5 months ago

Read Gov. Kay Ivey’s entire 2020 State of the State Address

MONTGOMERY — Starting at approximately 6:30 p.m. CST on Tuesday, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey delivered her 2020 State of the State Address from the Old House Chamber inside the State Capitol.

Major themes of the address covered the Rebuild Alabama Act that was enacted last year, criminal justice/corrections reform, education reform (including teacher pay raises), respect for law enforcement, the 2020 Census, statewide Amendment One on the March 3 ballot, broadband, rural healthcare, mental health and gambling/the lottery.

Video of the address is available here.

You can read Ivey’s entire address as prepared, as follows:

Lieutenant Governor Ainsworth, Pro Tempore Marsh, Speaker McCutcheon, Speaker Pro Tempore Gaston, members of the Alabama Legislature, Chief Justice Parker, justices of the Alabama Supreme Court, distinguished guests – and my fellow Alabamians:

Thank you for allowing me to address you — and the 4.8 million other citizens for whom we all work —with an update on this place we know and love, our Sweet Home, Alabama!

As you can see, I’m working with one arm – not tied behind my back – just tied up! But, as I always say, there’sno step too high for a high stepper! I’ll be fine.

Last month, I had the pleasure of joining you — and many others from around the state — in participating inAlabama’s Bicentennial Celebration.

Thanks to you, we not only marked our first 200 years in fine fashion, but, together, we began writing the first chapter of our next century. And with the continued involvement of all our people — and with God’s continuedblessings — there is every reason to believe that our third century will be our best yet!

Governor Thomas Kilby, Alabama’s 36th governor, stepped onto this very spot — in this historic chamber — one hundred years ago to speak to the people of our state about what Alabama’s second century might look like.

Like me, Governor Kilby had served as Alabama’s Lieutenant Governor prior to being elected governor. Hewould go on to increase funding for public education and public health, invest in new roads and bridges, while also devoting more attention and additional dollars to law enforcement and yes, even to build a new prison.

Governor Kilby understood that government action can oftentimes become the engine for economic expansion and that education is the key to both economic and social success.

As the old saying goes, “the more things change, the more they stay the same.”

Members of the Legislature, on this first day of the 2020 legislative session, we can be confident with our plans to build on our past as we step boldly into a new century for our great state. Our 3rd century begins with a strong, robust economy and a renewed commitment to look for new opportunities to answer old challenges, many of which have been around for decades.

Shortly after becoming your governor in April 2017, I realized that our great state had ignored too many problems for far too long. We had put Band-Aids and duct tape on old ideas, old roads and bridges, and tired old prisons long enough.

While these challenges can seem daunting, we know that one person can make a difference if you remain true to your core values. A challenge is an unmet opportunity. For me, those are to always tell the truth, to level with the people of Alabama and always shoot straight, and to not be afraid to take on difficult challenges.

I believed then — as today — that Alabamians were ready to do big things!

Each one of you – in one way or another – confirmed these beliefs with what, together, we achieved during our first Legislative Session of the Quadrennium last year.

And for that reason — and a whole lot more — I am proud and extremely pleased to report to you tonight that the State of our State is strong and growing.

Early on, I made one of the most important decisions I would make as your governor, and that was to begin regular meetings with the Bipartisan Leadership of both the House and Senate.

Look, no one here will be shocked to learn that our two political parties don’t always see eye-to-eye.

But unlike what we’ve seen nationally, I knew that no one party has a monopoly on good ideas. And I felt —and time has proven me correct — that these bipartisan meetings would help us come up with bipartisansolutions on everything from infrastructure funding to hopefully improving our state’s education system.

Success breeds success. And there is no better time to think big – and be bold – than now! Our future generations depend on us to do so.

A prime example of the benefit of working together was Rebuild Alabama.

Many pundits – and longtime observers of the Legislature – noted that the first session of the Quadrennium last spring was one of the most productive in decades.

To that end, I want to sincerely thank each of you for helping us address one problem that other legislatures and governors before us put off for 27 years… dealing openly and honestly with our aging, crumbling infrastructure.

