4 weeks ago

Alabama GOP Chairman Lathan: U.S. Senate defeat a ‘one-and-done,’ ‘Infrastructure of the party is strong in 67 counties’

ALGOP Chairman Terry Lathan


MONTGOMERY — Friday night after a packed room watched Fox News Channel’s Pete Hegseth rally attendees at the Alabama Republican Party’s Winter Dinner, party chairman Terry Lathan said there was cause for optimism for the party.

A lot of new faces were in attendance at the annual gathering, which was likely a product of many seats opening up in the Alabama legislature and a soon-approaching 2018 campaign season.

Lathan argued those new faces were the sign of a healthy party.

“You had over 600 people here tonight,” she said an interview with Yellowhammer News. “That’s pretty strong messaging for the party. And they have actually come from almost every county in Alabama. So that’s really great. We had so many elected officials here, so many candidates here. In the legislature, yeah there’s going to be some turnover. We are fully convinced they are going to be Republican faces as well. We let the people pick in the primary. As long as our candidates, and then become elected officials, stand on conservative policies and principles.”

This event was the first major for the ALGOP coming out of the 2017 U.S. Senate special election that was a stunning defeat for Republicans with the election of Doug Jones. Lathan shrugged it off as an anomaly and insisted the state of the party was strong.

“We’re a solid Republican state,” she said. “I call that a one-and-done. I even have some Democrat friends that said, ‘Yeah, that was probably the best we’re going to get in a long time.’ The fact of the matter is the infrastructure of the party is strong in 67 counties for the Alabama Republican Party. And also, it’s the messaging. People are not liberals in this state. They’re still conservatives.”

“That was an election that had some very harsh circumstances surrounding it,” she added. “You can see by this sold out, packed out room of over 600 people tonight that we’re as strong as we’ve ever been.”

She dismissed the efforts of Democrats trying to capitalize on Jones’ win by suggesting there was a momentum shift within Alabama in favor of the Democratic Party.

“I can understand if some of them feel like they do,” she added. “The reality is if you don’t change your policy, you’re not going to win in this state overall. You’re just not. If you’re going to embrace the Democratic Party and try to act like you’re a conservative, that’s not going to fly with us here. You cannot say ‘my leaders are Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, but I really don’t think like they do.’ Well, if that’s the case you need to come look at the Republican Party and get that straight.”

Jeff Poor is a graduate of Auburn University and works as the editor of Breitbart TV. Follow Jeff on Twitter @jeff_poor.


16 mins ago

Alabama Rep. Rogers clears the air about his “failed joke” on The Ford Faction

Congressman Mike Rogers called into The Ford Faction on Wednesday to clear the air about a joke he made about accents and discusses his views on Alabama politics.

Subscribe to the Yellowhammer Radio Presents The Ford Faction podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.

13 hours ago

End the shutdown politics

For far too long, Congress has relied on short term, stop-gap funding bills to keep the federal government open and running — and have done so when up against holidays and midnight deadlines.

Take the most recent continuous resolution: last month, as a member of the House of Representatives, I voted around 5:30 AM on a Friday morning against a massive spending bill that raises America’s deficit next year to about $1 trillion.


Yes, you read that right. While you and your family were sleeping, a handful of your duly-elected representatives were making deals in the middle of the night. For the last 40 years — but increasingly more so in the last decade — this has been and is the way Washington operates. It needs to end now.

Put simply, this is how it works: time is running out as Congress approaches a funding deadline. In exchange for their votes, appropriators demand more money for “insert name of pet project” and the spending bill balloons as more and more wish list items are added. Inevitably, one party demands more or they’ll threaten to walk from the deal.

A small leadership team from both sides then hammer out a deal behind closed doors — with Republicans agreeing to spend even more money America does not have, has to borrow to get, and cannot afford to pay back. This is what Washington did in February with its “debt junkie” spending bill and what it’s poised to do again this week.

Moreover, these last-minute side deals for unrelated, often deemed “must-pass” legislation, have no business being in a continuing resolution and should be voted on as stand-alone bills. But because of threatened government shutdown risks, the bulk of Congress is subject to the spending demands of the powerful few.

The party in power almost always loses in the game of shutdown politics, as it suggests the party does not know how to govern and does not deserve to govern. In the late-night rush to negotiate a deal, the powerbrokers eventually concede, bad policy is enacted, and Congress is pressured to vote for the deal to please some segment of their constituency. It’s a loss on both sides of the aisle.

Perhaps even worse, the country loses — big time — as bills are introduced and voted on before the public has time to digest them and submit their views to their elected officials. Transparency in government becomes nonexistent. And the deficit increases exponentially.

Let’s take a quick look at previous short-term continuous resolutions.

Remember the cromnibus back in 2013? At the time, the last-minute Christmas bill seemed monstrous with the approved $63 billion increase in spending authority over two years. That’s pocket change compared to the McConnell-Schumer Deal that passed last month and busted the discretionary budget spending caps by $296 billion over two years. All this adds up to trillions of dollars, and as a result of the February continuous resolution vote, deficits will blow through the $1 trillion mark annually and indefinitely.

While Congress seems hell-bent on passing unaffordable spending bills and adding trillions to America’s debt, eventually the gravy train is going to an end and become a train wreck because America simply can’t afford these expensive deals.

