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Planned Parenthood ignores crime in singular pursuit of death culture


Listen to the 10 min audio

Read the transcript:

ANOTHER SUPREME COURT DECISION — ON ABORTION

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, last Friday, we talked about the Supreme Court decision involving cake baker, Jack Phillips. Today, I want to go over a second opinion that was released the same day. It was a five-page unsigned opinion that did not issue a judgement as to the merits of the dispute but approved the administration’s request to vacate a ruling under a legal rule called “Munsingwear Vacatur.”

The case was Azar vs. Garza. It was occasioned back in October of 2017. Our listeners might remember that was when an undocumented teen in federal custody, known in court papers only as Jane Doe, learned she was pregnant and asked authorities to terminate her pregnancy. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services refused, claiming it had no obligation to facilitate abortions for minors in their care.

DR. REEDER: Basically, what they have said is that the government was within its bounds to apply its precedent that they were not under obligation to provide such services in terms of abortion and, therefore, they supported the administration’s use of the Munsingwear ruling. No opinions are issued from the Supreme Court on this, simply that the government should not have been ignored.

Another thing that they didn’t do was take up the government’s request that the ACLU lawyers be sanctioned. For me, that was troubling.

ROGUE LAWYERS AND PLANNED PARENTHOOD HAVE SINGULAR MISSION AND WILL NOT STOP

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Now, when you’re referring to the ACLU lawyers, they’re the ones that advocated for the abortion?

DR. REEDER: Well, they not only advocated for the abortion; it became abundantly clear — and they kind of did a wink and a nod — that they not only ignored administrative oversight from the government in terms of its applications and decisions, but they found a way to circumvent it and they did so by procuring the abortion — and then, once it’s procured, you can’t unabort a child — and they did so under false premises.

There’s two reasons that I think they need to be sanctioned. First, what they did was unethical. Secondly, what they did was anarchy. It is abundantly clear that there are a number of organizations that are absolutely focused and bent unerringly to make our culture a culture of death, particularly, for the children in the womb who are unwanted consequences of our activity.

I am not taking up the issue of rape and incest, which is less than 1 percent of the rationale for abortions. This other 99-plus percent is the objective of the ACLU. They will violate legal ethics willingly, knowingly, intentionally at the whim of their desires because of the intentionality of their desires to promote the culture of death and the assault upon the unborn in the womb. And, by the way, they’re not the only ones: Planned Parenthood has manifested its singular focus of a search and destroy of such children in the womb.

CRIME COVERED UP BY PLANNED PARENTHOOD

TOM LAMPRECHT:  And to that end, let me bring up two stories — one out of The Daily Wire and the other out of Live Action News. They’re reporting that former Planned Parenthood employees were told not to report suspected sexual abuse of pregnant minors and adults who went to clinics to get abortions.

And this isn’t the first time Planned Parenthood has been accused of covering up assault and rape. The Pinal County Sheriff’s Office in Arizona claimed in 2014 that an abortion mill counselor intentionally withheld information about alleged rape from law enforcement personnel months before others came forward to stop a Poston Butte High School student from attacking more teenagers.

They also reported that a man who impregnated his daughter took her to Planned Parenthood more than once to kill the babies and the abortion mill failed to report the repeated rape. “They should have been suspicious; they should have asked questions,” says Live Action News, “but killing the growing child is the organization’s bottom line.

DR. REEDER: That’s its bottom line. Here was a case of a girl that came and got an abortion because of the incestuous activity of her father and they would not report it, lest it hinder the search and destroy of the child. And, therefore, the child then is sent back into a home with a father with that behavior and guess what? It was repeated and so now she’s back again with another child but, more than that, she is back with all of the scars, emotionally and spiritually, that come from being in a home like that.

To report it may have involved Planned Parenthood in activity that may have either hindered or would have given pause to their desire to perform the abortion. These counselors that don’t report it don’t report it because they have been given orders not to report it. This is a policy matter from the top down.