In recent weeks and months, we have announced the state’s portion of $122 million worth of road and bridge projects in more than 48 of Alabama’s 67 counties. And this is just six months after the new revenue begancoming in.

And as I promised the people of Alabama on the day I signed this bill into law, Rebuild Alabama will only be spent on building roads and bridges. And, in fact, we added strong accountability measures to make certain of this.

It was the first of many bipartisan efforts that we accomplished last year. And the good news is Alabama still has one of the lowest gas prices of any state in the nation!

One of my top priorities for this upcoming session is tackling another problem that others have either chosen to ignore or been unable to solve.

Both my strong faith in the Lord – and a heartfelt concern for basic human rights – gives me a sense of urgency to address our longstanding challenges within our criminal justice system. Ladies and gentlemen, we simply cannot afford to wait any longer to tackle this problem… and failure is not an option.

Thanks to the support of the Alabama Legislature, we made good progress during the last session to address theissue of understaffing. I’m pleased to report that our recruiting and retention efforts are improving and moving in the right direction.

Over the past seven months, the Criminal Justice Study Group I appointed last year analyzed many of the crucial components necessary to address the needs to rehabilitate those within our prison system.

I am exceptionally proud of the hard work – and tireless efforts – of Justice Champ Lyons and Senators Chambliss, Ward and Singleton and Representatives Rowe, Hill, and England – for their willingness to put any preconceptions aside, leave politics at the door and work together for what is truly in the best interests of our state.

I look forward to working with the Legislature – and others – on bills specifically designed to address some of these issues.

Currently, work is well underway in addressing our antiquated and crumbling prison infrastructure. In the past few weeks, I visited Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore and Tutwiler Prison for Women in Wetumpka to see these issues firsthand.

Some of our worst, most over-crowded facilities – one of which was built more than 90 years ago — were never designed for the number of violent offenders we have today.

That is why I tasked Commissioner Dunn to spearhead the efforts to build three new prisons that will transition our facilities from warehousing inmates to rehabilitating people.

Ladies and gentlemen, Alabama has no choice but to reinvent our corrections system by replacing outdated and unsafe facilities that pose a great risk to public safety – and inhibit development of programs for inmate rehabilitation.

You’ve heard me say this before, this is an Alabama problem that must have an Alabama solution. I look forward to working with each of you.

To aid with successful reentry, the Community College System provides educational, technical and workforce training.

Ingram State, where I also visited recently, is the only postsecondary institution in the country that exclusively serves the incarcerated population.

Y’all, this partnership is changing lives. Just ask Brandie McCain.

In just one year, Brandie had completed the coursework needed for three logistics certificates at Ingram State. She was among the first group of Ingram students to earn a nationally recognized credential in logistics.

Brandie worked with Ingram’s job placement team to locate a job where she could use her newly acquiredskills. With their assistance, she landed a job at Wright Way Staffing in Fairfield, where she quickly moved up the ranks to become an office administrator and staff recruiter.

In her new role as an employer, Brandie is giving back by looking to hire other qualified Ingram State graduates. Brandie, please stand.

Members of the Alabama Legislature, please join me in welcoming Brandie McCain and applauding her incredible achievement!

As important as it is to fix our prisons, an even better investment, long-term, is building a world-class public education system.

In a few minutes, I’m going to outline my plans for how we will continue making investments toward this goal.But first, I want to, once again, level with you, the Members of the Legislature, and perhaps more importantly, with the people of Alabama.

During last year’s session, the Legislature gave the voters of Alabama an opportunity to help move oureducation system in a bold, new direction, by having an opportunity to vote on AMENDMENT ONE, which will be on the March 3rd primary ballot.

Unfortunately, we’ve gotten all-too-complacent to being at or near the bottom of national education rankings.

Ask yourself this question: Is there any high school in Alabama, much less any college or university, that would continue to keep a head coach who produced teams that were consistently dead last? Would Auburn or Alabama?

Sadly, too many of our third graders are not proficient in reading. In fact, according to the Nation’s ReportCard, we are 49th in the nation in reading and we are 52nd in the nation in math! And it only gets worse as theyget older… too many of our high school graduates simply aren’t ready for college or a career.

