3 weeks ago

Greenville, Ala. mayor warns Trump proposed tariffs would have detrimental impact on his city

GREENVILLE — Although many Alabamians seem to welcome President Donald Trump’s pushback against the shift to a global economy, there could be consequences for some of Alabama’s small towns.

In an interview with Yellowhammer News recently, Greenville Mayor Dexter McLendon said Trump’s proposed tariffs on imported aluminum and steel would have consequences for Butler County’s economy.

A short ride north on Interstate 65 from Greenville is Hyundai Motor Manufacturing facility, which it and many of Hyundai’s local vendors stand to lose from a tariff.

“The biggest thing that is facing us right now is the tariff tax,” McLendon said. “That’s something the president wants to do. We’ve got a lot of Korean companies here. They’ve been to see me. They’ve also been to see [Richard] Shelby, Representative Roby and they’re really concerned about that. They get a lot of steel here. Hyundai Steel has provided a lot of steel to Hyundai cars. If they have to start paying these tariffs and everything, it could affect them. So, we’re concerned about that. They’re a big part of our economic development here.”

Following the interview with Yellowhammer, McLendon raised the issue to Rep. Martha Roby (R-Montgomery) during a question-and-answer session of a luncheon hosted by the Greenville Rotary Club.

Roby explained there could be exemptions to the tariff that would address his concerns, but said she had not seen the specifics of Trump’s proposal.

“What the answer is going to have to be is I’m going to update you as we learn more information about processes,” she said. “I am hearing what you’re hearing in the same real-time that you’re hearing it in terms of exemptions of countries and exemption processes that would relate to certain types of industry.”

Roby vowed to stay in contact as she learned more.

@Jeff_Poor is a graduate of Auburn University and is the editor of Breitbart TV.

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14 mins ago

University of Montevallo breaks ground on new Center for the Arts

The University of Montevallo this week held the groundbreaking for its new multi-million-dollar Center for the Arts.

The 36,000-square-foot facility will allow the College of Fine Arts at UM to provide a more comprehensive teaching and learning space giving fine arts programs a location to collaborate more across disciplines.

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“This facility is to create a new kind of environment that draws together students and faculty from all of the departments,” said Dr. Steven Peters, dean of the College of Fine Arts. “Our students and professors will have the opportunity for more conversations across disciplines in the arts and encourage more high quality, specific and interdisciplinary activity. This will be a creative engine for discovery and innovation.”

The Center for the Arts will provide opportunities for campus and community use with the following key features:

• Performance venues and hospitality space
• University art gallery
• Theatre Department offices and multipurpose classrooms and studios
• Multi-use digital fabrication lab
• Scene design and wardrobe shops along with versatile storage spaces

“I am thrilled that we, at Davis Architects, have been fortunate to work with the University of Montevallo and their outstanding theatre, music and art faculty and staff to bring to reality this wonderful new facility that they need and deserve,” said Don Cosper, Davis Architects.

The performance venue will include a 350-seat theater with state-of-the-art acoustics and technology for music concerts and theater performances, a 100-seat black box theater and a courtyard suitable for outdoor performances and receptions. Overall, the Center is a $25 million investment for the University.

“It’s exciting to be part of a historic project for the University of Montevallo,” said Ken Upchurch, TCU Consulting Services, LLC. “Working with Dr. Stewart on this project to connect the University, the arts, and the Montevallo community has been a true pleasure.”

The additional classrooms and labs will serve as a major asset for the University of Montevallo’s college’s recruitment program.

“This new Center for the Arts will be a state-of-the-art facility able to accommodate growth including up to 150 students in the fine arts programs over the next five years,” said Dr. John W. Stewart III, president of the University of Montevallo. “The cross function of disciplines under one roof will provide students with more marketable skills for their future occupations.”

Not only will the new Center for the Arts serve to promote integrated thinking within the University, it will also act as an artistic hub for the community.

“The facility will immerse students’ experiences in the arts,” said Peters. “The impact on the University of Montevallo, the Shelby County community and our university will be endless.”