COUNSELING IS CRUCIAL

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, the age in which we live, everything wants to be secularized and it’s just the physical. When you have a lady like this, whose father is forcing himself upon her and she’s the victim of an incestuous relationship, how does the spiritual dovetail with this physical aberration?

DR. REEDER: Well, that’s another whole issue that you have surfaced and that is why our government should not be in the position of promoting any one religion but protecting the free exercise of religion. They ought not to ignore the benefits of spiritual counseling and the religious enterprise in the lives of someone. This strikes not at just your body; this strikes at your very soul.

“Legally, we’re going to step in and deal with your father, but can we encourage you to seek counseling? You may want to go to secular counseling or you may want to go to spiritual counseling, but you need to go to some kind of counseling and may we strongly encourage you to do that?”

PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL EFFECTS

I think the government ought to engage in that recommendation without selecting who they are to go to. Instead of a teenager having to cope with the reality of what her father has done — that’s going to affect the way she views men, that’s going to affect the way she views fatherhood, that’s going to affect the way she would view marriage — that is soul-shaking and that comes back to our world and life view.

We don’t have this platonic view of life that there’s the physical and the spiritual and they’re separated as the lower story of life, the physical, and the upper story, the spiritual. No, we have historically a Biblical world and life view in our culture that says the spiritual and the physical are interdependent — two threads woven into one cloth — and when things happen to you physically, they have a spiritual consequence and, when things are happening to you spiritually, they have a physical consequence.

In my whole life, what I did physically was drastically changed when I was born again, and I came to Christ as Lord and Savior. That affected all kinds of the ways that I governed my appetites, I governed relationships, friendships, activities, hobbies, everything else that engaged the physical. That’s why the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. It shows up in the physical.

We ought to at least continue to acknowledge what, historically, we have always acknowledged: that you don’t have the physical over here and the spiritual over here. We do not believe there’s a sacred-secular dichotomy. What we believe is that all of life is sacred and all of life is affected. When you are criminally assaulted, certainly in the area of a sexual assault, there is a spiritual impact.

TO THE SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT, SEEK GOD IN HIS CHURCH

May I just finish our program, Tom, by speaking to those who have been victims of such sexual assaults? And I think this #metoo movement is a recognition that you cannot develop a culture in the public square in which there is degradation of language, of the sacredness of sex, of unwanted physical and aggressive relationships against people. We have got to understand that language matters, words matter, ideas matter. We need to see people with the dignity of being made in the image of God and, therefore, treat people with respect and that means you don’t see people as sexual objects.

And if you have been the victim of that kind of assault, I encourage you now to search out a Bible-believing church where there is a pastor who is known for his commitment to the Word of God, who is known for being above reproach in his life, and that the church, while not perfect, is intentionally reaching out to people so that they can know Christ and make Him known and have lives that are affected by the forgiveness and life-changing power of the Gospel.

And, if there’s any way I can help you find such a church, please don’t hesitate to let us know. We are available with that glorious truth that there’s a savior Who loves you, Who is there to uphold you, Who will never leave you nor forsake you, and Who not only grants to us the joy of forgiveness, but the power to forgive others and the power to be more than conquerors, no matter what a fallen world brings against us.

Dr. Harry L. Reeder III is the Senior Pastor of Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham.

This podcast was transcribed by Jessica Havin, editorial assistant for Yellowhammer News, who has transcribed some of the top podcasts in the country and whose work has been featured in a New York Times Bestseller.

54 mins ago

A.G. Gaston Boys and Girls Club breaks ground on $7.2 million clubhouse at Birmingham CrossPlex

A.G. Gaston Boys & Girls Club is building a $7.2 million Walter Howlett Jr. Clubhouse at Birmingham CrossPlex, but if history is any indication, it’s also building future leaders.
Leaders like Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin, who is a self-proclaimed “club kid” having grown up in Boys & Girls Clubs.

“I can personally speak to the power of the Boys & Girls Club,” Woodfin said. “I spent some formative years here as a club kid.”

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Woodfin said it was on the sports practice fields in downtown Birmingham where he learned the value of teamwork.