That’s why last week I introduced H.R. 5313: The End Federal Shutdowns Act. This legislation automatically requires continuity of spending at the previous year’s levels should Congress fail to pass spending bills on time. Hence, government shutdowns become a thing of the past.

The concept is simple: whatever the spending level was for the previous year becomes the spending level for such time as it takes Washington to pass legislation that changes priorities and reallocate different spending amounts. If this legislation were enacted, leadership of both parties would have no choice but to aggressively seek timely regular order agreement and passage of appropriations bills to achieve new funding and policy objectives. A flat-spending alternative would be a strong incentive for constructive compromise involving a majority of representatives.

Providing for an automatic continuous resolution should be the easiest vote most of us in Congress make this year. It provides stability for the federal government and prevents rank and file members from being held hostage to the demands of special interest groups, leadership, and powerful appropriators.

I’m urging my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to come together and do what’s right for the Congress and for the country. A vote for H.R. 5313 is common sense — something that seems to be lacking in Washington these days.

Let’s stop shutdown politics once and for all.

U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks is a Republican from Huntsville

13 hours ago

Christy Swaid is a 2018 Yellowhammer Woman of Impact

When pro sports star Christy Swaid first moved to Alabama in 2002, she said she immediately fell in love with her new home, but it broke her heart to learn that the state ranks in the top three nationally for diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and hypertension and that Alabama children are developing type 2 diabetes at one of the fastest-growing rates in the nation.

Swaid, a 2018 Yellowhammer Woman of Impact, is a six-time world champion professional jet ski racer, the winningest female in the history of the sport, and was twice named “One of the Fittest Women in America” by Competitor Magazine in 2000 and by Muscle and Fitness in 2001.


After years advocating for marine safety, Swaid channeled her extensive fitness experience and passion for service into launching a nonprofit in 2006 named HEAL (healthy eating active living) with a mission to use evidence-based methods and education to “measurably improve children’s health and reverse the growing epidemic of childhood obesity,” according to HEAL’s website.

“My heart and mission is to help children prevent diseases before they get established, but then follow them throughout their school experience with more healthy eating, active living techniques and encouragement,” Swaid said in a January Alabama Public Television interview.

Swaid tested her curriculum-based fitness and nutrition program in a six-month pilot program that measured results in fifth grade PE classrooms at 10 Alabama schools and found promising results among participating children: 75 percent showed improved fitness, 57 percent of overweight and obese children reduced their body mass index (BMI), and all participants reported improvements in healthful eating.

The program has steadily expanded, serving 130 Alabama schools in 27 counties and reaching 27,000 students across multiple grade levels. There are 175 schools on a waiting list pending funding; HEAL raises their own funds to offer the program to schools at no cost.

Last year, four Alabama schools using the HEAL curriculum earned an “America’s Healthiest School Award” from the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, whose judging standards include the healthiness of meals and snacks served, how much students move at school, and the quality of physical and health education.

“I am so proud of our state,” Swaid told APT. “Ten years ago, this was a kitchen table conversation, and I was able to glean the brightest and the best minds who also have big hearts to help put their fingerprints in making the most progressive solution to our nation’s worst epidemic, and that is what HEAL is … a genius cluster.”

Swaid developed her research-based curriculum in partnership with professors from UAB and Samford University.

“It is all science-based and it’s friendly, and it includes every child, including children with special needs,” she said.

Swaid will be honored with Gov. Kay Ivey in an awards event March 29 in Birmingham. The Yellowhammer Women of Impact event will honor 20 women making an impact in Alabama and will benefit Big Oak Ranch. Details and registration may be found here.

Rachel Blackmon Bryars is managing editor of Yellowhammer News.

14 hours ago

Alabama eyes potential economic impact of fatal deer disease

A fatal deer disease is inching closer to Alabama, where whitetail deer are the most popular game animal and hunting generates a $1.8 billion yearly economic impact.

The Montgomery Advertiser reports that a dead buck tested positive for chronic wasting disease in Mississippi’s Issaquena County last month; until then, the closest state to Alabama with the neurological disease was Arkansas.


Chuck Sykes with the Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division says it’s unlikely a diseased deer would wander “over an imaginary line on a map,” but that infected meat or animals could be brought in knowingly or unknowingly. Alabama has banned the import of carcasses from states where CWD has been confirmed.

The department says states with CWD have seen an up to 40 percent decrease in hunting license sales.

(Image: Outdoor Alabama)

(Associated Press, copyright 2018)

14 hours ago

Alabama ranks 4th most federally dependent state

Alabama is the fourth most federally dependent state in the union, according to analysis done by the personal finance website WalletHub.

The details:

Researchers compared the 50 states by examining both the dependency of state governments and of state residents.


To determine state government dependence, researchers looked at federal funding as a share of state revenue in each of the states.

To determine the dependency of residents, researchers used returns on taxes paid to the federal government and each state’s share of federal jobs as metrics.

Alabama’s state government was ranked the thirteenth most federally dependent and Alabama’s residents were ranked fourth most dependent.

New Mexico, Kentucky and Mississippi were ranked the three most federally dependent states.

In January, WalletHub ranked Alabama the tenth most affected state by the federal government shutdown, which was determined by various metrics indicating the state’s dependence upon the federal government.

That analysis examined Alabama’s share of federal jobs and contracts, its access to federal lending programs, and its percentages of children reliant upon the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Click here to read the experts’ analyses.