Let me be abundantly clear… this isn’t the fault of our hard-working teachers, principals or localsuperintendents…Folks, it starts at the top.

Alabama is one of only six states that still has an elected state school board and this board has selected 5 State Superintendents in the past 5 years.

Very simply, Amendment One will create term limits for the State Board and no member will serve more than two six-year terms, thus bringing fresh new ideas to the commission every few years.

Equally important, the newly constituted board will reflect the racial, gender and geographic diversity to reflect the make-up of students in our public school system.

There’s no other way to say it but our current system isn’t working.

For us to prepare today’s students for tomorrow’s opportunities, it is time we get serious: It’s time for creativity.
It’s time for accountability.
It’s time for stability.

It’s time to vote YES for Amendment One on March 3rd!
Despite our challenges in education, there has been much progress in some areas that are worth noting.

Since becoming your Governor in April 2017, the early results from our ‘Strong Start, Strong Finish’ initiativegive us every reason to be extremely optimistic.

When fully implemented, our students who get the best start possible, early on, are all but guaranteed that they have endless opportunities when pursuing their dreams post high school.

We all know that a world-class workforce begins with a world-class education system.
And the path that leads to that starts with a solid foundation constructed during the first 5 years of life.Just think… 95% of a child’s brain develops from birth to age 5.

My education budget that I am proposing will provide an additional $25 million dollars to expand our nationally-recognized First Class Pre-K program. This significant increase will expand the program by another 193 classrooms.

The bottom line is simple… Providing the tools for a great start in life will yield dividends for generations to come. Join me in applauding Secretary Jeana Ross and her team at the nationally-recognized Department ofEarly Childhood Education for having the nation’s best Pre-K program year after year.

Speaking of investing in our future, tonight I am proposing a $1 billion-dollar public school and college authority for K-12 education, as well as for our two- and four-year colleges and universities.

This money will be distributed on a formula basis to allow for much-needed capital improvements across the state. Equally important, this bond will not include any legislative earmarks for pet projects.

It has been almost 14 years since Alabama made an investment of this size by providing direct help to our schools. And whether it is for new construction, safety improvements or technology upgrades, this billion- dollar investment is coming at the right time and for the right reasons. I urge the members of the Legislature tohelp us make this investment a top priority for Alabama’s future. Our children are counting on us.

As I said before, the challenges we face with our public schools can’t be blamed on the teachers, theadministrators or the students. Our teachers are vitally important to our student’s future; I am living proof ofthis.

Growing up in Camden, my first-grade teacher was Mrs. Elise Hickey and she was a favorite. She left a lasting impact on my life by creating within me a passion for reading. It was because of her that led me to believe that if a child can learn to read, they can learn to do anything.

Ladies and gentlemen, Mrs. Hickey is one of the reasons I stand here as Governor!

Teachers in our state deserve to be compensated for their hard work. They instill a love of learning in our students and help them dream to become the next generation of doctors, economic developers, and small business owners.

That is why I am proposing a three percent pay raise for all teachers: pre-k through community college.

While no state in the nation has had more success in recent years attracting new investment and new industry, Alabama must redouble our efforts to ensure that we will have the most-sought after and qualified workforce in the country.

We have set an ambitious — but needed goal — of 500,000 employees with post-secondary credentials by 2025 that will stretch across all aspects of our education and workforce system. Our future depends on it.

Last year, an unemployed Army veteran, John Carroll, came to the Decatur Career Center hoping to turn his life around. He was going through some personal troubles and was out of work.

That’s when Carl Flemons, a veteran’s representative at the Department of Labor, stepped in.

Carl helped John work on his résumé, helped him apply for jobs, and most importantly, helped him restoreconfidence in his skills and abilities. With the Career Center’s help, John landed a job at a local doormanufacturing company.

Within a few months, thanks to his hard work and determination, he turned that opportunity into another job with LG Electronics as a safety coordinator. John is still employed there today even though a few months ago, he was facing considerable barriers to employment. Both John and Carl are with us this evening and we welcome you to your State Capitol!