“The greatest lesson I learned from the club … is the importance of teamwork in this city,” he said. “I learned that no matter how great the individual players were as part of the club or on the team, it’s the unity that ensures victory.”

Former U.S. Secretary of State and Birmingham native Condoleezza Rice has made mentoring and youth programs like Boys & Girls Club a pet project nationally. She praised the possibilities the new clubhouse in Birmingham holds.

“This great, new clubhouse for the A.G. Gaston Boys & Girls Club is just going to be full of possibilities,” she said. “It’s not just programs that they deliver on. They deliver on caring and compassion for our young people.”

Rice co-chaired the campaign to build a new clubhouse for the A.G. Gaston Boys & Girls Club along with Altec CEO Lee Styslinger III and Regions Financial Corp.Chairman Grayson Hall.

She said those who contributed to the new clubhouse initiative have demonstrated they make children a priority.

“This is about the possibilities when a community comes together,” Rice said. “It’s absolutely the case that when the corporate community and private citizens like the McWanes and people from across the city come together and say, ‘We’re going to do something special for our kids,’ something magnificent happens.”

Frank Adams, CEO of A.G. Gaston Boys & Girls Club, said the new facility will include a new gym, a music room, a game room, a new café able to serve hot meals and STREAM (science, technology, reading, engineering, art and math) labs. The two-story facility will have a floor dedicated to teens and will be able to serve twice as many children as the Kirkwood R. Balton facility it is replacing.

Adams said the clubhouse will be a great addition to the CrossPlex campus.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to help revitalize this area while serving our kids at a higher level,” he said.

Walter Howlett Jr. was a prominent member of the business community in Birmingham and served as the chairman of the board at A.G. Gaston Boys & Girls Club for more than 20 years. Adams said it’s a worthy tribute to name the new facility after him.

The CrossPlex campus and the new facility are in Birmingham City Councilman Steven Hoyt’s district. He said the new clubhouse will be a welcomed addition.

“Today is very much about an orchestrated optimism and the future of our young people,” he said. “This new club is a symbol of hope.”

Rice said that hope has been realized again and again through Boys & Girls Clubs.

“The Boys & Girls Clubs talk about building great futures,” she said. “Well, you can only get a great future if you have a great start and that is what this is really all about.

“The best in us believes that every life is worthy, and every life is worthy of greatness,” she added.

Who knows, maybe the next mayor or the next secretary of state will come from there.

“I believe in the A.G. Gaston Boys & Girls Club because I know it’s power,” Woodfin said. “It’s a training ground to guide our young people in the right direction. It’s where they will make lasting friendships, make community connections and acquire life lessons that will serve them well when they become the next leaders of our city.”

(Courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter)

3 hours ago

Exceptional Foundation carolers bring holiday spirit to Alabama businesses

What the Exceptional Foundation carolers may lack in perfect pitch and rhythm they more than make up for with enthusiasm and sheer joy.

The result is exactly what is intended: delivering the Christmas spirit to businesses around Birmingham.

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That delivery is clear by the smiles produced among the audiences.

This is the fifth year the Exceptional Foundation carolers have visited corporations to thank them for their support. CEO Tricia Kirk said the number of performances has grown from less than a handful of businesses in the first season to five or six a day this year.

(Courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter)

5 hours ago

Alabama Power works to save threatened snails on Coosa River

While many property owners used this fall’s Coosa River drawdown to make repairs to boathouses, piers and other structures along the water’s edge, Alabama Power biologists were on another mission.

APC Environmental Affairs employees worked with members of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR) to protect rare snails on Lay and Mitchell lakes.

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The first step involved surveying threatened species — literally by counting the number of snails in a given area.

Two species of freshwater aquatic snails listed under the Endangered Species Act, the rough hornsnail and Tulotoma snail, call the Coosa River home. Both are native to Alabama and are found nowhere else in the world.

