Gender chaos leads to societal chaos


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WHY HAS PERSONAL IDENTITY BECOME SUCH A BIG PROBLEM IN SOCIETY?

TOM LAMPRECHT:  Harry, today, I’d like to take you to an in-depth article written by a friend of yours, Dr. Peter Jones. It deals with personal identity. He writes, “If personal identity becomes one of the areas of human rights to be defended with moral passion, then there can be no universal moral standards.” What does he mean by that?

HARRY REEDER: Peter has appropriately addressed this from Romans 1:18 through the end of the chapter, the three-fold death spiral of a culture that denies God and the worship of God and institutes the worship of the creature and the worship of the creation.

In other words, instead of what he calls “two-ism” — the majestic God and then, secondly, His creation — there is now the creature made in the image of God who is to oversee God’s creation that God made for him — the creation is the home of humanity made in the image of God and humanity is called to be a good steward of that home and to fill it for His glory and to use it for His glory — man says, “There is no Creator. Everything exists out of a materialistic explanation,” thus atheistic evolution. Therefore, man is God and we are not here in the image of God, but we are God.
DENYING GOD AS CREATOR LEADS THE CREATURE ASTRAY

And he makes the point, whenever that happens, there is a downward spiral. Today, it is the universally acclaimed “right” of personal identity: “I am who I say I am.” You now have actually taught, in academic circles with academic respectability, statements such as this: When you are born, it is valid to put on the birth certificate your “biological sex” male or female, but it is not valid to put gender because gender is a matter of social construct.

There is a direct denial that God says, “No, there is male; there is female.” Now, do we want socially attached directives to define gender? No, but we do want the Word of God that reveals to us that we are made in the image of God and the image of God requires male and female. And there is something distinctive about male and female and distinctive about how you live out your masculinity and your femininity in life and the three spheres of life: the civil arena of life, the sacred arena of life of the church, and the foundational arena of life which is marriage and family. There is a denial of that and says yes, there is a biological sex, but gender is a social construct and it awaits the person’s identification of their gender. That is, you personally identify.

ACADEMIA IS SPREADING POST-MODERN THEORIES ON IDENTITY

It was very interesting, if you’ll remember, the young lady, the president of an African-American organization in the state of Washington that claimed that she was African-American but we found that was cosmetic and the reality is she is not. And her family spoke up and then the outcry from the academic circles, “Well, yes, she is African-American if she identifies as African-American.” That now leads to men who say, “I identify as a female,” winning 100-yard dashes with male testosterone outgunning the hormones of the females in the race — “Oh, well, biologically, he may be a he, but he identifies as a she” — and so you now have chaos in sports and chaos in the military and chaos everywhere in the trans ideology, which is based upon personal identity.

Society was based upon premodernity, which is God has revealed truth in creation and in Scripture and you now function based upon what God has revealed — that is, reason is used on the foundation of revelation.

Well, now we have moved to modernity, which says no, revelation is mythological and man’s reason is the foundation of life and that’s modernity. It was captured most clearly by Descartes, who said, “I think; therefore, I am.” Up until then, it was “I am; God has revealed I am made in the image of God. Being made in the image of God, I can communicate and think.”

Therefore, up until Descartes, academia was built upon “I am; therefore, I can think. I am made in the image of God; therefore, I can think. I am a rational creature. I’m not an animal. There’s something different about humanity made in the image of God, male and female.”

Now we move to the Descartes declaration embraced by academics, which is “I think; therefore, I am.” Well, the fallibility of our thinking has attacked the veracity of our existence. Thus, now modernity has moved to post-modernity so we’ve moved from “I am; therefore, I think,” to “I think; therefore, I am,” now we have moved to “Whatever I think I am is what I am.”

HOWEVER, CHAOS OF IDENTITY LEADS TO CHAOS OF SOCIETY

And that, of course, leads to utter chaos as we’re seeing, but man’s rebellion and idolatry of self says, “I will not reason from God’s revelation. My reason is going to be supreme and, if my reason is supreme, then I am sovereign and there is no God who made me what I am. I am what I think I am and whatever I think I am, I must be treated that way in society. So, if I say I’m an African-American but I’m Caucasian, it doesn’t matter. You have to treat me that way because that’s what I think I am.”

And that’s where the trans ideology has extended into the gender confusion arena and so, instead of seeing gender confusion as an adolescent issue, it has now become a “cause celeb” whereby, “These are not people confused, but these are people telling you who they really are inside of themselves.” And you go back and say, “Well, if you go inside of them and we take the DNA out, guess what? They’re male. They’re a female. That’s who they are. You dig them up after they die, 500 years, do a bone test, they’re going to say, ‘That was a man. That was a woman.’”

THE GOOD NEWS IS OUR IDENTITY IN GOD IS UNCHANGEABLE

My identity is not derived from who I say I am, and what I do and what the culture affirms. I am what I am, first of all, because God made me in His image and, secondly, I am what I am by the grace of God. Tom, we now have a generation of children who have no meaning except what they say is their meaning and what the world affirms as their meaning instead of an intrinsic dignity.

Tom, I just finished a couple of hours last night working on a chapter in my commentary that I’m doing on the Book of James, which says to us this glorious truth: How can you say you love God and don’t love your brother? If you can’t love your brother, who is made in the image of God, how can you say that you love God? And notice our relationships with each other are built on the relationship and dignity of who God is and how God made the people around me. I can’t say I love Him and then have people around me who are made in the image of God and not properly love them.

And what is that declaring? That’s declaring, everybody you meet — I don’t care if they’re Black, white, rich, poor, North American, South American — I don’t care who they are or where they are in terms of their intrinsic worth. Everybody has intrinsic worth, not assigned to themselves by themselves or assigned to themselves by the culture, but they have an intrinsic worth assigned to them by God. It is not an assigned worth and dignity, but it is an intrinsic worth and dignity. God made them in His image; male and female He made in His image; old and young; rich and poor; in the womb, outside of the womb — there is the dignity of humanity.

God made you in His image and, if you come to Jesus, you can be conformed to the image of Christ and you can say with men who are changed like the apostle Paul, who was Saul of Tarsus and a religious terrorist until the grace of God met Him and then he says this: “I am what I am, not only because of how God made me, but what God is doing in me. I am what I am by the grace of God in Christ.”

Dr. Harry L. Reeder III is the Senior Pastor of Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham.

This podcast was transcribed by Jessica Havin, editorial assistant for Yellowhammer News, who has transcribed some of the top podcasts in the country and whose work has been featured in a New York Times Bestseller.

59 mins ago

ADCNR officers help spread Christmas cheer at Academy Sports

Imagine elves filling baskets with goodies to load on Santa’s sleigh and you get a snapshot of what it looked like last week when Academy Sports + Outdoors provided Christmas cheer for numerous youngsters who needed that encouragement the most.

At Academy stores across Alabama, youngsters were chosen to go on shopping sprees with a budget of $150 each, assisted by first responders from the local area. In two locations, Huntsville and Foley, Alabama Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR) enforcement officers assisted the kids in choosing the items that were loaded into the shopping carts.

Into the baskets went bows and arrows, footballs, basketballs, soccer balls, clothing, athletic shoes, candy canes and more. The youngsters proved more than adept at keeping track of just how far that gift card would go, counting down until the funding was exhausted.

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“Academy Sports + Outdoors is excited to partner with first responders across the state of Alabama to help 150 children enjoy more sports and outdoor fun this holiday season,” said Rick Burleson, Academy’s Regional Marketing Specialist. “As the shopping destination with the most fun gifts and gear, we look forward to making the holidays merry for our local communities across Alabama.”

Chris Blankenship, ADCNR’s Commissioner, said the shopping events presented a special opportunity for outreach to the younger generation.

