The Wire

  • Black Bear Sightings Continue to Increase in Alabama

    Excerpt from an Outdoor Alabama news release:

    Add Jackson, Limestone, Marshall, Morgan and St. Clair counties to the growing list of black bear sightings in Alabama in 2018. In recent years, bears have also been recorded in Chambers, Elmore, Jefferson, Lee, Macon and Tallapoosa counties. These recent sightings are more evidence of the state’s expanding black bear population.

    Biologists from the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources say the increase in sightings may be due to a combination of factors including changes in bear distribution, habitat fragmentation, seasonal movement and the summer mating season. However, most spring and summer bear sightings are of juvenile males being pushed out of their previous ranges by their mothers and other adult males.

    Historically, a small population of black bears have remained rooted in Mobile and Washington counties. Baldwin, Covington and Escambia counties on the Florida border host yet another population of bears. In northeast Alabama, bears migrating from northwest Georgia have established a small but viable population.

    “While seeing a black bear in Alabama is uncommon and exciting, it is no cause for alarm,” said Marianne Hudson, Conservation Outreach Specialist for the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries (WFF). “There has never been a black bear attack on a human in Alabama.”

    Black bears are typically secretive, shy animals that will avoid human interaction. Occasionally, a curious bear will explore a human-populated area in search of food.

    “If you are lucky enough to see a bear, simply leave it alone,” Hudson said.

  • Rep. Byrne Releases Statement on Russia

    From a Bradley Byrne news release:

    Congressman Bradley Byrne (R-AL) issued the following statement regarding President Donald Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, this morning in Helsinki.

    Congressman Byrne said: “I applaud President Trump’s decision to start a dialogue with President Putin and I’m glad he is making it a priority. However, we must remember that Russia is not an ally – economically or militarily. They are an adversary. The United States should not tolerate actions by the Russians that intervene in our domestic affairs or pose a threat to our national security.”

  • Alabama Recreational Red Snapper Season Closes July 22

    Excerpt from an Outdoor Alabama news release:

    The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Marine Resources Division (MRD) announces the closure of Alabama state waters to the harvest of red snapper by private anglers and state-licensed commercial party boats at 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 22, 2018. The quota of 984,291 pounds issued under NOAA Fisheries’ Alabama Recreational Red Snapper Exempted Fishing Permit (EFP) is expected to be met by the closure date.

    “Alabama anglers fished extremely hard on the good weather days during the season,” said Marine Resources Director Scott Bannon. “That level of effort, coupled with larger average-sized fish harvested this year as compared to last year, resulted in a daily harvest rate two times higher than 2017, which prompted an earlier than anticipated closure.

    “The purpose of the EFP was to demonstrate Alabama’s ability to establish a season and monitor landings within a fixed quota and I think we have shown we can do that,” said Bannon.

    Anglers are reminded of the following:

    — Possession of red snapper in Alabama waters while state waters are closed is prohibited regardless of where the fish were harvested.
    — Alabama anglers may fish in federal waters off the coast of Alabama (outside of 9 nm) and land in a state that is open to the landing of red snapper, but they must adhere to the open state’s rules and not transit in Alabama state waters with red snapper on board.
    — The season for federally-permitted charter for-hire vessels will close at 12:01 a.m. July 22.

11 months ago

YHRadio: Outside Political Action Committee from Louisiana throws hat in political ring for Roy Moore.

Outsiders are throwing money into Alabama’s Senate race. John Mathis of Baton Rouge, LA based “Solution Fund” Political Action Committee joins Yellowhammer Radio’s Scott Chambers, Andrea Tice and Chris Reid to explain why his PAC is backing Roy Moore.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

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YHRadio: Outside Political Action Committee from Louisiana throws hat in political ring for Roy Moore.

 
 
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YHRadio: Outside Political Action Committee from Louisiana throws hat in political ring for Roy Moore.

 
 
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11 months ago

Warrior Wednesday digs deep and tells the story of American heroes

Yellowhammer News pays tribute to the men and women of the armed services. Each week Warrior Wednesday host Scott Chambers talks to an American hero. In this behind the scenes video Chambers and Yellowhammer CEO Brian Ellis talk about the impact of Warrior Wednesday.

You can listen to the podcast each Wednesday at 2:30 PM on Superstation 101.1 WYDE in Birmingham, online at www.WarriorWednesday.com or by subscribing on iTunes or Stitcher.

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11 months ago

YHRadio: Former Congressman J.D. Hayworth talks Alabama Politics and the special senate election.