The College of Fine Arts’ work focuses on creativity — but not only on creativity: the school’s mission includes integrating undergraduate education with arts advocacy and leadership, diversity and inclusion, engagement with social and cultural issues and partnership with individuals and organizations locally and regionally. University of Montevallo faculty and staff, as well as Shelby County leaders believe this new facility will prepare students to join the next wave of professional artists, performers, musicians, arts educators and communication experts.

“This beautiful new facility will benefit Shelby County and the State of Alabama as a whole,” said Alex Dudchock, Shelby County Manager. “We are taking the business approach to attract national and regional talent. Our goals include student retention and growth, as well as working to keep Montevallo graduates staying in Shelby County.”

Regardless of major, students are being guided to find their own creative signature, to discover what kind of independent thinkers they are, how they are uniquely creative, how they can become more thoughtful communicators and problem-solvers and how they can become more productive, creative collaborators. By doing so, the community is endeavoring to build the 21st century creative workforce at this beautiful place called Montevallo in the heart of Alabama.

“The College contributes to the development of intellectual curiosity, artistic depth and breadth. It provides a solid liberal arts foundation and professional training according to the highest standards to prepare our students to pursue the career trajectory they may choose,” said David Wheeler, Board of Trustees, University of Montevallo. “For us, an education in the arts is central to the academic mission of UM since it is a kind of liberation—a framework for creative interaction with the world.”

2 hours ago

Senate will now allow senators to bring their babies on the floor

The United States Senate unanimously voted Wednesday night to allow senators to bring their children under the age of one onto the floor.

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Senators with a baby are now able to have their children with them during votes — a move Sen. Tammy Duckworth pushed. The previous rule banned senators from bringing babies, which may have proven problematic for lawmakers trying to balance being a parent and working on Capitol Hill late at night.

“By ensuring that no Senator will be prevented from performing their constitutional responsibilities simply because they have a young child, the Senate is leading by example and sending the important message that working parents everywhere deserve family-friendly workplace policies,” Duckworth said of the measure.

Duckworth became the first senator to give birth while in office, causing her to push for the rule change allowing babies on the Senate floor. While some senators voiced concern about breastfeeding or crying, other lawmakers believed it could be beneficial.

“I think it will do us good in the United States Senate, every once in a while, to see a pacifier next to the antique inkwells on our desk or a diaper bag next to one of these brass spittoons which sits on the floor, thank goodness, never used,” Sen. Dick Durbin said.

(Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.)

Alabama nonprofit connects communities through the power of social media

Impact your world. Make a difference. Donate.

These are the mantras of Serquest, a new way to give.

Founded by Henry Hammond Cobb IV of Montgomery, the goal of the nonprofit is, “to help connect companies to a powerful nonprofit narrative in their community, where they can invest their time, money and physical resources into life-changing transformation in the city they do business, to change their focus to telling people who they are instead of what they do.”

And it has seen big successes.

Take Good People Brewing, for example. Serquest created a video about Good People Brewing and their involvement with Kings Home, ultimately driving more than 1.5 million views.

Want to watch it, too? See:

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“We realized that the best way to introduce people to our software platform was to help them create powerful media they could deploy to engage their audiences on fundraisers, volunteer events and needed items to distribute in the community to those who need it the most,” said Cobb.

How did this idea start?

When Cobb’s grandfather passed away, he was presented with 20,000 square feet of warehouse space to empty and no great system to do so. After weeks of phone calls, he met someone with an idea: Sell it on a Facebook yard sale group.

“Like magic, in the course of a couple days everything was gone,” said Cobb.

“I realized that what the nonprofit world or industry needed the most was a platform designed to help connect people who have resources to people who need resources efficiently and effectively,” and Serquest was born.

Serquest has helped more than 50 nonprofits since its inception, connecting nonprofits and companies with resources and volunteers.

Companies like Golden Flake.

