1 year ago

Alabama linemen celebrated at fifth annual ‘Appreciation Day’

Opelika Power Services on Monday hosted the Yellowhammer State’s fifth annual Lineman Appreciation Day, sponsored by the Energy Institute of Alabama (EIA), recognizing the hardworking men and women tasked with providing electricity to the state’s residents every day, even in dangerous conditions and after severe weather strikes.

In a statement to Yellowhammer News, Public Service Commission President Twinkle Andress Cavanaugh expressed her appreciation for the linemen that keep Alabama running day and night.

“Linemen sacrifice countless hours away from their families and put their lives on the line year-round to keep our lights on,” Cavanaugh said. “These men and women provide an essential service to everyone in Alabama and are truly unsung heroes. They respond day or night, hot or cold, and in severe weather, to provide us all with safe and reliable electricity.”

“We are thankful for our linemen today and every day,” she emphasized.

Alabama’s annual Lineman Appreciation Day began as a statewide celebration following a resolution sponsored by State Rep. April Weaver (R- Alabaster), which established the first Monday of June as a day to recognize these dedicated individuals.

Weaver spoke on Monday about her own grandfather serving as a lineman and the personal sacrifices she has witnessed first-hand that linemen make every day to serve the citizens of the state.

Welcoming over 80 linemen and guests to the event, Opelika Mayor Gary Fuller remarked, “In good weather we love them, but in bad weather, we sure do appreciate them.”

The attendees witnessed Cullman Electrical Cooperative’s Jeff Osborn receive the Energy Institute’s Outstanding Service Award for his 12 years of exemplary service as a lineman, as well as his commitment to go above and beyond his daily work duties for the cooperative.

Former Alabama House Speaker Seth Hammett, EIA chairman, shared a story about Osborn organizing work days in the community to help citizens with much-needed yard work and home repair projects on his own time.

“What sets Jeff apart is his attention to detail and compassion for people he encounters each day,” Hammett said as he read Osborn’s nomination for the award.

Other active Alabama linemen attended the event, with two sharing their own perspectives of what it means to be a lineman. All were gifted backpacks for use in the field.

Hammett advised that the special recognition for linemen is important due to their unwavering commitment to serve the people of our state every day and in the worst of conditions.

“Our linemen are the face of our industry,” Hammett commented. “When people think about electric utilities, they think about linemen.”

Information about the newly created “Thank A Lineman” car tag was also shared at the event, including that the proceeds from the tag will benefit charities that support linemen and their families.

This comes after the National Lineman Appreciation Day, which has been celebrated annually across America on April 18 since a 2013 resolution passed by Congress.

Sean Ross is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

14 mins ago

Ledbetter named co-chair of Tuberville’s Senate campaign

Alabama House Majority Leader Nathaniel Ledbetter (R-Rainsville) has been named co-chair of Republican senatorial nominee Tommy Tuberville’s 2020 campaign, it was announced on Wednesday.

The former Auburn University head football coach cited the conservative lawmaker’s record of success in the State House among the key reasons for his selection.

“Majority Leader Ledbetter has spent the last three years working closely with Republican representatives and senators from every corner of our state, and the conservative reforms they implemented have made Alabama a better place to work, live, and raise children,” Tuberville said in a statement.

“His team built upon the GOP supermajority in Alabama during the 2018 campaign cycle, and his experience and instincts will prove to be invaluable as we head toward November,” the candidate added.

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Ledbetter joins Stan McDonald, a Huntsville attorney who has successfully helped lead the campaign leadership team, as a campaign co-chair. McDonald was chair of the pro-Tuberville Grit PAC before transitioning to the campaign itself.

Saying he was eager to begin working with the campaign staff to secure a Tuberville victory, Ledbetter stressed that the race is especially important since Alabama’s U.S. Senate contest could very well determine which party controls the Senate after this election cycle. The result could determine the direction of the country, Ledbetter advised.

Tuberville will face U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) in November’s general election.

“Since taking office, Doug Jones has voted twice to remove Donald Trump from office, opposed the nomination of conservative Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and joined the liberal faction that supports abortion and wants to grab our guns,” Ledbetter stated. “I am proud to help elect Coach Tuberville because it is time for Alabama to have a U.S. Senator who represents our conservative beliefs and values, not those of liberals who live in New York and California.”

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

47 mins ago

Alabama Power personnel head to Illinois in support of another storm recovery

Alabama Power Company crews are slated to arrive in Illinois on Wednesday to assist in storm recovery efforts after a deadly derecho pummeled midwestern states in recent days.

The Alabama Power team members heading to Illinois just completed restoration efforts in New Jersey related to Tropical Storm Isaias. More than 200 of the company’s lineworkers and support personnel assisted in the Garden State after more than 1 million residents were affected by the storm.

Personnel arriving in Illinois will support Commonwealth Edison’s (ComEd) restoration efforts.

As of Tuesday, more than 400,000 ComEd customers remained without power in metropolitan Chicago and northern Illinois.

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“We were in the right place to be able to move quickly from New Jersey to help the folks in Illinois,” stated Brian Lindsay, a manager in Alabama Power Company Power Delivery who is part of the company’s team heading to support ComEd. “Our crews are eager to support ComEd and their customers.”

Just as was the case in New Jersey, this is yet another example of Alabama Power offering and coordinating recovery work through the mutual assistance program of the Southeastern Electric Exchange, a trade association comprised of several member utilities.

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn

4 hours ago

Baldwin County Sheriff Hoss Mack: ‘Disappointed’ in Doug Jones; Tuberville needed to keep country ‘free,’ ‘strong’

For many voters, especially on the Republican side, the subject of maintaining law and order will be a priority when they cast their ballot in this November’s election.

According to Baldwin County Sheriff Huey Hoss Mack, the issue should be considered, especially when deciding whether to vote in Alabama’s U.S. Senate race between incumbent U.S. Sen. Doug Jones (D-Mountain Brook) and his GOP challenger former Auburn football coach Tommy Tuberville.

Mack told listeners during an appearance on Mobile radio’s FM Talk 106.5 on Tuesday it was important for Republicans to maintain control of the U.S. Senate, which put added importance on the Jones-Tuberville match-up.

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“You always look at every election as important,” he said. “I don’t think you can say there is no such thing as an unimportant election. But this one, and in particular our U.S. Senate race, is so important right now. Number one, just from the 3,000-foot view, the Republican Party can gain a seat back in the Senate. And as you know — you follow politics very closely — the Senate is the one body in our United States form of government that has an incredible amount of influence and power as it relates to legislation and to policy, and to funding. So, it is very important that we regain that seat.”

Mack acknowledged his support for Tuberville and expressed his disappointment in Jones, a former U.S. Attorney for the Clinton Justice Department, for his embrace of a “far-left philosophy.”

“From a personal perspective, of course, I’m voting for Tommy Tuberville,” Mack continued. “I hope that Tommy wins the race. When Doug Jones took office, I have to admit, I was a little bit disappointed because I’ve known Doug for years. He was a former United States prosecutor. And I was even familiar with some of the cases he prosecuted in the northern district. Since he has moved to Washington, he seems to have taken on a little bit more of that far-left philosophy in many areas but certainly as they relate to law enforcement. I feel that if we’re going to try to achieve some of the things that law enforcement needs to do to keep our country strong, to keep our country free and abide by the rights of the citizens, we need to elect somebody like Tommy Tuberville to that seat.”

Mack predicted issues of law and order and policing would be among the “top three” issues for voters in the November election, and a more discussed issue than if not ever, then at least since the early 1970s.

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University and the University of South Alabama, the editor of Breitbart TV, a columnist for Mobile’s Lagniappe Weekly and host of Mobile’s “The Jeff Poor Show” from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. on FM Talk 106.5.

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4 hours ago

7 Things: Biden selects Kamala Harris as running mate, lawsuit challenging Alabama’s mask mandate dismissed, SEC still wants to play football and more …

7. More funding for mental health programs

  • Governor Kay Ivey has announced that from some of the funding the state received through the CARES Act, $6 million is going to be sent to community health provider agencies and $1 million for the Alabama Department of Mental Health’s (ADMH) Crisis and Recovery Services program. 
  • ADMH will distribute the $6 million among about 300 agencies eligible for funds. Ivey said in a statement, “Like people around the globe, the people of our state are suffering, and I remain committed to providing the necessary support to get our state and her people back on our feet.”

6. Drop everything and get counted

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  • With a lot a stake for the state of Alabama, it is increasingly important that every Alabama resident take part in the 2020 U.S. Census. The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is making sure people know that by declaring today, “Drop Everything, Get Counted Day”
  • Kenneth Boswell, Alabama Counts! chairman and ADECA director makes the reasoning pretty clear, saying, “It should take each person roughly six minutes, but these six minutes are vital to Alabama’s future.” He is calling on employers to take time out of the day to ask employees to participate and then give them time to do so online.

5. TVA CEO pay being reviewed

  •  After President Donald Trump called out the Tennessee Valley Authority, the board reversed their foreign hiring decision, and now they are reviewing the $8.1 million in compensation for Tennessee Valley Authority president Jeff Lyash, interim chairman of the TVA board John Ryder has announced.
  • Ryder said that the board is committed “to doing what is best for the 10 million people in the Tennessee Valley.” He made sure to clarify that the review wasn’t of Lyash’s job performance, only of his pay that has made him the highest-paid federal employee.

4. Still no deal on coronavirus stimulus

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has said that throughout stimulus package negotiations, Democrats have been treating the pandemic as a “political game” as they are still unable to come to an agreement on legislation.
  • McConnell accused Democrats of blocking relief “over unrelated liberal demands” and even blamed the press, too, for covering “their stonewalling like any ordinary political standoff.” He added that they’re doing a “disservice” to people in America “to act like this has just been more ordinary Washington gridlock.”

3. PAC 12 and the Big Ten decide they don’t want to lose to the SEC this year

  • The college football season continues to take hit after hit with two marquee conferences, the PAC 12 and the Big Ten, deciding that they will postpone their seasons until the spring. Now that two of the big five of college football’s major conferences are quitting, the pressure is now on the SEC, Big XII and ACC to call it quits as well.
  • Most of the college campuses in these two conferences will still have students on campus in the fall. Players are not happy, and Wisconsin is continuing to practice. There were rumblings that some of the dissenting schools in these leagues might seek new homes to play college football this year but that seems to have been kiboshed.

2. Lawsuit against mask mandate dismissed

  • A lawsuit against Governor Kay Ivey, State Health Officer Dr. Scott Harris and the Alabama Board of Health has been dismissed by Montgomery County Circuit Judge Greg Griffin, but the attorney on the lawsuit, Seth Ashmore, has already said that his clients are planning to appeal.
  • The Jackson County residents who brought the lawsuit argued that the mask mandate was “illegally adopted” and created a “deprivation of liberty,” but the Alabama Emergency Management Act of 1955 gives the governor authority to make these sorts of mandates.

1. Surprise! Biden picked Kamala Harris

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden has officially named U.S. Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) as his running mate for the 2020 presidential election, which makes Harris the first black woman on a presidential ticket.
  • Biden and Harris will both be subject to criticism, though, as Harris formerly was critical about Biden and even said she believed the women who accused him of sexual assault and misconduct.