“We do a manual count, which gives you an estimate of the number of that species within a certain area,” said Jason Carlee, APC Environmental Affairs supervisor. “You can then multiply that number by the area of the lake bottom affected by the drawdown to estimate how much of the population is affected.”

The work wasn’t limited to surveying. The biologists were also charged with saving snails affected by the drawdown. Snails that might have had trouble navigating to the lower lake levels were picked up along the riverbank and returned to the water.

“The primary objectives at Lay Lake and Lake Mitchell were surveying known populations of Tulotoma and rough hornsnail, searching for new populations of the species and relocating species to suitable habitat in deeper water,” said Chad Fitch, a biologist with Alabama Power.

The snails live anywhere from one to 30 feet below the shoreline but prefer to live just below the water’s edge, according to Carlee.

“The lowering of the water forces the snails to follow the water and, as they move, they can get trapped by vegetation or stuck behind a log or rock,” Carlee said. “Our priority is to identify new populations and to salvage as many snails as we can.”

The teams focused on areas with known populations and salvaged snails when the water was at its lowest level to make the most significant positive impact. A previous survey and salvage effort was conducted during the 2013 drawdown, and additional snail surveys were done in 2009 and 2012.

“Part of our week was spent searching for new populations of rough hornsnails, and we found them,” said Fitch. “Before this week, the species was only known to occur in four different locations on Mitchell Reservoir, but we found them in three other creeks this week as well as along the shorelines in the main channel.”

Several other steps have been taken to protect the snails. For example, the timing and frequency of the fall drawdowns have been adjusted to benefit the species.

“Historically for Lay and Mitchell, there were drawdowns every year. Then they went to every other year. Since the discovery of rough hornsnails at Lake Mitchell and at Yellowleaf Creek on Lay Reservoir, drawdowns are conducted every five years to decrease impacts to the snails,” Fitch said.

Tracks left by the snails leading from the riverbank to the water indicate that the species can adjust to water level fluctuations. Lake levels are now lowered very slowly over a three-day period, to give snails more time to follow the dropping water.

Alabama Power works with USFWS and ADCNR to find ways to protect and improve habitat conditions for snails and other aquatic species as part of its license to operate dams issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. All the hard work is paying off. The Tulotoma snail was downlisted from endangered to threatened in 2011 as populations below Coosa River dams increased. It was the first time a freshwater species of mollusks, which includes clams, mussels and slugs, was downlisted. New populations of rough hornsnail provide hope for its recovery.

Results from this year’s snail survey will help regulators determine the impact of water level fluctuations on species like these snails and help provide guidance concerning future drawdowns.

This story originally appeared in Shorelines magazine.

(Courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter)

Alexander Shunnarah gives back to the community with the first annual ‘Shunnarah Seasons of Giving’ initiative

Most people know Alexander Shunnarah for his infamous “Call me Alabama” slogan and the massive trail of billboards commonly spotted by travelers along I-65. However, what many aren’t aware of is Shunnarrah’s heart for giving back to the city he calls home.

To show his love and appreciation for Birmingham, the Alabama lawyer just launched the first ever “Shunnarah’s Seasons of Giving” initiative and is surprising locals in the community with various acts of service throughout the month of December.

Shunnurah described this initiative as a, “…small part in giving back to the community and paying it forward.”

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To begin the month-long program, Shunnarrah stopped by Etheridge Brother and Sister Barber and Beauty Shop in downtown Birmingham last week where he gave locals an opportunity to receive a complimentary haircut.

“It’s been a great initial kickoff in the seasons of giving,” Shunarrah said.

In addition to these pop-up visits, Shunnarah’s law firm is partnering with The Shoe Clinic LLC for the clinic’s third annual ‘Saving One Sole at a Time” Sneaker, Sock and Coat Drive. The drive will take place at The Shoe Clinic LLC on Saturday, December 15th from 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Donations are accepted now through December 15th. Both organizations hope to collect 500 sneakers and coats, and 1000 pairs of socks by December 15th.