Former Arizona Congressman J.D. Hayworth joined Scott Chambers and Chris Reid on Yellowhammer Radio to discuss the special senate election. Hayworth talked about similarities of Alabama’s senate race and Arizona’s senate race. Hayworth is host of the J.D. Hayworth Show on Newsmax TV.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.


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YHRadio: Former Congressman J.D. Hayworth talks Alabama Politics and the special senate election.

 
 
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YHRadio: Former Congressman J.D. Hayworth talks Alabama Politics and the special senate election.

 
 
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11 months ago

YHRadio: Matthew Dowd, ABC News Chief Political Analyst, gives his evaluation on Tuesday’s special election

ABC News Chief Political Analyst, Matthew Dowd joined Scott Chambers, Andrea Tice and Chris Reid on Yellowhammer radio to discuss Alabama’s special senate election. Dowd also talked about the tense political climate in America and how to deal with it.

You can follow Matthew on Twitter @MatthewJDowd

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

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YHRadio: Matthew Dowd, ABC News Chief Political Analyst, gives his evaluation on Tuesday’s special election

 
 
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YHRadio: Matthew Dowd, ABC News Chief Political Analyst, gives his evaluation on Tuesday’s special election

 
 
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11 months ago

YHRadio: Mo Brooks is touting his conservative record leading up to Tuesdays special election

Senate Candidate Mo Brooks joined Scott Chambers, Andrea Tice and Chris Reid on Yellowhammer Radio to discuss Tuesdays special election. Brooks touted his conservative record, discussed attack ads from his competitors and how he wants to Ditch Mitch (McConnell).

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

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11 months ago

YHRadio: Luther Strange discusses getting endorsed by President Trump with Yellowhammer Radio.

Tuesday night was just a normal night for Luther Strange, then President Trump sent out a tweet that could change the senate race in Alabama. Around 8 PM the President tweeted “Senator Luther Strange has done a great job representing the people of the Great State of Alabama. He has my complete and total endorsement!”

Senator Strange joined Scott Chambers and Andrea Tice to discuss the endorsement from Trump and his run to keep his senate seat.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

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11 months ago

YHRadio: From Australia to Alabama, Mary Maxwell talks to Yellowhammer Radio about her run for Jeff Sessions former senate seat.

When Mary Maxwell heard about the special senate election in Alabama, she booked a flight on Qantas Airlines. One day after her arrival from Australia, she qualified to run for the U.S. Senate. Maxwell is traveling Alabama on Greyhound Bus to spread her message. Her campaign is self funded and says she hasn’t taken money from any outside sources. She describes herself as a states rights maniac. Maxwell holds a masters degree from Johns Hopkins, and a PhD and LLB from University of Adelaide in Australia.

Maxwell sat down with Scott Chambers and Andrea Tice of Yellowhammer Radio to discuss her unique run for the U.S. Senate. www.MaxwellforSenate.com

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. Learn more about Cord Sachs and Fireseeds at www.fireseeds.com

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Minister Scott Dawson talks about why he is running for governor.

Gubernatorial candidate Scott Dawson joined Scott Chambers, Andrea Tice and Chris Reid on Yellowhammer Radio. Topics include his views on education, infrastructure and religion.

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YHRadio: Minister Scott Dawson talks about why he is running for governor.

 
 
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YHRadio: Minister Scott Dawson talks about why he is running for governor.

 
 
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1 year ago

Tech and media entrepreneurial leaders are slated to speak at Sloss Tech

Telegraph Branding CEO Kevin McClendon discusses Sloss Tech. How Birminghams Sloss Festival is growing into large event like SXSW.

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Tech and media entrepreneurial leaders are slated to speak at Sloss Tech

 
 
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1 year ago

YHRadio: Senator Luther Strange strikes back at “fake news.”

Senator Luther Strange joined Scott Chambers and Andrea Tice on Yellowhammer Radio to discuss allegations by a political blog. Strange also discussed health care and working through the August recess.

Listen on Yellowhammer Radio

YHRadio: Senator Luther Strange strikes back at “fake news.”

 
 
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YHRadio: Senator Luther Strange strikes back at “fake news.”

 
 
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1 year ago

YHRadio: The Hollywood Conservative takes on Chelsea Clinton, California banning state officials from traveling to Alabama and other states.

The Hollywood Conservative, Amanda Head, joins Yellowhammer Radio for The Final 30. Topics include California Bans state officials from traveling to Alabama and other states. Johnny Depp threatens the president and Amanda takes on Chelsea Clinton.

Alabama native, Amanda Head brings a witty perspective that’s sure to burn elitist liberals. You can catch her every Friday at 12:30pm as she joins hosts Scott Chambers and Andrea Tice for “The Final 30 with Amanda Head,” only on Yellowhammer Radio.

