The Wire

  • New tunnel, premium RV section at Talladega Superspeedway on schedule despite weather

    Excerpt:

    Construction of a new oversized vehicle tunnel and premium RV infield parking section at Talladega Superspeedway is still on schedule to be completed in time for the April NASCAR race, despite large amounts of rainfall and unusual groundwater conditions underneath the track.

    Track Chairman Grant Lynch, during a news conference Wednesday at the track, said he’s amazed the general contractor, Taylor Corporation of Oxford, has been able to keep the project on schedule.

    “The amount of water they have pumped out of that and the extra engineering they did from the original design, basically to keep that tunnel from floating up out of the earth, was remarkable,” Lynch said.

  • Alabama workers built 1.6M engines in 2018 to add auto horsepower

    Excerpt:

    Alabama’s auto workers built nearly 1.6 million engines last year, as the state industry continues to carve out a place in global markets with innovative, high-performance parts, systems and finished vehicles.

    Last year also saw major new developments in engine manufacturing among the state’s key players, and more advanced infrastructure is on the way in the coming year.

    Hyundai expects to complete a key addition to its engine operations in Montgomery during the first half of 2019, while Honda continues to reap the benefits of a cutting-edge Alabama engine line installed several years ago.

  • Groundbreaking on Alabama’s newest aerospace plant made possible through key partnerships

    Excerpt:

    Political and business leaders gathered for a groundbreaking at Alabama’s newest aerospace plant gave credit to the formation of the many key partnerships that made it possible.

    Governor Kay Ivey and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event which celebrated the construction of rocket engine builder Blue Origin’s facility in Huntsville.

4 weeks ago

Coach Bill Clark: UAB ready for football season preparations to start

(Mark Jerald/Alabama NewsCenter)
UAB football coach Bill Clark is like many fans who are waiting for a clear sign that the college football season is on the horizon this year.

With less than 90 days until the start of the season, that sign will be next week when UAB players report for voluntary individual workouts and training. Clark said that will progress into the more familiar pre-season camp between now and August.

“I’m excited to get them back, even in small numbers right now,” Clark said.

155

Coach Bill Clark: UAB ready for football season preparations from Alabama NewsCenter on Vimeo.

It’s been a challenging few months for everyone because of the COVID-19 pandemic and football was not immune. It eliminated the normal spring training and spring football scrimmages for all collegiate teams, and officials from all schools and conferences have been weighing whether and how to proceed with preparations for a season that at one time seemed uncertain.

Clark said he is confident the plan UAB has in place is a good one and he has one of the premier institutions to draw on for medical expertise.

“Rule No. 1 has always been athlete safety, so this is not something new for us,” Clark said. “Obviously, the COVID crisis was something new for us to deal with. The support of our athletic trainers obviously being at UAB with the medical school helps.”

(Courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter)

1 year ago

WATCH: Birmingham executive recalls childhood during Alabama civil rights movement

(Mark Jerald/Alabama NewsCenter)

If there was a civil rights demonstration in downtown Birmingham, you could bet that Willie Mae Buford was going to be there. That meant that her young son, Ron Buford, was also there because she made sure she brought him along.

They vividly remember the water cannons, police dogs and racial slurs hurled by former Birmingham Public Safety Commissioner Eugene “Bull” Connor and others as they gathered at Kelly Ingram Park for a peaceful demonstration against segregation. Many of the protesters were schoolchildren, including Ron Buford.

99

As a child, Buford imagined two things: Seeing the inside of the Alabama Theatre and having a job in one of those big buildings downtown.

As a young adult, he got to experience the former.

Today, Buford is director of legislative affairs and compliance at Alabama Power Company.

He can see Kelly Ingram Park from his office. He can also see progress everywhere and changed hearts in the people of the Magic City.

Here is his story.

Ron Buford recalls being a child in Birmingham civil rights movement from Alabama NewsCenter on Vimeo.

(Courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter)