not heeding the warning signs and working together as a team to ensure our students’ safety.


In response to this incident, the House recently passed the Student, Teacher’s Officer’s Prevention (STOP) School Violence Act, which Bill  to help identify and prevent school violence before these tragic events occur.

First, the STOP School Violence Act provides funding for training to prevent student violence, including training for local law enforcement officers, school personnel, and students in the event of an emergency.  This training would be designed to give students and school personnel the ability to recognize and respond quickly to warning signs of violent behavior and would include active shooter training.

Second, the bill provides funding for technology and equipment to improve school security.  This includes the development and operation of anonymous reporting systems, as well as the installation of metal detectors, locks, and other preventative technologies to keep schools secure.

The legislation also authorizes funding for school threat assessment and crisis intervention teams for school personnel to respond to threats before they become real-time incidents.  Recognizing the warning signs of violent, threatening behavior and having the proper resources to address it on the front end can prevent these tragedies from ever occurring.

Finally, the STOP School Violence Act provides funding to support law enforcement coordination efforts, particularly the officers who already staff schools.  From the federal level all the way down to our local law enforcement, we need to ensure there is accountability and communication when handling violent behavior.

Many of our local schools are already reevaluating their security measures and taking additional steps to promote a safe learning environment for our students.  Our students’ safety and security should always remain a top priority, and I believe it is imperative that our local schools have the most appropriate resources in place in the event of an emergency.

As we look for ways to prevent these terrible tragedies, I am open to additional solutions to address the underlying issues that cause these events to occur.  That said, I remain steadfastly committed to upholding the individual right of all law-abiding Americans to keep and bear arms.  Millions of Americans should not have their Second Amendment rights infringed upon due to the bad actions of a few individuals.

Rather, I believe we should focus on addressing mental health issues and combatting the role of violence in our modern culture, such as the prevalence of violent video games that normalize this behavior for our young students, and promoting commonsense solutions that will address the larger issues of mental health so that those with mental illness do not fall through the cracks.

There is still work to be done to ensure each child’s safety and well-being while attending classes. However, I am proud that we have taken this action in the House to promote a safe, secure learning environment for our children.

U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne is a Republican from Fairhope. 

(Image: File)

50 mins ago

Ex-Tuskegee football coach accused of selling cocaine, pot

A former assistant football coach at Tuskegee University is accused of selling cocaine and marijuana in Alabama.

U.S. Attorney Louis V. Franklin Sr. says in a statement that 33-year-old Ramone Jardon Nickerson was arrested Wednesday. Prosecutors say the Phenix City man was indicted by a grand jury after being found with roughly 3 ounces of cocaine, a pound of marijuana and a .40-caliber handgun March 13 in Russell County.


Tuskegee’s website says the alumnus coached cornerbacks and was a four-year starter before joining the coaching staff in 2006.

If convicted, Nickerson could be sentenced to a maximum 20 years in prison for drug trafficking charges and at least 5 years for a related gun charge. There’s no parole in the federal system.

It is unclear if Nickerson has a lawyer.

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

1 hour ago

We have plenty of gun bills, we lack action

Is the Alabama legislature serious about dealing with the issue of school violence? If they are, it sure doesn’t seem like it. Yes, we have bills, lots of bills, some good and some bad. We have a bill about allowing teachers to carry, a bill about allowing volunteers to carry, a bill about metal detectors, a bill about banning semi-automatics, and a bill on age-limits. So we have bills, but apparently, we don’t have time. Maybe a special session can get it done:

“Not dissuaded by the announcement, Ainsworth floated the idea of a special session addressing school safety over the summer, and the Guntersville representative was darting around the chamber on Wednesday with petition and pen in hand,” reported Sam Mattison of Alabama Political Reporter.

Why this matters: A special session? For what? Do these legislators not know where they stand on banning semi-automatics or allowing teachers to carry firearms? Yes, these are controversial issues, but they aren’t hard to figure out whether you support them or not.


The legislature piddled around on this legislation and is letting the clock run out. Now everyone gets to go back to their district and talk about how they’re pro-gun/anti-gun legislation didn’t pass, but if we send them back for four more years they can get the job done.

The details:

— The length of the legislative session is 30 meeting days over a 105 day period.

— The House Public Safety Committee was unable to meet on gun bills on Wednesday because not enough members showed up.

— Depending on the source, a special session would cost taxpayers roughly $400,000.

— If Governor Kay Ivey calls a special session, and no one thinks she will, it will be limited to whatever she specifically puts in the “call”.

Dale Jackson hosts a daily radio show from 7-11 a.m. on NewsTalk 770 AM/92.5 FM WVNN and a weekly television show, “Guerrilla Politics,” on WAAY-TV, both in North Alabama. Follow him @TheDaleJackson.

2 hours ago

Alabama House approves school security money

Schools could soon be able to tap a state technology fund for security measures such as paying for school resource officers or surveillance cameras.

The Alabama House of Representatives on Thursday voted 96-4 for the bill. The Alabama Senate will now consider whether to go along with House changes to the proposal.


The legislation by Republican Sen. Trip Pittman of Montrose is one of the few school security proposals nearing final passage in the Alabama Legislature.

According the Legislative Services Agency, schools received a total of $21.4 million from the fund in 2016, but no money in 2017. A separate bill would steer an additional $58.8 million to the fund.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has announced support for the legislation.

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)