To donate to the sneaker, sock and coat drive, visit one of the two drop-off locations listed here:

The Shoe Clinic
1801 11th Ave S. Birmingham, AL,

Alexander Shunnarah Law Firm
2900 1st Ave. S. Birmingham, AL.

To see where Alexander Shunurrah visits for the next “Shunnarah’s Seasons of Giving” pop-up, visit his Instagram page at @alexander_shunnarah.

7 hours ago

Artur Davis: What the next Montgomery mayor needs

The coming mayoral race in Montgomery matters whether you live in city limits, or whether it is simply important to you or your business that Alabama’s capital thrives. The conversation on the ground is that the outcome could be the next historic milestone for the city that launched civil rights.

Former U.S. Magistrate Judge Vanzetta McPherson caused a stir with a recent Montgomery Advertiser column that argues “it is time for the occupant of the mayor’s office to reflect the predominant (African-American) citizenry.” She further suggests that there is a burden on black voters and leader to “filter black candidates early,” so that the ranks be purged of those who by some test fail, in her words, to “serve the best interests of the African-American community.”

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I know the judge’s sentiments are well-intentioned but as one of the seven or eight folks who will be running for Mayor, as the only contender who has officially registered a campaign committee, I view this election through a different lens. Montgomery has challenges at every turn. The test is not the mayor’s color or gender but whether the city’s next leader is visionary and substantial enough to unlock those opportunities disguised as challenges.

Mayor is not an entry-level job, as the judge correctly observed. The mayor-to-be will have to learn and master the details of making urban policy work for ordinary people. The job demands persistence and a clear eye about the questions that threaten Montgomery’s future.

Can our schools be rescued? For a while now, the leadership of our school system has resembled its population demographically: that by itself has meant nothing to the children in our eleven failing schools, or the 37 percent of children who graduate high school without core reading and math skills. The next mayor must join forces with the new school board to extricate the schools from the state takeover, a mismanaged event that creates the kind of uncertain chain of command that makes it impossible to attract a national caliber superintendent. The next mayor will have to sell the neighborhoods whose children are in magnets or private schools on the imperative of financing traditional schools adequately. He or she will also need to overcome forces who resist innovative reforms or stricter accountability.

Can we make a real dent in Montgomery’s poverty problem? West and North Montgomery are statistically identical to the chronically poor Black Belt. The southern boulevard is one long patch of neglect and collapsed businesses. Too many of our working people are still poor and trapped in dead-end jobs. For decades, the struggling parts of our city have had representation that “looks like them.” That fact has not yet stopped the decline.

Can we roll back crime and the root causes of crime? An overwhelming majority of criminal defendants are drop-outs. Our city has yet to fashion a comprehensive plan to identify and engage students who have encounters with the law or are chronic disciplinary problems. At the same time, if a city as complex as New York can reduce its rates of gun violence and murder, the next mayor of Montgomery should be expected to devise an anti-crime plan more robust than empathy and short-term anger management courses.

I could go on. We have reached new heights in corporate investment in the city but more of that newly infused wealth must be targeted toward creating jobs that pay high wages. Promoting minority investment is an urgent, consistently unmet need that takes more than conferences at the Renaissance to solve. Our municipal government structure has not been reorganized since the time when smartphones had not been invented and the internet in this city was limited to government offices.

The record of the mayor who is leaving, Todd Strange, will loom over this election. I ran against him but will grant him this: in an era when national politics has degenerated into all or nothing partisanship and what the experts call tribalism, Mayor Strange has kept the volume temperate and moderate in Montgomery. The next mayor should emulate that decency. He or she must match it with a boldness and a capacity to challenge old assumptions and challenge 21st Century problems.

I do agree that this city is on the edge of making history. But the test for candidates is not how well we represent one community or satisfy that community’s insiders and gatekeepers. It is whether any of us has what it takes to make Montgomery a trendsetter in repairing failing schools and blighted neighborhoods and in forging a more prosperous, more equitable future.

If you live in Montgomery, vote for the guy or lady you think just might know how to get us there.

Artur Davis is a former four-term congressman from Montgomery running for mayor.