Cobb is proud of the support Golden Flake has been able to give to Big Oak Ranch, “through building the girls boutique and the boys store and helping to make great citizens in our state by starting early with children.”

And Tacala and the Phoenix Club that helps Boys and Girls club in Birmingham, he said.

But Serquest isn’t done yet.

Cobb says, “Our dream is to create digital roads and bridges to connect individuals and companies to a story they want to define their life and help them get started today.

“It should be almost as easy as hailing an Uber.”

Serquest’s role is to remove roadblocks and to connect communities who want to make a difference — whether at companies, schools or churches.

“In many ways a church is an aggregator like a school or college, and so what we’re trying to do with our Facebook app is have it so any church, school or company can put it on their Facebook page to create this outreach platform to connect members to outreach opportunities,” said Cobb.

In other words, Serquest wants to help you.

“If you run a church, a school or a big hospital, we’re a digital resource to connect the large amount of people that come to you with the large amount of groups that come to you.”

Visit Serquest.com today to learn more about their digital tools.

3 hours ago

Trump: Prisoner of the war party?

“Ten days ago, President Trump was saying ‘the United States should withdraw from Syria.’ We convinced him it was necessary to stay.”

Thus boasted French President Emmanuel Macron Saturday, adding, “We convinced him it was necessary to stay for the long term.”

Is the U.S. indeed in the Syrian civil war “for the long term”?

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If so, who made that fateful decision for this republic?

U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley confirmed Sunday there would be no drawdown of the 2,000 U.S. troops in Syria, until three objectives were reached. We must fully defeat ISIS, ensure chemical weapons would not again be used by Bashar Assad and maintain the ability to watch Iran.

Translation: Whatever Trump says, America is not coming out of Syria. We are going deeper in. Trump’s commitment to extricate us from these bankrupting and blood-soaked Middle East wars and to seek a new rapprochement with Russia is “inoperative.”

The War Party that Trump routed in the primaries is capturing and crafting his foreign policy. Monday’s Wall Street Journal editorial page fairly blossomed with war plans:

“The better U.S. strategy is to … turn Syria into the Ayatollah’s Vietnam. Only when Russia and Iran began to pay a larger price in Syria will they have any incentive to negotiate an end to the war or even contemplate a peace based on dividing the country into ethnic-based enclaves.”

Apparently, we are to bleed Syria, Russia, Hezbollah and Iran until they cannot stand the pain and submit to subdividing Syria the way we want.

But suppose that, as in our Civil War of 1861-1865, the Spanish Civil War of 1936-1939, and the Chinese Civil War of 1945-1949, Assad and his Russian, Iranian and Shiite militia allies go all out to win and reunite the nation.

Suppose they choose to fight to consolidate the victory they have won after seven years of civil war. Where do we find the troops to take back the territory our rebels lost? Or do we just bomb mercilessly?

The British and French say they will back us in future attacks if chemical weapons are used, but they are not plunging into Syria.

Defense Secretary James Mattis called the U.S.-British-French attack a “one-shot” deal. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson appears to agree: “The rest of the Syrian war must proceed as it will.”

The Journal’s op-ed page Monday was turned over to former U.S. ambassador to Syria Ryan Crocker and Brookings Institute senior fellow Michael O’Hanlon: “Next time the U.S. could up the ante, going after military command and control, political leadership, and perhaps even Assad himself. The U.S. could also pledge to take out much of his air force. Targets within Iran should not be off limits.”

And when did Congress authorize U.S. acts of war against Syria, its air force or political leadership? When did Congress authorize the killing of the president of Syria whose country has not attacked us?

Can the U.S. also attack Iran and kill the ayatollah without consulting Congress?

Clearly, with the U.S. fighting in six countries, Commander in Chief Trump does not want any new wars, or to widen any existing wars in the Middle East. But he is being pushed into becoming a war president to advance the agenda of foreign policy elites who, almost to a man, opposed his election.

We have a reluctant president being pushed into a war he does not want to fight. This is a formula for a strategic disaster not unlike Vietnam or George W. Bush’s war to strip Iraq of nonexistent WMD.

The assumption of the War Party seems to be that if we launch larger and more lethal strikes in Syria, inflicting casualties on Russians, Iranians, Hezbollah and the Syrian army, they will yield to our demands.

But where is the evidence for this?

What reason is there to believe these forces will surrender what they have paid in blood to win? And if they choose to fight and widen the war to the larger Middle East, are we prepared for that?

As for Trump’s statement Friday, “No amount of American blood and treasure can produce lasting peace in the Middle East,” the Washington Post Sunday dismissed this as “fatalistic” and “misguided.”

We have a vital interest, says the Post, in preventing Iran from establishing a “land corridor” across Syria.

Yet consider how Iran acquired this “land corridor.”

The Shiites in 1979 overthrew a shah our CIA installed in 1953.

The Shiites control Iraq because President Bush invaded and overthrew Saddam and his Sunni Baath Party, disbanded his Sunni-led army, and let the Shiite majority take control of the country.

The Shiites are dominant in Lebanon because they rose up and ran out the Israelis, who invaded in 1982 to run out the PLO.

How many American dead will it take to reverse this history?

How long will we have to stay in the Middle East to assure the permanent hegemony of Sunni over Shiite?

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of a new book, “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

(Creators, copyright 2018)

New organization to promote Mobile-Tensaw River Delta

A new group known as the Alabama Delta Alliance has come together to promote the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta (MTRD) and its many natural resources. The Delta Alliance Alliance will support the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta, which is America’s second largest delta and the most bio-diverse body of water in the world.

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This alliance is comprised of a diverse group of individuals, organizations and businesses that want to promote and enhance this ecological wonderland.

“The Alabama Delta Alliance is a group that shares a deep appreciation for the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta and the many benefits it offers the people of this state,” said Britton Bonner, chairman of the board of the Coastal Alabama Partnership. “Our goal is to build a robust, diverse coalition and effort focused solely on promoting the MTRD region — now and in the future.”

Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson called the initiative “an idea whose time has come,” adding, “The delta is a hugely untapped resource for eco-tourism.”

For generations and well over a century, Alabamians and others have enjoyed the way of life and serenity of the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta. The MTRD is home to more than 600 species of fish, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and birds. With habitats that include huge swaths of swamps, marshes and wetlands, it is a veritable maze of tributary creeks, rivers, streams and bayous.

“Our newly created effort will serve as a resource to further educate the public on the biological and ecological diversity of the MTRD, the expansive flora and fauna, as well as the many recreational opportunities available to all regardless of interest or income level,” said state Rep. Randy Davis, whose legislative district abuts the delta. “A major goal of our effort will be to catalog the many access points, boat ramps, trails, local businesses and other important destinations the public will want to have at their fingertips when planning a trip in the MTRD.”

The Alabama Delta Alliance is encouraging people to learn more about the delta in hopes they will be inspired to visit the region. With the goal of promoting ecotourism in the area, the Alliance has created a new website as a tool for both visitors and residents alike, at www.alabamadelta.com. The website offers visitors a history of the delta, places to visit and information about alliance and steering committee members who are committed to the effort.

“Our website will be representative of the diverse people and organizations that are working with us,” said steering committee member Russell Ladd. “The interactive map will serve as a great resource that we can promote through social media and other digital channels, encouraging more visitation and driving ecotourism in the region.”

This steering committee is comprised of long-time delta supporters. Additionally, the organization has the support of more than 40 members from across the state.

Steering committee members believe that state and local management practices are adequately protecting and expanding access to the MTRD region. Federal designations and oversight often come with limitations on access and management of those properties, and it’s important to maintain the quality of life and outdoor recreational heritage by continuing to allow the state to manage this important natural resource.

“Our goal is to protect the many natural resources and the vast biological diversity that the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta enjoys,” Ladd added. “By getting involved in our effort, people are ensuring that we can continue to provide these important lands all throughout the region for future generations to enjoy.”