The Final 30 is brought to you by McCutcheon Engineering: Professional Engineering Consulting Services

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Yellowhammer Radio talks to Cong. Mike Rogers on why it’s important to leave our country’s missile defense system in Alabama

Alabama Congressman Mike Rogers joins Yellowhammer Radio to explain how he’s standing in the gap for America’s main ballistic missile defense system.

Listen on Yellowhammer Radio

YHRadio: Yellowhammer Radio talks to Cong. Mike Rogers on why it’s important to leave our country’s missile defense system in Alabama

 
 
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1 year ago

YHRadio: Attorney for Airline Dog Attack Victim Speaks to Yellowhammer Radio

Ross Massey joined Yellowhammer Radio and discussed the attack on Marlin Jackson, of Daphne, AL. The mauling, on a Delta Airlines flight, left Massey’s client with serious injuries, requiring 28 stitches.

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Alabama Congressmen Gary Palmer and Mo Brooks Live Sharing Story of How God Spared Their Lives

1 year ago

YHRadio: Yellowhammer founder and former CEO, Cliff Sims comes on to discuss workforce development in Alabama and the country

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Troy University Head Football Coach Neal Brown Talks Football, Leadership, Culture

Coach Brown joined Scott Chambers and Andrea Tice of Yellowhammer Radio to discuss Troy University Football. Topics include The Trojans being ranked in the Top 25 defenses for 2017, Coach Brown’s leadership style, and the recent rule change allowing an early signing period in NCAA football.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

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1 year ago

Warrior Wednesday: Former Marine, Matt Pierce, an expert dog handler and explosive ordinance disposal technician, talks about his service and post military life with Xtreme Concepts.

Matt Pierce
Matt Pierce

Former Marine, Matt Pierce, an expert dog handler and explosive ordinance disposal technician, talks about his service and post military life with Xtreme Concepts.

Matt tells stories from his deployments, shares memories of his fallen brothers, reflects on memorial day, talked about some hilarious situations people put themselves in with explosives and discusses his job with Xtreme Concepts.

Sponsored by Xtreme Concepts and Kill Cliff, the Warrior Wednesday Podcast features the stories of American servicemen and women. It is hosted by Scott Chambers of Yellowhammer Radio. Check out the new Warrior Wednesday website and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

LISTEN: Former Marine, Matt Pierce, an expert dog handler and explosive ordinance disposal technician, talks about his service and post military life with Xtreme Concepts.

http://warriorwednesday.com/?powerpress_pinw=416-podcast

Warrior Wednesday: Former Marine, Matt Pierce, an expert dog handler and explosive ordinance disposal technician, talks about his service and post military life with Xtreme Concepts.

 
 
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Warrior Wednesday: Former Marine, Matt Pierce, an expert dog handler and explosive ordinance disposal technician, talks about his service and post military life with Xtreme Concepts.

 
 
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1 year ago

YHRadio: AL Gubernatorial candidate, David Carrington, wants to make Alabama Politics Boring again… In a good way.

Jefferson County Commissioner and Alabama Gubernatorial Candidate David Carrington discusses how he would run Alabama. Topics range from creating jobs, helping high school students know there are other good paying trades, balancing the state budget. Carrington a successful businessman, says he would run Alabama like a business. He jokes that his slogan should be Make Alabama Boring Again. Referencing the spotlight cast on the state with negative press and scandal that plagued previous administrations.

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Roy Moore discusses his candidacy for U.S. Senate

US Senate Candidate Roy Moore Spoke with Scott Chambers, Andrea Tice and Chris Reid. Moore discussed his positions and what he would do if elected to the US Senate.

Moore said he would not attack his opponents, he would let his record speak for itself. He understands he has detractors but wants the voter to make up their minds on the other candidates.

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Rep. Brooks comes on air to discuss his candidacy in the U.S. Senate race

From Alabama’s 5th Congressional district, Rep. Mo Brooks joins the Yellowhammer Radio to discuss his candidacy in the U.S. Senate race. Congressman Brooks believes his proven conservative leadership record is what sets him apart from the other candidates.

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Alabama leadership expert is back to discuss the myths of millennials, part 2

Cord Sachs is a Birmingham-based leadership expert and the CEO of FireSeeds, a company that helps companies find and grow great leaders and “the company behind many of Alabama’s fastest growing companies.”

The full conversation with Mr. Sachs can be heard on the Yellowhammer Radio podcast or in the video above, and a lightly edited transcript of his interview with Yellowhammer’s Andrea Tice and Scott Chambers can be read below.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Podcast on iTunes. Learn more about Cord Sachs and Fireseeds at www.fireseeds.com


Scott Chambers: Here we go! We are back, Yellowhammer Nation, it’s Yellowhammer Radio. Add YHN Radio on Twitter. Check us out online, Yellowhammernews.com, follow all the news of the day from Yellowhammer. So much on there, some great articles up today, Yellowhammernnews.com, check out all the great stuff on there.

Joined in studio now by our friend Cord Sachs who joins us each and every single Tuesday. Cord Sachs, of course, the founder of FireSeeds, and it’s a pleasure to see you here in studio with us today Cord.

Andrea Tice: Yes.

Cord Sachs: Yeah, it’s good to be back in the studio with you.

Scott Chambers: Glad to have you back man. We’ve had some really good conversations over the past few weeks and looking forward to continuing that on today.

Cord Sachs: Awesome. Yeah, so we’re gonna pick right back up, we talked about the Millennial myths, five of them, and we got through three of them.

Scott Chambers: Yep.

Cord Sachs: And you, being our resident expert here, I know you barely made the cut by a couple years, but

Scott Chambers: I’m glad you mentioned barely, okay. I’m in the upper end, guys.

Cord Sachs: But you are, officially, a millennial, Scott.

Scott Chambers: That’s correct.

Cord Sachs: You need to

Scott Chambers: I embrace it, just gonna embrace it

Cord Sachs: You embrace your identity

Andrea Tice: He’s not nearly as hard on his own generation, I think, but it hasn’t stopped Dave from calling him a snowflake.

Scott Chambers: Yeah, I’m no snowflake. Now, some of them are, Cord, some millennials are snowflakes.

Cord Sachs: Yeah, and that’s why we’re having this talk, because there’s so … There’s a lot of negative press that these millennials get

Scott Chambers: Exactly.

Cord Sachs: And so, we’re debunking the five myths. Let me put everyone in context here.

Scott Chambers: All right.

Cord Sachs: So everybody that’s listening is probably gonna fall into one three generations.

Scott Chambers: Okay.

Cord Sachs: 1946 to 1964, you guys are the boomers. If you can’t do the math, that’s about 53 to 71, 55 to 71, depending on the studies. 1965 to 1980, you’re the GenXers, that’s what me and Andrea, we fall into the Xers

Andrea Tice: We fall in there, yep.

Cord Sachs: And then the young buck across the table here is 1981 to 2000, that’s our millennials, so 17 to 39ish, millennials.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: That’s where we sit. So, our listeners are in one of those categories.

Scott Chambers: And Dave’s a boomer, so we’re completely covered here.

Cord Sachs: We got it covered. So I can see, lack of hair there, gets you your …

Scott Chambers: Watch it, watch it.

Cord Sachs: You’re a card-carrying boomer, so good. So yeah, so we covered the first three, any really if you think about it, the first three myths: Number one, millennials are entitled. You pushed back on that pretty hard there, Scott.

Scott Chambers: I did.

Cord Sachs: They’re disloyal. They’re independent. They don’t work well with teams. Those are the first three, and we debunked those.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: Those are not true, and we talked about why …

Scott Chambers: No, they’re not.

Cord Sachs: So we’re gonna pick back up … And I gotta give credit where credit is due. Gabriel Bosche has a great book called “The Five Myths of Millennials,” and she debunks these and goes into depth, so I encourage you to grab her book.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: So we’re gonna cover the final two.

Scott Chambers: The final two today.

Andrea Tice: Before you get started, Cord, just in the interest of fairness, did the woman who write that, is she a millennial?

Cord Sachs: Oh, absolutely she’s a millennial. So it’s all about …

Andrea Tice: Is she? Okay.

Cord Sachs: She tells her personal story, and she actually consults for Fortune 500, Fortune 50 companies on how they hire, how they recruit, and retain millennials …

Andrea Tice: Really.

Cord Sachs: How they evaluate them, just all the processes. I mean it’s …

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: Fifty percent of the workforce right now are millennials.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: By 2020, 65 percent of the workforce will be millennials.

Scott Chambers: Yep.

Cord Sachs: So, business owners out there, hiring managers out there, you better learn how

Andrea Tice: Yeah, I would say.

Cord Sachs: To attract this generation.

Scott Chambers: I love working with that generation because they’re some of the most creative that I’ve ever worked with.

Cord Sachs: They’re very creative.

Scott Chambers: They’re very creative.