“I appreciate Academy Sports + Outdoors for sponsoring this program,” Commissioner Blankenship said. “Opportunities like this where enforcement officers can interact positively with citizens, especially youth, are so valuable for building trust on both sides. Our Conservation Enforcement Officers participate in many programs to promote hunting and fishing for youth. This is just another example of the good people we have in the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

“In the photos, you can really see the joy in the faces of the kids, the officers and the employees of Academy Sports + Outdoors. The giving spirit of Academy, our officers and the community is evident in the outpouring of support for this program. With this scene replicated at hundreds of Academy stores all over the country, good relations with law enforcement are being built nationwide and will pay dividends for many years to come. My desire to work in conservation came from encounters such as this with Marine Resources conservation officers when I was a kid. You cannot underestimate what effects the little things like this will have on a person and a community.”

At the Foley event, Conservation Enforcement Officers from the Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries (WFF) Division and the Marine Resources Division aided 10 youngsters from the afterschool program at the John McClure Snook Family YMCA in Foley.

Melissa McGhee, associate branch director of the Foley YMCA, said the youngsters ranged in age from 5 to 13.

“All the kids we chose are highly scholarshipped kids,” McGhee said. “They just don’t have a lot. For three of them, this is their Christmas. This was such an honor to be picked for this. When I talked to some of the parents, they just started crying because this is what their kids are doing for Christmas.”

Jason Ford, Academy Store Director in Foley, said providing a venue for officers and youngsters to interact in a positive way during the holiday season was well worth the effort from Academy and the associates who also assisted during the shopping sprees.

“We love that we can reach out to people in our community who are less fortunate,” Ford said. “But it also strengthens the bonds between our first responders and our community. Right now, we can use that unity more than ever. To be able to impact the community in such a positive way really goes a long way in warming my heart, and hopefully seeing the kids gets some good Christmas presents and develop some goodwill with our law enforcement.”

WFF Conservation Officer Steve Schrader wore a perpetual smile while he helped a young lady fill her basket with gifts from shoes to candy cane-shaped containers filled with M&Ms.

“This has been great,” Schrader said. “My shopper has been very generous and has bought more for her family than herself. I hope she now sees us (enforcement officers) more friendly than the other side of the fence. They can see us as real people, too. I think it went really well.”

At the event in Huntsville, Beth Morring with the Boys and Girls Clubs of North Alabama echoed the need for the sponsored kids to find out more about the ADCNR enforcement officers and what those officers actually do.

“Before they started shopping, we asked the Conservation guys to explain what they do every day,” Morring said. “The officers told them how they protected the wildlife and help those who fish and hunt and enjoy the outdoors. It was neat because our kids probably never knew these men and women existed. It was a learning experience just to meet these officers, which was great.”

Morring said 10 kids from the Seminole Boys and Girls Clubs in Huntsville were chosen for the event.

“These were the kids who needed it the most,” she said. “With $150 to shop, we did kind of steer them during their shopping, as did the officers. We started with shoes first and then went to get some essential clothing. They were able to get a goodie or two as well. It was a great time, and everybody wanted new shoes. These kids were predominantly from the public housing area where the club is located, and they were thrilled to get some new, shiny tennis shoes. In fact, some of them wore them out of the store that day, which was fabulous.”

Morring said the event was much more than just a shopping spree for the kids.

“To watch them interact with the officers and for our children to see men and women who serve and protect us, that they are good people,” she said. “Many of our children don’t have as positive an exposure with first responders sometimes. For them to be able to meet these first responders who can talk to them and realize these are dads and moms and husbands and wives – just regular people even though they might be in a uniform. So that positive interaction was so important. That was really impactful for our children.”

Morring said it was great to see the officers meet the kids on the same level.

“I loved watching these big grown-ups with these little children and them kneeling down on the floor to help them try on shoes,” she said. “Not to mention for our children, it was the first time they were able to walk into a store and have a budget for gifts where they got to make the decisions and choices. To watch these kids whose families struggle financially, for them to have $150 and then think about family members before themselves is admirable and amazing in light of their circumstances.”