Carl, your example of going above and beyond is representative of so many of our dedicated state employees. For that reason, and many others, I am also calling on our Legislature to provide a two percent increase for all state employees. This is the third straight year our state employees will see an increase in their paychecks.

Whether it is the State Trooper patrolling our highways or a social worker rescuing an abused child, we can be proud to have so many dedicated men and women who are giving their best to the people of Alabama.

And speaking of giving one’s best, please join me in congratulating the team at the Department of HumanResources, led by our dedicated Commissioner Nancy Buckner, for leading the nation two years in a row inplacing foster children in a permanent, loving home. It’s one thing to talk about helping a child; it’s anotherthing to actually do it.

Folks, I’d like to take this opportunity to recognize all the members of the Ivey Administration – let’s let themknow how much we appreciate their efforts and what they do everyday for our state.

As we all know, 2019 was an especially difficult year for those who wear a badge.
Seven members of the Alabama Law Enforcement community were killed in the line of duty.

These heroes exhibited the best virtues of our state – they were selfless, brave, dedicated and, in the end, willing to sacrifice their lives for all of us.

Representing these families, we have Mrs. Joanne Williams, the widow of Lowndes County Sheriff Big John Williams, with us tonight.

Mrs. Williams, thank you for being here.

Please join me as we observe a moment of silence to remember all those who died in the greatest act of selfless service to the people of Alabama.

And All of God’s people say, “Amen!”

Obviously, one of our most basic responsibilities of government is ensuring that we have a robust sector of public safety.

I’m proud to report that under the solid leadership of Secretary Hal Taylor, the Alabama Law EnforcementAgency has increased protection on our state’s roads and waterways.

For too long, we were operating on a bare-bones structure that increased delays in waiting for help on the side of the road and limited the number of highway patrol officers whose job is to keep us safe.

This has been a top focus of my administration and with your help, we have increased the number of Troopers from 365 to 435, a net increase of 19%! We have almost doubled our marine officers from 24 to 42! My budget will include additional funding to hire and train 50 additional sworn officers.

Since coming into office, I have made no secret of the fact that one of the most critical issues we face — one that will affect every single Alabamian — is the upcoming Census in March. 2020 will be a make or break year for our state.

I cannot emphasize enough the importance of what a full and accurate count in the 2020 Census means for ourState. These numbers have a direct impact on our state’s representation in the U.S. House of Representatives aswell as on the billions of dollars in federal funding…that’s billions with a “b”…that affect schools, communityprograms, health care, and job opportunities for our state.

Thanks to the leadership of ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell and his team, we are going all out to get everyone to be all in.

It is ever so important for every Alabamian to join me in saying “I Count” by completing a census form!Other important areas that are being worked on daily by my Administration:

Access to broadband; it is a top priority to continue increasing the availability of high-speed Internet throughout the state, especially in rural Alabama, through the Broadband Accessibility Fund.

While state government can’t do it alone— and we are counting on the help of our partners in the private sector— my budget will continue to provide funding to connect as many people as possible during the coming years.

Currently, some 220,000 Alabamians do not have any wired Internet providers where they live. Our efforts will not end until every Alabamian has access through high speed broadband.

Much as Governor Kilby increased funding in public health one hundred years ago, my budget will make a substantial investment in the area of health care… both rural health and mental health as well.

Another sign of our commitment to improving the lives of those who live in rural Alabama is my full support for a pilot program to incentivize primary care physicians and nurse practitioners to establish services in medically underserved areas.

I am calling on the Legislature to support my rural health care initiatives which, among other things, will help improve basic primary care in many deserving communities. By encouraging these medical professionals to build a practice in these areas, we can literally transform many small towns throughout the state.

And thanks to the innovative leadership being provided by Mental Health Commissioner Lynn Beshear and her team, I am also calling on the Legislature to provide funding to build three new crisis centers in the state. When open and fully staffed, these centers will become a safe haven for people facing mental health challenges; here, they can be stabilized and treated without being sent to a jail or the hospital.

Special thanks go to House Majority Leader Ledbetter and the members from both parties and both chambers who have been working with him to lead the charge to put additional emphasis on this important area of public service.

I am also proud that our Mental Health Department is partnering with the Department of Education to ensure weare promoting “Whole Child Wellness.”

The fact is…our students are with us for at least 8 hours a day and many come from a home-life that few of us can imagine. Our students are increasingly dealing with challenges and pressure for which most teachers aren’ttrained or prepared to deal with; these young people need our help and we are going to do our part.

As the Members of the Legislature begin this upcoming session, let me close my remarks tonight with a reminder, a challenge and a promise.

First the reminder:
We are starting our new century enjoying the best economy our state has ever had. Ever!

Thanks to the hard work of Commerce Secretary Greg Canfield and his team — as well as Labor Secretary Fitzgerald Washington and his folks — these are unquestionably the best of times.

We have the lowest unemployment rate in our 200-year history at 2.7 percent.
More than 82,000 of our fellow citizens are working today than were working just a year ago.

At the beginning of last year, economists predicted we would gain 27,000 jobs in 2019. In true Alabama fashion, our economy beat those expectations by gaining nearly 77,000 jobs! That, too, is a record for our state!

And fewer people are living in poverty than ever before.

Y’all, these results don’t just happen because we want them to. They are happening because we are workingtogether, more united than ever before.

Even so, there are some 60,000 Alabamians seeking employment opportunities. Still others are hoping to climb the next step up the economic ladder.

I say to everyone across our state who is still climbing – we will not leave you behind.

My reminder is that every challenge is an opportunity waiting for action. And while we are enjoying the best of times — and my budgets and these requests reflect that — we must prepare for a changing environment — one beyond our control — that recognizes times won’t always be this good.

To that end, here is my challenge.

For years, going back to 1999 when Governor Siegelman was promoting an Alabama lottery, we’ve beenhearing that expanding gaming in some form, perhaps a lottery — or maybe a compact with our Native American neighbors — would solve all our problems and provide money for all sorts of good ideas.

Keep in mind, the last time the Legislature gave the voters had an opportunity to cast their vote, the so-called“education lottery” was voted down by the people of Alabama by 54 to 46 percent. It wasn’t even close.

Since then we’ve heard promises of hundreds of millions of dollars — now we are up to a billion dollars — that would be available if the Legislature would give the people another opportunity to vote on a lottery or if I would negotiate a compact… If it were only that simple.

Many of our legislators were not even serving the last time a Governor had to declare our budgets in proration, making sweeping, across-the-board cuts. But I remember those times and let me tell you, we do not want to go back there.

That is why I will be signing an Executive Order to establish a small working group of some of Alabama’s mostdistinguished citizens, to begin working, to gather all the facts on how much money we could really gain if some form of gaming expansion occurred. Vetting on these individuals is already underway and I will be releasing these names in the coming days.

Like you, I’m fully aware that the four states which border us all have some form of gaming.

And neither you nor I are naïve enough to believe that we’re benefitting in any way when our people cross thestate line to bet on a game of chance.

While I, personally, have never believed we should fund essential state services on such an unstable source of funding, I have always maintained that the people of Alabama should have the final say on whether or not we are going down this path.

So that, my friends, is what this working Group will be charged to get – the facts!

Once they have done so — I will bring these facts to the 140 members of the Legislature and the people of Alabama. And we will then, once and for all, be in a position to determine whether or not this is a path we want to pursue.

Ultimately, my pledge would be for the people of Alabama to have the final say. But first, we must get the facts and understand what they mean.

My challenge to the Legislature is: give us some time to get the facts and then, together, we will give the people of Alabama the information they need to make the most informed decision possible.

As you know, when we have achieved great success in the past, it was only accomplished through a bipartisan effort and many months of advocacy to do what is in the best interest for the people of our state.

Finally, my promise.

Throughout my service as governor, I have pledged to level with you and be a governor who doesn’t shrinkfrom responsibility just because it is hard.

I promise you this – I’m going to do all I can to help lead our state to solve tough problems and realize our untapped potential. Serving as your governor has been the utmost honor and privilege of my life.