Andrea Tice: So, whether you like it or not, this myth, you need to debunk it if you’re a business owner, because you’re … If 65 percent of the workforce, if that’s where we’re headed … You’ve got to be able, like you said, interact with these people and know what to offer them.

Cord Sachs: I had a good friend of mine, he’s director of sales for a company, and kind of an older company, I can’t say who it is of course, but he said he always gets in trouble, because the older ladies in his office, on his team, get on to him for texting at work. They really don’t understand that that’s a form of …

Scott Chambers: That’s a piece of communication.

Cord Sachs: The way, only way,

Scott Chambers: By some standards.

Cord Sachs: And if he’s not on the phone, he’s actually not working, he’s doing something

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: He’s socially inept, because he’s texting, even though that’s how

Andrea Tice: Yeah.

Cord Sachs: The majority of us now communicate.

Scott Chambers: Right, exactly.

Cord Sachs: Yeah. So let’s get into it. So if you had to guess, what is the one thing that drives our perspective of millennials as it pertains to this square little box that we have in our pocket that’s typically never in our pocket, it’s always in front of us. What do you think is driving this 4th myth?

Andrea Tice: The 4th myth that we know .. Do you want to name it right now, or

Scott Chambers: Always wired. I mean, always connected and plugged in.

Cord Sachs: Always wired, always connected, technology … So the myth is, they’re just addicted to technology.

Andrea Tice: Okay, got it, yeah.

Cord Sachs: And as the example I just gave … And therefore, that’s unhealthy because, of course, technology is all about fun, it’s all about play, it’s all about

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: Not being productive at work, and so really, the myth is really debunked, because they’re not. It has nothing to do, even with their desire for technology, as so much as it does have to do with their desire to be a part of a community.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: They want to be in an authentic community more than anything else. And it’s interesting where this comes from, because if you think back, we were raised, GenXers, by Boomers. Boomers came out of Post-World War II, and many of the fathers were either absent, they were at war …

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: Winning our freedom.

Andrea Tice: Right.

Cord Sachs: Or, when they came down … Honestly, their emotions were shut down. And so, I, and Andrea, we … In most cases, GenXers experienced a very distant, non-feely, non-emotional parenting. So what did we do as GenXers? We said, “We didn’t get any of that emotional feely stuff, and we’re gonna give it.”

Scott Chambers: Yes.

Cord Sachs: And we’re gonna swing that pendulum, and we’re gonna give it to these millennials.

Scott Chambers: Yes, you did.

Cord Sachs: And it’s gonna be all about their protection and … I mean, I used to ride my bike down in the neighborhoods across town without a helmet, without a cell phone, without a tracking device.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: All the time, and I’d come back when it was dark. So, now, of course, [crosstalk 00:06:08]

Scott Chambers: Raised by GenXers, that didn’t for me.

Cord Sachs: That’s right. They’ve got to have their helmet on, they gotta have their cell phone, there’s another tracking device. So we have comforted these millennials

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: And sheltered them in such a way to where … There’s much more of an emotional connection with the parents of millennials.

Scott Chambers: Definitely so.

Cord Sachs: All right? So when they get out into the workforce, they expect … I want to have that same kind of community that I felt, in most cases, by my Generation X parents.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: So, guess what brings them that, or the perception of what can bring them that? Technology.

Andrea Tice: Right.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: I mean, it’s all about socially being connected. So, it’s not as much about … They want to leverage technology, they can do things better, faster, more productive, and they are, with using technology, but it’s really about the social component of being connected. All right. The final myth

Scott Chambers: Let’s hear it Cord Sachs.

Cord Sachs: Is that they’re just unmotivated. Millennials are unmotivated.

Scott Chambers: Not true though.

Cord Sachs: So Scott, are you unmotivated?

Scott Chambers: No. I’m highly motivated by a lot of things … More than one thing at a time, which can be burdensome sometimes.

Cord Sachs: That’s right. And so, how do we motivate a millennial? First of all we’ve got to realize, they’re not unmotivated at all, but the way they’re motivated is they’re motivated through very clear goals that are attached to their unique identity and contribution.

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: They need to be empowered. Millennials hate to be micromanaged.

Scott Chambers: Oh gosh, yes. Micromanaging is awful.

Cord Sachs: Anybody hates to be micromanaged.

Scott Chambers: Yes.

Cord Sachs: I mean, they just kind of say things that the rest of us don’t say

Scott Chambers: Right.

Cord Sachs: But they detest being micromanaged. And so for them, if we can give them goal-oriented tasks that match their identity, and help connect the dots, and then connect the goals to the vision and mission of the company, the bigger cause, millennials want to be a part of something bigger than themselves.