David Rainer is an award-winning writer who has covered Alabama’s great outdoors for 25 years. The former outdoors editor at the Mobile Press-Register, he writes for Outdoor Alabama, the website of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

13 hours ago

Ivey visits hometown Camden to commemorate bicentennial — ‘Y’all, Alabama has come a long way’

CAMDEN — On Friday, on the eve of the culmination of Alabama’s Bicentennial celebration set to take place in Montgomery, Gov. Kay Ivey paid a visit to her hometown to take part in an event marking the milestone in her home county of Wilcox.

Not far from where Ivey attended high school as part of Wilcox County High School’s class of 1963, the governor participated in a ceremony that also included Camden Mayor Bill Creswell and Wilcox County Commissioner Bill Albritton.

After offering a list of the state’s achievements, Ivey remarked on how far Alabama had come.

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“During these 200 years, Alabama has celebrated some pretty incredible people and milestones,” she said. “Building a rocket that took a man to the moon, our rich Native American history and culture, becoming the birthplace for civil rights, and becoming an international market for goods and products. Y’all, Alabama has come a long way.”

She also noted that the events leading up to the bicentennial celebration kicked almost immediately after she assumed the role governor in 2017 and led her to make at least one visit in all of Alabama’s 67 counties.

(Jeff Poor/YHN)

While speaking to the press at the return to her hometown, Ivey expressed how great she felt about being back in her hometown and what her goals were as the state heads into its third century.

“We’re proud to be here in Wilcox County and in my hometown of Camden to celebrate the bicentennial of Wilcox County, and tomorrow we’ll celebrate the bicentennial of Alabama. It is sure great to be home,” Ivey stated.

“Certainly, we want to keep the economy going, keep the everybody working, get more people that are not working to work,” she continued. “We just want to make the quality of life in our state really good, so everybody has an opportunity to be and do what they want to do.”

(Jeff Poor/YHN)

Ivey also offered some words of advice for her hometown and county in the pursuit of a better quality of life.

“Y’all just make this place an attractive place to live and do business, have a strong education system so people can put their children in schools, then in touch with the Department of Commerce to get prospects to look us over,” she said.

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University, the editor of Breitbart TV and host of “The Jeff Poor Show” from 2-5 p.m. on WVNN in Huntsville.

13 hours ago

Three Crimson Tide players, Auburn’s Derrick Brown named Walter Camp All-Americans

University of Alabama football players Xavier McKinney, Jaylen Waddle and Jedrick Wills, Jr. have been named to the Walter Camp All-America second-team, while Auburn University’s Derrick Brown made the first-team.

McKinney is a safety, Waddle is a wide receiver selected to the team as a returner on special teams, Wills is an offensive tackle and Brown is a defensive tackle.

The Walter Camp Foundation announced the honors Thursday evening at the ESPN Home Depot College Football Awards Show.

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McKinney, a junior, ranked 12th in the SEC in tackles with 85 through 12 games. He was also the Crimson Tide leader in tackles this season, including 4.5 for loss and two sacks. He forced four fumbles and added three interceptions to go with five pass breakups and four quarterback hurries. The star defensive back also returned one of his interceptions for an 81-yard touchdown.

Waddle led the nation in punt return average at 24.9 yards per return with 19 for 474 yards and a touchdown, including a long of 77. The sophomore also returned four kickoffs for 152 yards and one score and added more than 53 yards and six touchdowns on 32 catches at wideout this season. Earlier this week, he was selected as a first team All-American at returner by Pro Football Focus and named SEC Special Teams Player of the Year.

Wills anchored an offensive line that has surrendered only 12 sacks in 381 pass attempts this season. He graded out at over 91% for the Tide along the front allowing only one sack all season and only 3.5 quarterback hurries while missing only seven assignments in 714 snaps for a success rate of 99.9%.