You see, I truly believe this is our moment… as we step confidently into our third century… to do the thingsthat need to be done, for both today and in the years to come.

And, ladies and gentlemen, I cannot do this without your help, your partnership and your support. Together,let’s make this moment count.

May God continue to bless you and the great state of Alabama.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

7 hours ago

Sessions makes closing pitch, knocks Tuberville with eight days until election

PIKE ROAD — Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Monday attacked his opponent for connections to a failed hedge fund and made the case that he was the right choice for Alabama Republicans in next week’s primary runoff.

Sessions’ remarks came during a campaign appearance at SweetCreek Farm Market in Pike Road, a suburb to the east of Montgomery. He and his opponent, former Auburn football coach Tommy Tuberville, compete at the ballot box on July 14 to be the nominee that will take on U.S. Sen. Doug Jones (D-AL) in November.

The details of Tuberville’s involvement in a hedge fund that ended in disaster were first printed in the New York Times over the weekend.

“Either he was greedy, incompetent, naive and lacked knowledge; or he actually deliberately participated in an activity that was criminal,” Sessions said Monday about the former coach’s alleged involvement.

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Tuberville campaign chairman Stan McDonald told the Times that Tuberville’s involvement in the hedge fund “was a big mistake, and he’s paid for it.”

McDonald says the coach was “as surprised as anyone” to learn that his partner in the venture, John David Stroud, was engaging in fraudulent behavior with the money in the fund.

Neither the regulating body in Alabama or Washington, D.C. that oversees hedge funds chose to charge Tuberville with a crime, though a former attorney for Stroud alleged Tuberville had knowledge of the dealings. The Times reported that the coach “was not picking stocks, or even a frequent presence in the office.” Coach Tuberville settled out of court after being sued by investors in the hedge fund and reportedly lost all of the money he invested in the venture.

Sessions also brought up a piece authored by an opinion writer at the Washington Examiner that detailed how Tuberville suspended a player for one game after the individual pleaded guilty a misdemeanor: contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

The incident in question involved Auburn wide receiver Clifton Robinson allegedly having sexual relations with a 15-year-old girl while he was a 20-year-old college student. The young woman involved in the encounter was visiting her sister on Auburn’s campus.

Robinson was initially charged with statutory rape but later pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor and was sentenced to one year of probation and 200 hours of community service.

Tuberville suspended Robinson indefinitely while the charges were being prosecuted as a rape but lessened it to a one-game suspension once prosecutors lowered the charge to a misdemeanor.

Sessions believes that the one-game suspension was insufficient.

“You simply cannot place winning football games ahead of responsibilities to young girls, you can’t put winning football games ahead of teaching important life lessons to young men,” Sessions commented.

“I think he made a mistake,” Sessions said of Tuberville.

At the event in Pike Road, the former senator from Alabama continued to express his frustration with Tuberville for choosing not to participate in a debate.

Sessions alleged that Tuberville “promised Bradley Byrne and I” that he would debate if he made the runoff.

Congressman Bradley Byrne (AL-01) took third place in the initial Republican primary for the U.S. Senate on March 3.

Yellowhammer News asked Seth Morrow, who served as Byrne’s campaign manager, about the alleged promise Sessions talked about on Monday.

Morrow told Yellowhammer that no formal agreement or promise was ever made between the three men to debate in a runoff scenario. Morrow added that he had checked with Byrne himself on Monday to make sure.

Tuberville’s campaign did not immediately return a request for comment about the debate assertion. The campaign has in the past maintained that their declining to debate is a matter of prudent strategy.

Sessions continues to say that Tuberville should “come out of hiding.”

With regards to why he was the right choice for voters, Sessions pointed to his conservative record and said he had “come out of the soil” of Alabama.

Sessions argued that he was a staunch supporter of the American First agenda since before Donald Trump began campaigning for president.

He mentioned that two conservative challengers have recently beaten Trump-endorsed candidates, because in his view, those challengers were more effective than their opponents at communicating their support of the president’s agenda. Sessions believes he will be the next member of that group.

Sessions was asked if it was disappointing to be trailing Tuberville in the polls to try and represent the seat he held for 20 years.