Scott Chambers: Exactly.

Cord Sachs: There’s 65 percent of them that are gonna be running the work space, they’re gonna be running our country, and the awesome thing is, they want to change the world.

Scott Chambers: That’s right.

Cord Sachs: They want to have a huge impact outside of themselves.

Andrea Tice: So would that last myth that you just busted, it sounds like the millennial has a very specific laser of focus targeted area they want to work in, but they want to contribute it, it’s not all about them, they want to contribute all of that to the bigger cause.

Cord Sachs: That’s right.

Andrea Tice: The team, the group that they’re with.

Cord Sachs: They want to be in a community, and they want to know they’re working for a cause, and it aligns with who they are.

Andrea Tice: Okay. That’s great, good to know.

Scott Chambers: Very interesting stuff. Cord Sachs, it’s a pleasure having you in studio man. Tell people how they can get in touch with FireSeeds.

Cord Sachs: Great. Yeah, Fireseeds.com, come check us out. We’d love to connect with you and tell you more.

Scott Chambers: All right, Cord Sachs with FireSeeds, a pleasure seeing you, we’ll chat again next Tuesday sir.

Cord Sachs: Awesome, thanks guys.

Scott Chambers: All right, Andrea, final thoughts before we get out of there.

Andrea Tice: Hey, go love a millennial.

Scott Chambers: Yeah, hug a millennial today, we could use it every day. Until next time, never forget where you came from. If so, you might not find your way back home.

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Twinkle Cavanaugh on juggling motherhood, family and politics.

President of the Alabama Public Service Commission, Twinkle Cavanaugh joins Scott Chambers and Andrea Tice on Yellowhammer Radio to talk about women in politics. Mrs. Cavanaugh and YHRadio cover the ‘hangover’ of Hilary Clinton’s presidential race, Mrs. Cavanaugh’s own career, and a number of other topics.

The full conversation with Mrs. Cavanaugh can be heard on the Yellowhammer Radio podcast or in the video above.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Podcast on iTunes.

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1 year ago

YHRadio: Mayor Battle hopes to apply his Huntsville strategy for success to ALL of Alabama

Huntsville Major Tommy Battle joins Scott Chambers and Andre Tice on Yellowhammer Radio to talk about his recent announcement to run for Alabama Governor in 2018. Mayor Battle lays out his plan to improve the state, which includes a greater emphasis on education, attracting more economic prospects, and repairing the state highways that Scott Chambers commutes on.

The full conversation with Mayor Battle can be heard on the Yellowhammer Radio podcast or in the video above.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Podcast on iTunes.


Scott Chambers:

We are joined right now on the Yellowhammer news hotline by the one, the only Mayor Tommy Battle of Huntsville, Alabama. Mayor Battle welcome into Yellowhammer Radio. How are you doing, sir?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Doing fine, how are y’all doing this morning?

Scott Chambers:

Livin’ the dream.

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Good.

Andrea Tice:

Glad to have you on board. Excited to hear about you throwing your hat into the ring. I think this is the first time a mayor, this is what Scott has told me-

Scott Chambers:

This is true.

Andrea Tice:

That you are the first mayoral candidate to enter the governor’s race.

Scott Chambers:

Not enter the race, but there has never been a mayor in state history to take the office of governor.

Andrea Tice:

Got it.

Scott Chambers:

So how do you feel about your chances, Mayor Battle?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

We’ve never had a mayor elected governor, that’s why we’ve gotten into the problems that we’ve gotten into.’Cause mayors have to solve problems, it’s interesting, we solve problems in the grocery store line. We’re standing there getting groceries, somebody comes up to us and if there’s a problem, we have to take care of them.

And that’s the same way government’s gotta be. It’s gotta be a person to person government, and we’ve been very, very fortunate. In the north Alabama area we’ve had some great successes, and hopefully we can transfer those successes to the state.

Scott Chambers:

That’s a beautiful answer. That’s a great answer. ‘Cause Andrea and I were talking about this off the air. We’ve had no mayor elected as governor, but we need that because you guys, you balance budgets, you work with city councils, you work with the entire state to make your city prosper, and you’ve certainly done that in Huntsville. I first visited Huntsville when I was a kid, and then I guess when I was about 18 years old, I made my first trip solo to Huntsville to visit friends, and I’ve spent many, many weekends in that fine city over the years. And if you go back five years, you go back 10 years, especially 15 years, and you look at the progress in what you have done as mayor of Huntsville, a big pat on the back to you. Because Huntsville is a beautiful city and there’s been so much progress under your leadership.

Mayor Tommy Battle:

We’re real proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish. I moved up to Huntsville in 1980 from Birmingham. I grew up in Birmingham down on Rocky Ridge Road many moons ago. Went to Berry High School down there, and 10 to 60 percent of our people are from somewhere else. As we come in, we try to bring good ideas from areas … Some of the not so good ideas, we try to make sure they stay out of our public policy and it’s been a real successful track record that we’ve been able to do in the last 10 years with jobs, and schools, and education … And you know, touching on all the things that really helped our community grow and state grow.

Scott Chambers:

You mention education there, which is a real important thing for the state of Alabama. I know as mayor of Huntsville, you’ve overseen 250 million dollars in new school facilities. If elected governor of Alabama, will you continue that push for better education in the state?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Oh gosh, education is key. It’s paramount to being able to recruit industry and recruit jobs. Mrs. Battle was a kindergarten teacher for 27 years and now runs a little nonprofit that gives back materials to teachers. And education is the key for any of our success that we can have. We’ve got to make that one of the number one issues that’s out there because we have great education in a bunch of areas, in quite a few areas across the state, but then you have some key areas that we’ve gotta work on, and as we work on those key areas, and we can bring those up, it brings our whole economic prospects up for the state.

Scott Chambers:

Excellent. Well you know, that’s … Another thing that I want to talk about, and sometimes we laugh and joke because I drive. I live in Etowah county, in south side, and I drive to the studio every day to Birmingham. So, I drive roughly 140 miles round trip each and every day. I drive on state highways.

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Yes.

Scott Chambers:

State highways to someone that drives every day, it’s a pain in my rear, sir, and I know that you have overseen a pay as you go solution there in Huntsville for 500 million dollars in road and infrastructure projects. If elected governor of Alabama, will you assure me and all the other drivers out there we’re gonna have a good road system in this state?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Well, we’ve got to work on the roads. I mean, that’s gonna be key to us. When you start looking at I-65, which is over capacity [inaudible 00:04:13] and everybody knows that little slow down period just because you’re over capacity. And you compare 65 to what Georgia’s done on I-75 going north and south through the state.

Scott Chambers:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Mayor Tommy Battle:

I-75 is six, eight, 10 lanes all the way across.

Scott Chambers:

Right.

Mayor Tommy Battle:

We’re sitting here with the majority of 65 is four lanes. You just cannot compare. You compare the economic development of every interchange in Georgia on I-75 versus economic development on our interchanges on I-65. Those are things that you want to invest in, and it is an investment, it costs money, but you have to invest in that to become a prosperous state, to become a state with good jobs and good paying jobs, and to improve your job standards and your quality of living.

Andrea Tice:

Mayor Battle, I have a question. Scott mentioned the pay as you go program which you instituted or implemented at least in Huntsville

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Sure

Andrea Tice:

Can you explain that more to the person who’s not from Huntsville, who’s … This is a new concept and how that works and how it’s benefited your area?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Sure. We’re in Washington, D.C. right now and most of your state highway money and federal highway money is a 90/10 mix. 90 percent federal money and 10 percent local money. We stepped up with the state, and we went to the state because it was crucial that we had some roads built that would keep us on roads prosperity, keep us being able to bring in jobs, bring in industry.

So, we committed 25 million dollars a year to put to roads and road building, and that’s the 25 million dollars a year, year in and year out, that we’ve committed from now until through the foreseeable future. And the state matched our 25 million dollars. So they put up their 25 million dollars.

What it did, it helped them take the money that the state gives [inaudible 00:06:03] and really multiply it so that they can get more road projects out of it because we’re paying more than our fair share for it, and they can use it for somebody else’s match if they need to, but for us it was crucial to pay that just so that we could go ahead and get roads and we could get them into [inaudible 00:06:20] on them in the next seven to eight years. And as we’ve done that … And it’s a pay as you go, it’s not a bonded out, it’s not gonna have our kids paying for it for twenty years. We don’t have that generational debt which I almost call generational theft, which you know, we want something now but we don’t want to pay for it so let’s push it off on our kids. To me I think that’s one of the most important conservative values you can have is that you pay for what you get.

Andrea Tice:

All right, then while we’re talking about money, let me just change the topic just a little bit because there’s a story that came out recently about a woman in Birmingham who was able to defraud the Social Security System for probably roughly 10 years. Even after she was convicted of killing her own husband and that’s where she got the benefits from. Then we’ve got another story coming out of Florida, which is just one state over, of millions and millions of dollars being paid out in Medicaid fraud to people who had fraud allegations against them. So, let’s talk about that whole arena here in Alabama, and what would be some of the first steps you would take as governor to address that issue?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

You know, fraud abuse is something that we all need to jump on but it’s very tough to address situations where most of the work that they’re doing and they’re talking about doing is federal programs being administered federally.