Brown had a monster season on the defensive side of the ball and landed as a finalist for just about every national award possible. He was named the SEC Defensive Player of the Year by both the conference coaches and The Associated Press.

This is the 130th edition of the Walter Camp All-America team, the nation’s oldest such team.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

13 hours ago

Marshall applauds federal court ruling that plaintiffs challenging Alabama’s minimum wage law lack standing

The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the State of Alabama on Friday, saying that the plaintiffs challenging Alabama’s 2016 minimum wage law lacked standing to file their racial discrimination claim against the Alabama Attorney General.

The law being challenged holds that no Alabama municipality can raise its minimum wage higher than the state of Alabama’s minimum wage. The law was enacted by the state legislature after Birmingham attempted to raise the minimum wage paid by businesses in the city to $10.1o per hour. The minimum wage in Alabama is $7.25 an hour. Twenty-two states have similar laws to the one on Alabama’s books.

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In response to Alabama’s new law, the plaintiffs in question from Friday’s ruling filed a civil rights action in federal court arguing the law perpetuated white supremacy and violated the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment.

Notably, the court did not rule on whether the equal protection claim had merit, but rather ruled that the suit was wrongfully being brought because their alleged damages were not “fairly traceable” to conduct by the AG.

“I am pleased with the 11th Circuit’s ruling today, which agreed with the State of Alabama that the plaintiffs had no standing to sue the Attorney General over their complaints about Alabama’s minimum wage law,” said Attorney General Steve Marshall.  “I also think the substance of the plaintiffs’ challenge lacked merit, but the court withheld judgment on that question because the plaintiffs failed to show that the Attorney General ever harmed them.”

Henry Thornton is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can contact him by email: henry@yellowhammernews.com or on Twitter @HenryThornton95.

15 hours ago

Black Belt Workforce Center opens in Demopolis

Private and public officials gathered in Demopolis Friday to announce the opening of the Black Belt Workforce Center.

The center will provide training for job seekers and employers, job application assistance, resume help and a computer lab. The center will also provide retraining and retooling for job seekers who were previously in the workforce but need help competing for the jobs available today.

“We knew that we needed to serve some of our most critical areas in Alabama by creating a center in the Black Belt. This is a place for both job hunters and employers to find resources to help them succeed,” said West Alabama Works Executive Director Donny Jones.

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The center is a collaboration between West Alabama Works, the Southwest Alabama Workforce Development Council (SAWDC), Central Alabama Works, and numerous governmental and nonprofit stakeholders in the area. It will be helmed by Tammi Holley.

The center is very close to the Alabama Department of Labor’s facility in the area, a department with which the training center plans to work in concert.

Jim Page is the CEO of the West Alabama Chamber of Commerce, which houses West Alabama Works.

He told Yellowhammer, “Even though Alabama has got a very strong economy right now and we’ve got record low unemployment, there are still far too many people who are unemployed or underemployed.”

“A major reason for that is the lack of education, lack of training, and lack of certain skill sets needed to compete for jobs, or to get a better job. We’ve long felt it important to go into our more rural areas, particularly the black belt, to make the resources more readily available closer to the people, and meet them where they are,” Page added.

Unique among workforce development initiatives in Alabama is the partnership with a local drug prevention organization: The Parents Resource Institute for Drug Education (PRIDE). The Tuscaloosa-based PRIDE plans to work with the center to help increase drug prevention efforts in the surrounding community.

“One of the biggest problems that workforce development has is keeping kids where they can pass a drug screening,” Derrick Osborne, the Executive Director of PRIDE told Yellowhammer on the phone.

According to Osborne, PRIDE is “trying to help people understand addiction before they become addicted.”

He added, “We want to say, you don’t have to use a drug because you feel like there isn’t anywhere for you to go. There is hope, there are things to look forward to in your life.”

Henry Thornton is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can contact him by email: henry@yellowhammernews.com or on Twitter @HenryThornton95.