“The voters will decide,” he responded. “The polls have often been in error.”

Henry Thornton is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can contact him by email: henry@yellowhammernews.com or on Twitter @HenryThornton95

10 hours ago

Doug Jones to host Dr. Anthony Fauci for Tuesday press conference

U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) has a big-name special guest for his next weekly live-streamed press conference regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jones on Monday announced that National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Director Dr. Anthony Fauci will join him for the remote press conference, to be held Tuesday, July 7, at 11:15 a.m. CT.

Fauci rose to national attention as a leader in the White House’s response to the coronavirus outbreak this spring.

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Jones’ press conerence can be viewed live on his office’s Facebook page.

Fauci’s public appearances have waned recently compared to earlier in the pandemic.

Recent guests featured in Jones’ press conferences include Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed, Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin and Alabama State Health Officer Dr. Scott Harris.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

10 hours ago

Dale Jackson: Why won’t the Trump candidate act like Trump?

Are we heading toward a Roy Moore 2.0 (even though he ran like 10 times)?

The media and their Democrats sure hope so. They want Tommy Tuberville as the nominee. They want a blank slate that they can paint however they desire.

Look at the stories about Tuberville’s past that are being floated by national media outlets in the last two weeks of the election.

Keep in mind that this is the GOP oppo research, not Democrats with their deep-pocketed allies and their slim hopes to hang on to a blue seat in a red state.

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U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) knows that he needs people to vote against the GOP candidate and not for him. This is just a math question at this point.

Can Jones and his allies in the media (national and local) damage his opponent and make people skip the race?

Doubtful, but I bet there are zero surprises in former Senator Jeff Sessions’ (R-AL) record. It’s the main reason so many Republicans are mad at him. They know all about his recusal as U.S. Attorney General and how mad that made President Donald Trump.

Trump wants Tuberville, and Trump may get his way.

But, if Tommy Tuberville is not the Republican nominee after next Tuesday, it will not be the fault of Jeff Sessions, Donald Trump, Clifton Robinson, John David Stroud, the Washington Examiner or the New York Times.

It will be his own fault.

The former football coach has run a campaign for the attention of President Donald Trump while running the least Donald Trump campaign of all time.

The premise that Trump would sit on a lead and run out the clock is absurd, but Tuberville has said that is what he is doing.

Trump wants 10 debates with his opponent, but Tuberville won’t do one.

People say Trump is a counter-puncher, but that is a lie. Trump is an aggressive punch-thrower and is constantly looking to knock his foes out of the fight.

Whether they are worthy of the fight or not, Trump swings away.

Tuberville does not.

When the Washington Examiner brought to the surface a story that has been bubbling on social media and in text messages about a more than 20-year-old allegation that then-coach Tuberville was soft on a player charged with statutory rape, his campaign barely responded.

The most that was mustered in response was from Tuberville campaign chairman Stan McDonald during a weekly appearance on WVNN’s “The Dale Jackson Show,” who said, “It is something that originates from people who are trying to bring Tommy Tuberville down. So, that is not something we’re going to participate in.”

This was a different time in America, obviously, which is why it will get new legs in a 2020 general election.

Is this politics? Yes. Last-minute campaign noise? Obviously. A reason to swallow the whistle? Nope.

When the New York Times reported on a shady hedge fund that Tuberville was involved in, did his campaign respond?

Nope.

There are allegations that Tuberville’s business partner was involved in a massive fraud that saw him sentenced to 10 years in prison, and the Tuberville response was one of weakness.

McDonald and pro-Tuberville Grit PAC employee Brad Presnall both begged off the question by claiming that the coach was just a small-time football coach who didn’t know any better. The big city folks conned him, too.

Tuberville said he was just a swindled pawn, a victim, and he was manipulated.

“They sued me because I invested in it, and he used my name to get other people to put money in,” he stated.

Could you ever see that from Donald Trump? I can’t.