Andrea Tice:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Mayor Tommy Battle:

We need to be more [inaudible 00:07:43] out in Washington. I’m in Washington right now and we’re talking to a congressional delegation and our senators and talking about the need for Medicaid. You need to have Block Grants coming down. The state knows how to administer that money much better than the federal government.

Andrea Tice:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Those kind of issues coming back home to us gives us a local control over it so that we can address what’s actually needed but also we can address the wrongs in the system also. As we work through this it’s gonna be very important to us that we continue to go to the federal government and try to get their fingers out of what we do in the state because I really feel like the state and our local officials have a better idea about where we need to go and what we need to do.

Scott Chambers:

So you’re definitely a states’ rights guy there

Mayor Tommy Battle:

(laughs) Definitely a states’ rights guy. I’m a local community guy. It’s kind of interesting, sometimes the state legislature will send things to the cities because they want to kind of control what the cities do and I keep looking at them and say “Man, y’all the guys that don’t want the federal government stepping into your business and then you step into a local situation.”

Andrea Tice:

Yeah.

Mayor Tommy Battle:

So, I think all of us need to stay in our lanes.

Scott Chambers:

Well our guest is Huntsville mayor Tommy Battle who is running for governor of Alabama and in the final few moments here I have one question and then I want to close out and find out who you are. But before we get to that I want to ask, you know the last administration that just left office in Montgomery … The word corruption keeps coming up, time and time again. Alabama politics have been known for corruption. If elected governor of this state, what will you do to cut down on corruption in Montgomery?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Well, I think it’s more important that we walk the walk rather than talk the talk. We’ve had many, many people talk the talk of, “I’m gonna do this, I’m gonna do that. Uhh, you know, uhh w-we’re all good Christian fellows who- who are running for office.” But more importantly, we’ve gotta walk that walk. For nine years we’ve been able to walk the walk of a good honest government that responds to the people, a government that addresses issues that are important. And that’s the only way to build confidence in your government. You’ve gotta tell the people “Hey, there’s a plan, there’s a strategy.” And the end result to that plan and strategy is jobs, is a prosperous community. And if you can make them understand that and work with them so that they can have confidence in you, that’s the only way to get confidence back in your government. And we have lost confidence in our government over the last three years with everything that’s gone on.

Andrea Tice:

Yes, that is true. I’m glad you’re identifying the confidence factor that’s been lost, the trust factor.

Scott Chambers:

No question. Well, in our final few moments here tell us: who is Tommy Battle? Tell us about yourself, for those that around the state, that in north Alabama, most everyone knows the name, knows who you are. In south Alabama, there’s a few people that may not know who the mayor of Huntsville is. So, who is Tommy Battle?

Mayor Tommy Battle:

You know, I think the biggest thing to say is that I learned a lot of values from my parents. I learned from my parents, my mom and my dad, the value of hard work. Working in the back halls of Britling’s Cafeterias which was the family business. Working back there you [inaudible 00:11:04] and everything else, you learn the value of hard work.

But also, going through … Growing up in Birmingham, working in Mobile part-time to get through school, coming to Huntsville … We’ve been able to have some achievements, and the great thing about it is, going to Montgomery it won’t have to be on the job training. We already have a strategy, a plan that has been very successful in the north Alabama area … Can we transfer that to Montgomery, and make Montgomery successful also, and can we pull back confidence in Montgomery? Those are some of the key issues that I think everybody should look at when they’re looking for their next gubernatorial candidate.

Scott Chambers:

Absolutely. Mayor Tommy Battle, we appreciate you being on with us here on Yellowhammer Radio today. We look forward to continuing this conversation as the campaign moves forward and look forward to having you here in studio with us some time.

Mayor Tommy Battle:

Great, I’m looking forward to it.

Andrea Tice:

All right, have a great time up there in D.C.

Scott Chambers:

All right, take care, sir. Absolutely.

Mayor Tommy Battle:

All right, thank you.

Scott Chambers:

Huntsville mayor Tommy Battle on Yellowhammer Radio we’ll come back and take your phone calls, go through some of the rest of the news of the day. You can listen to the program of course on 101.1 FM, 95.3 FM in Birmingham, and also 1260 AM as well. Check us out online, yellowhammernews.com, tweet the program @yhnradio. Your phone calls coming up next 866-551-9933. We are live from the call, KS.com heating and air studio.

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