The facts also paint a different story, but not a better one:

But a review of public court records shows that he had a broader role. While he was not picking stocks, or even a frequent presence in the office, Mr. Tuberville made introductions to potential investors, had business cards identifying himself as managing partner, and leased a BMW and got his health insurance through the company. Its offices in Auburn were filled with his coaching memorabilia. In 2010, he traveled to New York with Mr. Stroud to meet potential brokers for the fund, and was kept in the loop on decisions about hiring, according to email traffic.

But what would Trump do here?

Why would the Trumpian candidate sit back and let this all go on around him without firing off a few tweets taking on the New York Times or the fake news media?

Why wouldn’t Tuberville seek out the cameras, which he could summon at any time, to come take his testimony about what really happened?

None of this dooms Tuberville on July 14. Everyone knows he has a lead.

And we all know the media and their Democrats can’t wait to attack Tuberville on these issues, but the idea that Alabama voters will go into a polling place to vote for President Donald Trump in November while also pulling the lever for soon-to-be-former U.S. Senator Doug Jones is laughable.

The real question in all of this is where is Tommy Tuberville, and why isn’t he punching back? Trump supporters want a fighter and an outsider. His huge early lead was indicative of the outsider part, but the fighter part never materialized.

If that is who Tommy Tuberville is, then he needs to get out there and prove it.

Right now he is taking body blows. Maybe he can withstand them, but that is harder to do while sitting on a lead and hoping he can run out the clock.

Listen:

Dale Jackson is a contributing writer to Yellowhammer News and hosts a talk show from 7-11 AM weekdays on WVNN.

 

11 hours ago

Carl, Coleman lead pre-runoff fundraising in Alabama’s GOP congressional races

The latest fundraising reports have been filed in the respective Republican primary runoffs for the U.S. House of Representatives in Alabama’s First Congressional District and Second Congressional District.

Covering April 1 to June 24, the pre-runoff reports were due by Thursday, July 2 — 12 days ahead of the July 14 election.

Reports filed with the FEC show that Mobile County Commissioner Jerry Carl, running in AL-01, raised $215,740, spent $183,035 and finished the period with $238,925 cash-on-hand.

Meanwhile, his opponent former State Senator Bill Hightower (R-Mobile) reported raising $174,057, spending $192,156 and ending the period with $194,924 on hand.

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The campaigns have also filed 48-hour notice reports in the subsequent days. These mandatory reports only include donations of $1,000 or more and thus do not include all money raised in a 48-hour window.

Carl reported raising $9,500 from June 25 through July 3, while Hightower reported raising $30,950 during the same timeframe.

In AL-02, Wiregrass businessman Jeff Coleman led in fundraising for the pre-runoff report period.

From April 1 to June 24, Coleman raised $328,502, spent $257,761 and finished the period with $132,054.

In comparison, his opponent former State Rep. Barry Moore (R-Enterprise) brought in $92,343, spent $126,784 and concluded the period with $92,583 on hand.

Moore has not filed any 48-hour notice reports for June 25 through July 3. Coleman reported raising $12,500 during this period.

While in different races, fundraising leaders Carl and Coleman share the same fundraiser: EBW Development.

Hightower and Moore are both backed by Washington, D.C.-based Club for Growth, which has spent large sums for both candidates during the runoff.

RELATED: Tuberville leads Sessions in final fundraising report before July 14 runoff

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

12 hours ago

Tuberville leads Sessions in final fundraising report before July 14 runoff

The latest fundraising reports have been filed in Alabama’s Republican primary runoff for the U.S. Senate.

Covering April 1 to June 24, the pre-runoff reports were due by Thursday, July 2 — 12 days ahead of the July 14 election.

Respective reports filed with the FEC show that former Auburn University head football coach Tommy Tuberville raised $652,389, spent $663,004 and finished the period with $448,204 cash-on-hand.

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Meanwhile, former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reported raising $439,734, spending $688,639 and ending the period with $500,331 on hand.

The two campaigns have also filed 48-hour notice reports in the subsequent days. These mandatory reports only include donations of $1,000 or more and thus do not include all money raised in a 48-hour window.

Tuberville reported raising $195,300 from June 25 through July 3, while Sessions reported raising $36,800 during the same timeframe.

The winner of the GOP runoff will go on to face U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) in November.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn